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Trondheim, Norway

Martins C.,Obesity Research Group | Martins C.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Stensvold D.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Finlayson G.,University of Leeds | And 6 more authors.
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise | Year: 2015

Purpose: The effect of acute exercise, and exercise intensity, on appetite control in obese individuals requires further study. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute isocaloric bouts (250 kcal) of high-intensity intermittent cycling (HIIC) and moderate-intensity continuous cycling (MICC) or short-duration HIIC (S-HIIC) (125 kcal) and a resting control condition on the appetite hormone responses, subjective feelings of appetite, energy intake (EI), and food reward in overweight/obese individuals. Methods: This study is a randomized crossover study on 12 overweight/obese volunteers. Participants were assigned to the control, MICC, HIIC, and S-HIIC conditions, 1 wk apart, in a counterbalanced order. Exercise was performed 1 h after a standard breakfast. An ad libitum test lunch was served 3 h after breakfast. Fasting/postprandial plasma samples of insulin, acylated ghrelin, polypeptide YY3-36, and glucagon-like peptide 1 and subjective feelings of appetite were measured every 30 min for 3 h. Nutrient and taste preferences were measured at the beginning and end of each condition using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire. Results: Insulin levels were significantly reduced, and glucagon-like peptide 1 levels significantly increased during all exercise bouts compared with those during rest. Acylated ghrelin plasma levels were lower in the MICC and HIIC, but not in S-HIIC, compared with those in control. There were no significant differences for polypeptide YY3-36 plasma levels, hunger or fullness ratings, EI, or food reward. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that, in overweight/obese individuals, isocaloric bouts of moderate- or high-intensity exercise lead to a similar appetite response. This strengthens previous findings in normal-weight individuals that acute exercise, even at high intensity, does not induce any known physiological adaptation that would lead to increased EI. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Sports Medicine.


Ahern T.,Obesity Research Group | Tobin A.-M.,Park University | Corrigan M.,Obesity Research Group | Hogan A.,Obesity Research Group | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology | Year: 2013

Background Diabetes and obesity are more prevalent amongst psoriasis patients as is disturbance of the innate immune system. GLP-1 analogue therapy considerably improves weight and glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes and its receptor is present on innate immune cells. Objective We aimed to determine the effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue, on psoriasis severity. Methods Before and after 10 weeks of liraglutide therapy (1.2 mg subcutaneously daily) we determined the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) and the dermatology life quality index (DLQI) in seven people with both psoriasis and diabetes (median age 48 years, median body mass index 48.2 kg/m2). We also evaluated the immunomodulatory properties of liraglutide by measuring circulating lymphocyte subset numbers and monocyte cytokine production. Results Liraglutide therapy decreased the median PASI from 4.8 to 3.0 (P = 0.03) and the median DLQI from 6.0 to 2.0 (P = 0.03). Weight and glycaemic control improved significantly. Circulating invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells increased from 0.13% of T lymphocytes to 0.40% (P = 0.03). Liraglutide therapy also effected a non-significant 54% decrease in the proportion of circulating monocytes that produced tumour necrosis factor alpha (P = 0.07). Conclusion GLP-1 analogue therapy improves psoriasis severity, increases circulating iNKT cell number and modulates monocyte cytokine secretion. These effects may result from improvements in weight and glycaemic control as well as from direct immune effects of GLP-1 receptor activation. Prospective controlled trials of GLP-1 therapies are warranted, across all weight groups, in psoriasis patients with and without type 2 diabetes. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

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