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Mo M.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Waterhouse D.R.,Oatley Flora and Fauna Conservation Society
Australian Field Ornithology | Year: 2015

This paper extends previous observations of behavioural development in Powerful Owl Ninox strenua fledglings. The study combines a near-daily visual monitoring program on a pair of owlets in Oatley, suburban Sydney, New South Wales, with corresponding pellet analysis. The fledglings were initially fed on possums, fruit-bats, birds and insects, and first demonstrated independence by disassembling carcasses by themselves. By October, they apparently mimicked the adults' strategy for capturing insects, and began to chase birds and bats. Behaviours thought to be part of honing their hunting skills - including tearing and ferrying strips of bark, foliage-snatching, and swooping at animals on the ground - were recorded. Such actions intensified during a period when the adults were mostly absent in November and December. Source


Mo M.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Waterhouse D.R.,Oatley Flora and Fauna Conservation Society
Australian Zoologist | Year: 2015

Once seen in flocks of thousands, the 20th Century was a testing period for the Topknot Pigeon Lopholaimus antarcticus. Bountiful numbers of this frugivorous bird relied on large expanses of habitat to provide a steady supply of fruiting trees. The lllawarra rainforests, already ravaged by clearing in the 1800's, was reduced to what is today less than five percent of its original area. In response, the super-flocks became scarce in the early part of the 20th Century. While they were able to adapt by feeding off paddock rainforest trees, another trial came in the form of extensive shooting for their meat This paper describes the relationship of people with the Topknot Pigeon in the lllawarra through eyewitness accounts from the last century. There is a particular focus on the persevering culture of shooting and the endeavours to eliminate this. Source

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