Obesity Research Group

Trondheim, Norway

Obesity Research Group

Trondheim, Norway
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OTTAWA, ON - June 10, 2017 - A worldwide network of scientists examining the links between sedentary lifestyles and health problems such as obesity and cardiovascular disease today announced a new dictionary of terms to support research into sedentary behaviour. The results of the 'terminology consensus project' led by the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute's (CHEO RI) Sedentary Behaviour Research Network (SBRN) are published today in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity in a paper co-authored by 84 scientists from 20 countries. "This is the world's most extensive agreement to date on consensus definitions for researchers examining sedentary behaviour, an emerging global public health priority," said lead author Dr. Mark Tremblay, director of the CHEO RI's Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) and a professor at the University of Ottawa. "There is an urgent need for clear, common and accepted terminology worldwide to facilitate the interpretation and comparison of research. We have made tremendous progress by defining terms such as physical inactivity, stationary behaviour, sedentary behaviour, and screen time. These terms have already been translated into several languages for rapid global uptake." The paper, entitled "Sedentary Behaviour Research Network: Terminology Consensus Project Process and Outcome", provides refined definitions to suit all age groups, including babies, young children and people with chronic disease or mobility impairment. It also describes how bouts, breaks and interruptions should be defined and measured in the context of assessing sedentary behaviour and in relation to health outcomes. The conceptual framework described in the paper also illustrates how both energy expenditure and posture are important components and how the terms relate to movement behaviours throughout a 24-hour period, including physical activity and sleep. Examples provided distinguish between active and passive sitting, active and passive standing, sedentary and stationary behaviour, screen time and non-screen-based sedentary time. Sedentary behaviour for a baby, for example, includes sitting in a car seat with minimal movement and, for a toddler, watching TV while sitting, reclining or lying down. The 84 SBRN co-authors, which include researchers, trainees, graduate students, health practitioners and government employees, agree that standardization of the terminology is crucial to advancing future research, especially since this rapidly growing field of health science involves multi-disciplinary researchers, practitioners and industries. "These consensus definitions will help scientists and practitioners navigate and understand the rapidly evolving field of sedentary behaviour research, allowing for more consistent and robust exploration of behaviours across 24 hours - sleep, sedentary behaviours and various intensities of physical activity - and may facilitate future research exploring ways to alter behaviours to improve health," Dr. Tremblay said. "Our hope is that these will reduce confusion and advance research related to sedentary behaviour and, ultimately, promote healthy active living." Dr. Tremblay will chair a discussion of the project's findings at a workshop today at the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity annual meeting in Victoria, British Columbia. Consensus definitions have been translated into French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Korean, German, Greek, Traditional Chinese, and Japanese. The SBRN, based at the CHEO RI, was established in 2011 as an initiative born out of the HALO research group and is the only organization for researchers and health professionals which focuses specifically on the health impact of sedentary behaviour. Its mission is to connect sedentary behaviour researchers working in all fields of study and to disseminate related research. As of March 2017, it had 1,273 members in 35 countries. Membership is free and open to any researcher or health professional with an interest in sedentary behaviour (see http://www. ). The Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) at the CHEO RI was established in 2007 in response to the escalating obesity crisis and the increasing complexity of related co-morbidities. Today the HALO team consists of 17 staff (including 5 scientists), a childhood obesity clinical team (Centre for Healthy Active Living), 16 graduate students, trainees, undergraduate students, and many community volunteers. For more information, visit http://www. or @HALOresearch The CHEO Research Institute coordinates the research activities of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and is affiliated with the University of Ottawa. Its three programs of research include molecular biomedicine, health information technology, and evidence to practice research. Key themes include cancer, diabetes, obesity, mental health, emergency medicine, musculoskeletal health, electronic health information and privacy, and genetics of rare disease. The CHEO Research Institute makes discoveries today for healthier kids tomorrow. For more information, visit http://www. or @CHEOhospital


Martins C.,Obesity Research Group | Martins C.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Stensvold D.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Finlayson G.,University of Leeds | And 6 more authors.
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise | Year: 2015

Purpose: The effect of acute exercise, and exercise intensity, on appetite control in obese individuals requires further study. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute isocaloric bouts (250 kcal) of high-intensity intermittent cycling (HIIC) and moderate-intensity continuous cycling (MICC) or short-duration HIIC (S-HIIC) (125 kcal) and a resting control condition on the appetite hormone responses, subjective feelings of appetite, energy intake (EI), and food reward in overweight/obese individuals. Methods: This study is a randomized crossover study on 12 overweight/obese volunteers. Participants were assigned to the control, MICC, HIIC, and S-HIIC conditions, 1 wk apart, in a counterbalanced order. Exercise was performed 1 h after a standard breakfast. An ad libitum test lunch was served 3 h after breakfast. Fasting/postprandial plasma samples of insulin, acylated ghrelin, polypeptide YY3-36, and glucagon-like peptide 1 and subjective feelings of appetite were measured every 30 min for 3 h. Nutrient and taste preferences were measured at the beginning and end of each condition using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire. Results: Insulin levels were significantly reduced, and glucagon-like peptide 1 levels significantly increased during all exercise bouts compared with those during rest. Acylated ghrelin plasma levels were lower in the MICC and HIIC, but not in S-HIIC, compared with those in control. There were no significant differences for polypeptide YY3-36 plasma levels, hunger or fullness ratings, EI, or food reward. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that, in overweight/obese individuals, isocaloric bouts of moderate- or high-intensity exercise lead to a similar appetite response. This strengthens previous findings in normal-weight individuals that acute exercise, even at high intensity, does not induce any known physiological adaptation that would lead to increased EI. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Sports Medicine.


Ahern T.,Obesity Research Group | Tobin A.-M.,Park University | Corrigan M.,Obesity Research Group | Hogan A.,Obesity Research Group | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology | Year: 2013

Background Diabetes and obesity are more prevalent amongst psoriasis patients as is disturbance of the innate immune system. GLP-1 analogue therapy considerably improves weight and glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes and its receptor is present on innate immune cells. Objective We aimed to determine the effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue, on psoriasis severity. Methods Before and after 10 weeks of liraglutide therapy (1.2 mg subcutaneously daily) we determined the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) and the dermatology life quality index (DLQI) in seven people with both psoriasis and diabetes (median age 48 years, median body mass index 48.2 kg/m2). We also evaluated the immunomodulatory properties of liraglutide by measuring circulating lymphocyte subset numbers and monocyte cytokine production. Results Liraglutide therapy decreased the median PASI from 4.8 to 3.0 (P = 0.03) and the median DLQI from 6.0 to 2.0 (P = 0.03). Weight and glycaemic control improved significantly. Circulating invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells increased from 0.13% of T lymphocytes to 0.40% (P = 0.03). Liraglutide therapy also effected a non-significant 54% decrease in the proportion of circulating monocytes that produced tumour necrosis factor alpha (P = 0.07). Conclusion GLP-1 analogue therapy improves psoriasis severity, increases circulating iNKT cell number and modulates monocyte cytokine secretion. These effects may result from improvements in weight and glycaemic control as well as from direct immune effects of GLP-1 receptor activation. Prospective controlled trials of GLP-1 therapies are warranted, across all weight groups, in psoriasis patients with and without type 2 diabetes. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

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