Rochester, MI, United States

Oakland University

www.oakland.edu
Rochester, MI, United States

Oakland University is a public university located in the cities of Auburn Hills and Rochester Hills, Michigan. Situated on a 1,443-acre campus, it was co-founded by Matilda Dodge Wilson and John A. Hannah. It is the only major research university in Oakland County, from which OU derives its name, and it serves much of the Metro Detroit region. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has classified OU as a Doctoral Research University.Oakland University was initially under the banner of Michigan State University as Michigan State University–Oakland, or MSU-O. It opened in 1959 with 570 students and three buildings. In 1963, it became known as Oakland University.The university's athletic teams compete in Division I of the NCAA and are collectively known as the Golden Grizzlies. They are members of the Horizon League. Wikipedia.

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Xiong Y.,Ford Motor Company | Mahmood A.,Ford Motor Company | Chopp M.,Ford Motor Company | Chopp M.,Oakland University
Nature Reviews Neuroscience | Year: 2013

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity both in civilian life and on the battlefield worldwide. Survivors of TBI frequently experience long-term disabling changes in cognition, sensorimotor function and personality. Over the past three decades, animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of human TBI, to better understand the underlying pathophysiology and to explore potential treatments. Nevertheless, promising neuroprotective drugs that were identified as being effective in animal TBI models have all failed in Phase II or Phase III clinical trials. This failure in clinical translation of preclinical studies highlights a compelling need to revisit the current status of animal models of TBI and therapeutic strategies. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.82M | Year: 2015

The impacts of climate change, and warming in particular, on natural ecosystems remain poorly understood, and research to date has focused on individual species (e.g. range shifts of polar bears). Multispecies systems (food webs, ecosystems), however, can possess emergent properties that can only be understood using a system-level perspective. Within a given food web, the microbial world is the engine that drives key ecosystem processes, biogeochemical cycles (e.g. the carbon-cycle) and network properties, but has been hidden from view due to difficulties with identifying which microbes are present and what they are doing. The recent revolution in Next Generation Sequencing has removed this bottleneck and we can now open the microbial black box to characterise the metagenome (who is there?) and metatranscriptome (what are they doing?) of the community for the first time. These advances will allow us to address a key overarching question: should we expect a global response to global warming? There are bodies of theory that suggest this might be the case, including the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and the Everything is Everywhere hypothesis of global microbial biogeography, yet these ideas have yet to be tested rigorously at appropriate scales and in appropriate experimental contexts that allow us to identify patterns and causal relationships in real multispecies systems. We will assess the impacts of warming across multiple levels of biological organisation, from genes to food webs and whole ecosystems, using geothermally warmed freshwaters in 5 high-latitude regions (Svalbard, Iceland, Greenland, Alaska, Kamchatka), where warming is predicted to be especially rapid,. Our study will be the first to characterise the impacts of climate change on multispecies systems at such an unprecedented scale. Surveys of these sentinel systems will be complemented with modelling and experiments conducted in these field sites, as well as in 100s of large-scale mesocosms (artificial streams and ponds) in the field and 1,000s of microcosms of robotically-assembled microbial communities in the laboratory. Our novel genes-to-ecosystems approach will allow us to integrate measures of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. For instance, we will quantify key functional genes as well as quantifying which genes are switched on (the metatranscriptome) in addition to measuring ecosystem functioning (e.g. processes related to the carbon cycle). We will also measure the impacts of climate change on the complex networks of interacting species we find in nature - what Darwin called the entangled bank - because food webs and other types of networks can produce counterintuitive responses that cannot be predicted from studying species in isolation. One general objective is to assess the scope for biodiversity insurance and resilience of natural systems in the face of climate change. We will combine our intercontinental surveys with natural experiments, bioassays, manipulations and mathematical models to do this. For instance, we will characterise how temperature-mediated losses to biodiversity can compromise key functional attributes of the gene pool and of the ecosystem as a whole. There is an assumption in the academic literature and in policy that freshwater ecosystems are relatively resilient because the apparently huge scope for functional redundancy could allow for compensation for species loss in the face of climate change. However, this has not been quantified empirically in natural systems, and errors in estimating the magnitude of functional redundancy could have substantial environmental and economic repercussions. The research will address a set of key specific questions and hypotheses within our 5 themed Workpackages, of broad significance to both pure and applied ecology, and which also combine to provide a more holistic perspective than has ever been attempted previously.


Srinivasan G.,Oakland University
Annual Review of Materials Research | Year: 2010

In a composite of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric phases, mechanical strain mediates magnetoelectric (ME) coupling between the magnetic and the electric subsystems. This review discusses recent advances in the physics of ME interactions in layered composites and nanostructures and potential device applications. The ME phenomena of importance are giant low-frequency interactions and coupling when the electric and/or the magnetic subsystems show resonance, including electromechanical resonance (EMR) in the piezoelectric phase, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in the magnetic phase, and magnetoacoustic resonance at the overlap of EMR and FMR. Potential device applications for the composites are magnetic-field sensors, dual electric-field- and magnetic-field-tunable microwave and millimeter-wave devices, and miniature antennas. © 2010 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 180.13K | Year: 2016

Tuskegee University is leading a team of Alabama institutions, which includes Auburn University, Alabama A&M University, Auburn University Montgomery, Southern Union State Junior College, and Lawson State Community College, with support from Oakland University to implement a collaborative S-STEM project titled Making to Advance Knowledge, Excellence, and Recognition in STEM (MAKERS). The MAKERS project will provide scholarships to up to 158 students majoring in the biological, physical, mathematical, geological, and computer and information sciences; engineering; and associated technology areas. The MAKERS team will implement and assess a comprehensive list of hierarchical, evidence-based interventions designed to facilitate transfer, increase persistence and retention, and prepare Scholars for graduation and future careers in STEM fields. The MAKERS S-STEM model is designed to attenuate the potential factors that decrease persistence of low-income students in STEM degree programs by integrating STEM enrichment, research, and peripheral activities. The nature of many of the MAKERS project components and the wide range of institutional contexts show promise for improving outcomes for students at other institutions with similar demographics while capitalizing on their existing resources. MAKERS hallmark intervention will be Learning by Making, which will involve interdisciplinary Scholar clusters identifying and investigating problems affecting their local communities, and applying their STEM knowledge to make a product that has the potential to solve those problems.

The major objectives of MAKERS are to: (1) increase student retention and graduation rates; (2) prepare students with the STEM academic foundation, professional skills and experiences needed to enter the STEM workforce or graduate school in STEM disciplines; and (3) investigate the MAKERS models impact on recruitment, retention, success, and graduation of students in the target population and majors. The MAKERS project is innovative because, rather than focusing solely on developing the students academic potential or restructuring institutional variables, it will empower students as active agents in their education by creating connections between their majors and the local community, mitigating potential inhibiting factors in the students social context. Three unique aspects of the project - immersion of scholars in the Learning by Making process; strong cross-institutional social and professional networks; and the use of online platforms for support and collaboration - have the potential to transform the learning process for these students, helping them develop a STEM identity, fostering agency, and persisting to degree completion. A team of evaluation experts will continuously assess its interventions using mixed methods and provide feedback to the investigators to identify new best practices that will be added to the extant knowledge base on broadening participation of low-income groups in STEM fields.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: FED CYBER SERV: SCHLAR FOR SER | Award Amount: 156.69K | Year: 2016

This project aims to build cybersecurity capacity of the United States in pervasive computing. Although significant efforts have been made in addressing the security and privacy issues of pervasive computing in research community, a strategic implementation that promotes workforce development from both academic and experiential learning in cybersecurity education is still lacking in pervasive computing. It is imperative to bring cybersecurity research results into education, cultivate the well prepared cybersecurity workforce, and strengthen the long-term collaboration among academic institutions, industry, and government.

The project identifies five major objectives in security and privacy issues of pervasive computing: 1) developing new courses and course modules; 2) constructing hands-on virtual labs; 3) engaging students in research with timely research topics; 4) establishing and strengthening relationships with partners; and 5) developing career interest and professional capabilities in cybersecurity with a focus on women and underrepresented students. Unified under the central theme of security and privacy, the wide coverage of cyberspace facets in pervasive computing will allow students to learn the state-of-the-art research findings, gain hands-on experiences from the most up-to-date software, platforms, and infrastructures, engage in scientific research in their best interests, and obtain a comprehensive in-breadth appreciation of the overall cybersecurity state-of-the-art through the new courses and labs, industry-sponsored capstones, cooperative research projects, cybersecurity student organizations, invited talks, and webinars held by the proposed project.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: SOFTWARE & HARDWARE FOUNDATION | Award Amount: 109.36K | Year: 2017

High performance computing (HPC) focuses on using numerical model to simulate complex science and engineering phenomena, such as galaxies, weather and climate, molecular interactions, electric power grids, and aircraft in flight. Over the next decade the goal is to build HPC parallel system capable of extreme-scale performance (one exaflop (1018)operations per second) and processing exabyte (1018) of data. However, one of the biggest challenges of achieving extreme-scale performance is what is known as the hardware memory wall, which is about the growing gap between the speed of computation performed by CPU and the speed of supplying data to the CPU from memory systems (about x100 time slower). The low performance efficiency of modern HPC system (average <60% and could be as low as 5%) manifests the memory wall impact since a huge amount of computation cycles are wasted for waiting for the arrival of input data. It becomes very critical to create effective software solutions for achieving the computation potential of hardware and for improving the efficiency and usability of the existing and future computing system. Such solutions will significantly benefit a broad range of disciplines that use parallel computers to solve scientific and engineering problems, and accelerate scientific discovery and problem solving to improve quality of life of the society.
This CAREER project develops innovative software techniques to address the programming and performance challenges of the existing and emerging memory systems: 1) a portable abstract machine model for programming, compiling and executing parallel applications, 2) new programming interface and model for data mapping, movement, and consistency, and 3) machine-aware compilation and data-aware scheduling techniques to realize an asynchronous task flow execution model to hide the latency of data movement. It addresses the memory wall challenge by developing a memory-centric programming paradigm for helping achieve extreme-scale performance of parallel applications with minimum impairment to programmability. For education, the project involves a broader community starting from high school in the area of HPC and computer science.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 800.69K | Year: 2016

Abstract
The objective of this project is to acquire a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and necessary accessories for use in a wide array of research projects and educational activities. Scientific advances in micro and nanometer regimes in last few decades have heavily relied on critical visualization and miniaturization tools in the respective areas. Due to its ultrahigh surface and cross-sectional imaging resolutions, A TEM is essential in many fundamental research areas. Researchers at multiple departments at Oakland University have keen needs of a TEM in their researches in microelectronics, materials, physics, chemistry and other multidisciplinary areas. Acquisition of this proposed TEM will have immediate significant impact in advancing our understanding of many fundamental phenomena at the bottom of physics and chemistry in a number of application areas. The requested instrument will be shared by involved research groups across the Oakland campus and made accessible to other institutes and local industrial companies. It will make measurable contributions to the diversification of economy in the Metro Detroit area and Southeastern Michigan. Additionally, the use of the TEM in multiple existing and enabled new graduate and undergraduate courses will greatly enhance our science and engineering curricula at Oakland. It will also have direct impacts on other educational and outreach programs the PIs have been actively participating in.

The requested TEM from JEOL USA is a multiple imaging and analytical tool capable of transmission and diffraction electron beam imaging and x-ray energy spectroscopy with sub-nanometer morphological and cross-sectional resolutions. The easy adjustable electron energy levels of the TEM allow for imaging and analysis of a broad range of materials including biological, organics and inorganics materials such as metals, semiconductors, and ceramics, etc. Critical sample preparation tools for a variety of specimens are also included in the request. With its particular ultrahigh resolution and compositional analyses capability, the system has immediate impacts on multiple federal and state funded research programs investigating fundamental phenomena in microelectronics, new multiferroic magneto-electric nanocomposite materials and structures, nano-tribology, bio-chemical interface and sensors, new energy storage materials, etc. It also benefits multiple NSF funded educational projects across campus. The instrument will be housed in the 1400-sqft Advanced Analytical Instrumentation Center in the state-of-the-art Engineering Center (EC) that was recently completed in 2014. It will be made accessible by involved PIs and users from other institutes on a usage fee basis.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: FED CYBER SERV: SCHLAR FOR SER | Award Amount: 143.31K | Year: 2016

This project aims to build cybersecurity capacity of the United States in pervasive computing. Although significant efforts have been made in addressing the security and privacy issues of pervasive computing in research community, a strategic implementation that promotes workforce development from both academic and experiential learning in cybersecurity education is still lacking in pervasive computing. It is imperative to bring cybersecurity research results into education, cultivate the well prepared cybersecurity workforce, and strengthen the long-term collaboration among academic institutions, industry, and government.

The project identifies five major objectives in security and privacy issues of pervasive computing: 1) developing new courses and course modules; 2) constructing hands-on virtual labs; 3) engaging students in research with timely research topics; 4) establishing and strengthening relationships with partners; and 5) developing career interest and professional capabilities in cybersecurity with a focus on women and underrepresented students. Unified under the central theme of security and privacy, the wide coverage of cyberspace facets in pervasive computing will allow students to learn the state-of-the-art research findings, gain hands-on experiences from the most up-to-date software, platforms, and infrastructures, engage in scientific research in their best interests, and obtain a comprehensive in-breadth appreciation of the overall cybersecurity state-of-the-art through the new courses and labs, industry-sponsored capstones, cooperative research projects, cybersecurity student organizations, invited talks, and webinars held by the proposed project.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: RES EXP FOR TEACHERS(RET)-SITE | Award Amount: 575.98K | Year: 2015

This Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science Site at Oakland University (OU) will involve middle and high school science and mathematics teachers and pre-service teachers from the metro-Detroit area in multidisciplinary and cutting edge research on alternative energy and automotive engineering. The multidisciplinary aspects of this research will allow STEM teachers to strengthen their engineering knowledge and to incorporate their experiences into project based curricular modules that will excite and interest their students. The topics covered range from biodiesel, Lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cells to internal combustion engines, automotive tribology, optical diagnostics, autonomous vehicles and ergonomics for automotive applications. Through this program the RET participants will not only gain first-hand experience in the use of experimental, simulation and fabrications tools, as well as the analysis of research results, but will also receive a strong foundation in the pedagogical tools of inquiry-based teaching and learning. The program will impact two areas that are of direct interest to the United States and the world: increasing access for underrepresented K-12 teachers and their students to a deeper understanding of the STEM disciplines, research and career opportunities; and inspiring teachers and students to pursue engineering careers.

Over a three year period this RET Site will offer an intensive six week summer research program for a total of 36 middle and high school science and mathematics teachers and pre-service teachers from the metro-Detroit area. Key features of the program include: 1) Direct supervision of projects and course material development by OU School of Engineering and Computer Science (SECS)and School of Education and Human Services (SEHS) faculty mentors and graduate students; 2) Involvement of RET teachers and their students in timely, cutting-edge research projects in the area of alternative energy and automotive engineering: 3) Recruitment of STEM teachers from high needs school districts in metro-Detroit as well as pre-service teachers from southeastern Michigan; 4) Research and education activities and seminars to strengthen teachers engineering knowledge and provide them with effective pedagogical strategies that will help them translate their research experiences into course modules that will excite their students about STEM fields and align with state and national standards; 5) Thoughtful follow-up plans including site visits by faculty and graduate student mentors to the RET participants classrooms, teacher training workshops and seminars, industry tours, and development of a program website for dissemination of research and teachers experiences.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2015

This DARPA STTR Phase II project is focused on novel voltage-tunable multiferroic heterostructures and components. Deliverables include: (1) liquid-phase epitaxial growth ferrite/ferroelectric heterostructures with strong magnetoelectric coupling; (2) voltage-tunable multiferroic inductors and transformers with large tunable inductance range of 2/1 and high quality factor > 20 within UHF (0.3GHz ~ 3GHz) with tuning voltages of 12 - 20 V; (3) voltage tunable UHF multiferroic bandpass filter based upon voltage tunable RF inductors and RF MEMS varactors with a tuning voltages of 12-20 V, frequency tuning range > 100%, fractional 3-dB bandwidth < 10%, low insertion loss < 3 dB, and P1dB: > 30 dBm. (4) voltage tunable multiferroic RF impedance tuner at UHF with voltage tunable RF inductors and RF MEMS varactors with a frequency tuning range >100% and P1dB: >30dBm with applied voltages of 12~20V; and (5) voltage tunable multiferroic bandpass filter at C-bandwith a tuning voltages of 12-20V, frequency tuning range > 100%, fractional 3-dB bandwidth < 10%, low insertion loss < 3dB, and P1dB: >30dBm. This project will lead to a new generation RF tuning technology, which leads to novel military radios and radars with a giant tunable frequency range.

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