St Louis, MO, United States
St Louis, MO, United States

Oakwood University is a private, historically black university located in Huntsville, Alabama, United States. It is owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. A group of College constituents made the decision on December 2, 2007, to change the school's name from Oakwood College to Oakwood University.Oakwood University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Department of Education of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists to award the associate, baccalaureate, and master's degrees. The first master's degree offered by the University was the Master of Pastoral Studies Degree . The first graduate students were conferred degrees on May 9, 2009. Oakwood also conferred its first honorary doctorate on May 9, 2009, to alumnus Wintley Phipps, internationally renowned musician and the 2009 Commencement speaker. Oakwood University has been a member institution of the United Negro College Fund since 1964.The University has performed well in external rankings, having listed among the Best Baccalaureate Colleges in the Southern Region and #28 on the list of Best Historically Black Colleges and Universities by the U.S. News & World Report, tied with Alabama A&M University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The University is also listed on a regular basis among the top 20 institutions of higher learning that provide African-Americans to medical schools.Oakwood University owns and operates the Christian radio station WJOU 90.1 FM, formerly WOCG. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Oakwood | Date: 2014-04-21

An energy absorber includes a base sheet and a plurality of energy absorbing units with domed countermeasures extending from the base sheet. The countermeasures have slits in a domed portion thereof. The side walls of the energy absorbing units protect an adjacent object by cushioning the blow following repeated impacts in both vehicular and non-vehicular (e.g. helmets) environments. Preferably the side walls are oriented to buckle or bend after absorbing energy when impacted. The countermeasures primarily deaden any associated buzzes, squeaks or rattles. The integrally-formed countermeasures have a lower standing strength than the energy absorbing units. Methods related to the above are also described.


Patent
Oakwood | Date: 2014-09-11

An energy absorber includes a base sheet and a plurality of energy absorbing units with end walls and associated leaf spring or helicoid accessories extending from the base sheet. The accessories reduce buzzes, squeaks and rattles associated with an environment of use. In one embodiment, the leaf springs are defined by slits in a domed portion of the end walls. In another embodiment, the helicoid is formed by for example a milling step performed on an end wall. The side walls buckle or bend after absorbing energy. Methods related to the above are also described.


Patent
Oakwood | Date: 2014-03-25

Disclosed is a system to generate bubbles. The bubbles may be formed to include a substantially or medically pure gas. The bubbles may be formed on demand and in a selected small size.


Patent
Oakwood | Date: 2014-11-13

Catheters for infusion of cardiovascular fluids into blood are disclosed. The cardiovascular fluid may, for example, comprise water highly supersaturated with a gas such as oxygen. Each catheter comprises one or more capillary tubings (or capillaries) through which a cardiovascular fluid flows. The distal end of each capillary is mounted (e.g., potted) preferably flush with an external surface of a catheter sidewall, while the proximal end of each capillary is in fluid communication with a cardiovascular fluid flowing through the lumen of the catheter. The combination of the catheter shape and the orientation of the distal end of each capillary relative to the longitudinal axis of the catheter provides control over the mixing pattern of the cardiovascular fluid with blood flowing within a vascular space such as an aorta.


A sustained release microsphere formulation with a high drug load may be formed by a continuous oil-in-water emulsion process by combining an organic dispersed phase with an aqueous continuous phase. The dispersed phase may include an encapsulating polymer, a primary solvent, such as dichloromethane, a pharmaceutically effective amount of an active agent having a solubility relative to the dispersed phase, and a co-solvent, such as benzyl alcohol, which is capable of increasing the solubility of the active agent relative to the dispersed phase. The continuous phase may include an aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol and water.


A method of making a sustained release microsphere formulation, wherein the release rate of a bioactive ingredient is manipulated by controlling the crystallinity of said bioactive ingredient, includes the steps of combining the active ingredient and an encapsulating polymer in at least one solvent, or mixtures thereof, to form a dispersed phase and processing the dispersed phase without filtering, filtering the combined dispersed phase with a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic filter, or filtering the active ingredient and encapsulating polymer individually with a hydrophobic or hydrophilic filter before combining them to form the dispersed phase. The dispersed phase is then combined with a continuous phase to form the microsphere formulation.


Patent
Oakwood | Date: 2014-02-18

An energy absorber 10 that has a spine 12 which has a relaxed configuration and a deployment configuration. In the deployment configuration, the spine 12 lies proximate to a substrate 14 to protect the substrate 14 from an impacting object 16. Preferably, the spine 12 is bendable to conform to the substrate 14. The spine includes a number (N) of energy absorbing modules 18, 20, 22, 24, . . . , where 1<=N<=1000. At least some of the modules have a number (L) of mutually supporting energy absorbing vertebral members 30, where 1<=L<=100. Each vertebral member 30 includes a number (U) of coalesced energy absorbing units 32, 34, were 2<=U<=10. At least some of the energy absorbing units 32, 34 have a base 36 that preferably but not necessarily is oriented toward the impacting object 16.


Patent
Oakwood | Date: 2013-04-18

A grille 10 for covering an aperture in a panel 16 that supports audio equipment behind a back face of the panel 16, the grille 10 being installed upon a front face of the panel. The grille comprises a formed sheet of pierced and expanded sheet material that has a major axis (A-A) running parallel to a direction in which the sheet is introduced to a forming machine and a minor axis (B-B) that extends orthogonally to the major axis (A-A). The formed sheet has a central portion with surface discontinuities selected that are swirls 18, stiffening furrows 22 and ridges 20 running substantially parallel to the major axis (A-A) and combinations thereof.


Polymer and drug containing compositions and method of preparing such compositions are disclosed. The dispersed phase formulation has a polymer, a pharmaceutically or biologically active agent and a small fraction of low pKa acid additive. Stable, filter sterilizable, non-gelling solutions containing GnRH analogues at least at levels typically used in sustained release formulations and a method of increasing solubility of a high level of a GnRH analogue or a freeze-dried antgonist of GnRH in a polymer containing solution are also disclosed. The amount of the acid additive in the polymer solution is such that it is sufficient to increase the solubility of the high level of the GnRH analogue in the polymer solution without affecting the release characteristics of the microspheres prepared therefrom.


A sustained release microsphere formulation with a high drug load may be formed by a continuous oil-in-water emulsion process by combining an organic dispersed phase with an aqueous continuous phase. The dispersed phase may include an encapsulating polymer, a primary solvent, such as dichloromethane, a pharmaceutically effective amount of an active agent having a solubility relative to the dispersed phase, and a co-solvent, such as benzyl alcohol, which is capable of increasing the solubility of the active agent relative to the dispersed phase. The continuous phase may include an aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol and water.

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