Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic

Macultepec, Mexico

Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic

Macultepec, Mexico
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Magana-Contreras M.,Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco | Contreras-Paredes A.,National Cancer Institute of Mexico | Chavez-Blanco A.,National Cancer Institute of Mexico | Lizano M.,National Cancer Institute of Mexico | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Medical Virology | Year: 2015

Cervical cancer development has been mainly associated with persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. However, HPV infection is unlikely to be sufficient to cause cervical cancer, and the contribution of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) could be the determining factor for cervical lesion-progression. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of STIs associated with HPV-positivity in 201 cervical samples from patients who underwent annual routine gynecological exams. The overall prevalence of STIs was 57.7%, and the most frequent infection was Ureaplasma spp (UP) (39.8%), followed by Gardnerella vaginalis (GV) (25.9%), α-HPV (18.4%), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (1.5%), and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) (0.5%). The highest prevalence rate of multiple non-HPV infections was observed for the age-range 31-40; for papillomavirus infection, the age-range was 21-30. In normal cervical samples, HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype (24.3%), followed by genotypes 58 (13.5%) and 52 (10.8%). Intriguingly, HPV18 was not detected in the study population, and genotypes 52 and 58 were found exclusively in samples with abnormal cytology. Papillomavirus infection with oncogenic types was significantly associated with GV (P=0.025) and strongly associated with multiple non-HPV pathogens (P=0.002). The following variables correlated significantly with cytological diagnosis of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL): GV (P=0.028), multiple non-HPV infections (P=0.001), and high-risk HPV positivity (P=0.001). Epidemiological data from this study will contribute to the molecular detection of sexually transmitted pathogens from screening programs to identify those women who are at risk for developing cervical lesions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco and Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of medical virology | Year: 2015

Cervical cancer development has been mainly associated with persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. However, HPV infection is unlikely to be sufficient to cause cervical cancer, and the contribution of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) could be the determining factor for cervical lesion-progression. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of STIs associated with HPV-positivity in 201 cervical samples from patients who underwent annual routine gynecological exams. The overall prevalence of STIs was 57.7%, and the most frequent infection was Ureaplasma spp (UP) (39.8%), followed by Gardnerella vaginalis (GV) (25.9%), -HPV (18.4%), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (1.5%), and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) (0.5%). The highest prevalence rate of multiple non-HPV infections was observed for the age-range 31-40; for papillomavirus infection, the age-range was 21-30. In normal cervical samples, HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype (24.3%), followed by genotypes 58 (13.5%) and 52 (10.8%). Intriguingly, HPV18 was not detected in the study population, and genotypes 52 and 58 were found exclusively in samples with abnormal cytology. Papillomavirus infection with oncogenic types was significantly associated with GV (P=0.025) and strongly associated with multiple non-HPV pathogens (P=0.002). The following variables correlated significantly with cytological diagnosis of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL): GV (P=0.028), multiple non-HPV infections (P=0.001), and high-risk HPV positivity (P=0.001). Epidemiological data from this study will contribute to the molecular detection of sexually transmitted pathogens from screening programs to identify those women who are at risk for developing cervical lesions.


Selmin A.,Abano Terme General Hospital | Foltran F.,University of Padua | Chiarelli S.,University of Padua | Ciullo R.,Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic | Gregori D.,University of Padua
Pathology Research and Practice | Year: 2014

Objectives: This study aimed to verify whether the infantile hemangioma (IH) incidence in children whose placentas showed a chorangioma is higher than in the general population, thus addressing the hypothesized relationship between chorangioma and IH. Methods: All chorangioma diagnoses by the 1st Service of Pathology, University of Padova in 2004-2010, based on the analysis of placentas sent by the Department of Gynecological Sciences and Human Reproduction (University of Padova), were identified. Demographic, anamnestic and clinical data were collected from the mothers and newborns; mothers and pediatricians were interviewed by telephone within 1 year after birth to verify if any IH appeared. The incidence rates of IH and other adverse events (IUGR, preterm delivery, cesarean section, stillbirth) were compared with national and regional data, when available, or with estimates from the scientific literature. Results: Thirty-eight chorangioma diagnoses were found. Of 33 infants born with a placenta affected by chorangioma, 18 infants had IH. The IH incidence recorded in our series (55%) was significantly higher than that recorded in national and regional surveys and in the scientific literature. Similar findings have been observed for the incidence of stillbirth, preterm birth and low birth weight incidence. Conclusions: The IH incidence observed in our series appears to be significantly higher than that recorded among the general population, suggesting that an association between placental chorangioma and IH could exist which should be further verified in prospective studies. © 2014 Published by Elsevier GmbH .


Mihu D.,Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic | Diculescu D.,Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic | Costin N.,Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic | Mihu C.M.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca | And 3 more authors.
Medical Ultrasonography | Year: 2011

The information provided by Doppler ultrasound examination during labor permits the understanding of the mechanisms regarding the physiology and pathophysiology of feto-placental exchange and the fetal adaptive systems. There are certain technical difficulties related to intrapartum Doppler ultrasound examination. The investigated sites are the uterine arteries, umbilical arteries, fetal circulation. In diastole, when intrauterine pressure exceeds maternal diastolic pressure, the perfusion pressure of the uterine artery blood flow is no longer present. A progressive decrease in the diastolic component is seen along with an increase in intrauterine pressure from 10 to 60 mmHg. During premature birth or preeclampsia, there are particular changes in the uterine blood flow. A remarkable stability of the umbilical resistance index is found during labor, which shows the permanent presence of feto-placental exchange. Certain correlations can be established between fetal heart rate changes in labor and Doppler ultrasound aspects at the level of umbilical arteries. Doppler examination confirms the concept of reduced cerebral blood flow by the compression of the fetal skull as a cause of decelerations occurring during labor. The decision regarding the extraction of the fetus can only be made by correlating the results of Doppler ultrasound with the other paraclinical methods for the monitoring of the intrapartum fetal status.

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