NY Medical College

Hawthorne, NY, United States

NY Medical College

Hawthorne, NY, United States
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DeChristopher L.R.,NY Medical College | Tucker K.L.,University of Massachusetts Lowell
Public Health Nutrition | Year: 2016

Objective High soft drink consumption has been linked with asthma. Anecdotal evidence links high-fructose corn syrup with asthma. The receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has emerged as a mediator of asthma. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) assess the correlation between intake of beverages containing excess free fructose (EFF beverages) and asthma in children; and (ii) epidemiologically test the mechanistic hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, such as apple juice or beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, is associated with increased risk of asthma. This hypothesis is based on the possible effect of increases in the in situ intestinal formation of advanced glycation end products (enFruAGE) with EFF, which may be absorbed and play a role in RAGE-mediated asthma. Design We examined cross-sectional associations between beverage intake and self-reported current or history of asthma. Exposure variables were EFF beverages, including apple juice (AJ), non-diet soft drinks (ndSD) and fruit drinks (FD). Orange juice (OJ), not an EFF beverage, was included as a comparison. Rao-Scott χ 2 analysis was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, BMI and total energy intake. Setting Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006, a nationally representative survey. Subjects US children (n 1961) aged 2-9 years with complete responses on the dietary frequency questionnaire. Results Intakes of EFF beverages were significantly associated with asthma in 2-9-year-olds. Adjusted odds of asthma in children consuming EFF beverages ≥5 times/week was more than five times that in children consuming these beverages ≤1 time/month (OR=5·29, P=0·012). Children consuming AJ ≥5 times/week v. ≤1 time/month, adjusted for the other beverages, were more than twice as likely to have asthma (OR=2·43, P=0·035). In contrast, there was a tendency for OJ to be protective. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, including AJ and beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, is associated with asthma in children aged 2-9 years. Results support the mechanistic hypothesis that enFruAGE may be an overlooked contributor to asthma in children. Longitudinal studies are needed to provide evidence of causal association. © 2015 The Authors.


De Christopher L.R.,NY Medical College | Tucker K.L.,University of Massachusetts Lowell
Nutrition and Diabetes | Year: 2016

Objective:There is a link between joint and gut inflammation of unknown etiology in arthritis. Existing research indicates that regular consumption of high-fructose corn syrup sweetened (HFCS) soft drinks, but not diet soft drinks, may be associated with increased risk of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in women, independent of other dietary and lifestyle factors. One unexplored hypothesis for this association is that fructose malabsorption, due to regular consumption of excess free fructose (EFF) and HFCS, contributes to fructose reactivity in the gastrointestinal tract and intestinal in situ formation of enFruAGEs, which once absorbed, travel beyond the intestinal boundaries to other tissues and promote inflammation. In separate studies, the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products has been associated with joint inflammation in RA. Objective of this study was to assess the association between EFF beverages intake and non-age, non-wear and tear-associated arthritis in US young adults.Methods:In this cross sectional study of 1209 adults aged 20-30y, (Nutrition and Health Examination Surveys 2003-2006) exposure variables were high EFF beverages, including HFCS sweetened soft drinks, and any combination of HFCS sweetened soft drinks, fruit drinks (FD) and apple juice, referred to as tEFF. Analyses of diet soda and diet FD were included for comparison. The outcome was self-reported arthritis. Rao Scott χ2 was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for confounders.Results:Young adults consuming any combination of high EFF beverages (tEFF) ≥5 times/week (but not diet soda) were three times as likely to have arthritis as non/low consumers (odds ratios=3.01; p≤0.021; 95% confidence intervals=1.20-7.59), independent of all covariates, including physical activity, other dietary factors, blood glucose and smoking.Conclusion:EFF beverage intake is significantly associated with arthritis in US adults aged 20-30 years, possibly due to the intestinal in situ formation of enFruAGEs.


Dechristopher L.R.,NY Medical College | Tucker K.L.,University of Massachusetts Lowell
Nutrition Journal | Year: 2015

Background: High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) sweetened soft drink intake has been linked with asthma in US high-schoolers. Intake of beverages with excess free fructose (EFF), including apple juice, and HFCS sweetened fruit drinks and soft drinks, has been associated with asthma in children. One hypothesis for this association is that underlying fructose malabsorption and fructose reactivity in the GI may contribute to in situ formation of enFruAGEs. EnFruAGEs may be an overlooked source of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) that contribute to lung disease. AGE/ RAGEs are elevated in COPD lungs. EFF intake has increased in recent decades, and intakes may exceed dosages associated with adult fructose malabsorption in subsets of the population. Intestinal dysfunction has been shown to be elevated in COPD patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between HFCS sweetened soft drink intake and chronic bronchitis (CB), a common manifestation of COPD, in adults. Methods: Design: In this cross sectional analysis, the outcome variable was self-reported existing chronic bronchitis or history of CB. Exposure variable was non-diet soda. Rao Scott χ2 was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for age, sex, race-ethnicity, BMI, smoking, exposure to in-home smoking, pre-diabetes, diabetes, SES, total energy and total fruits and beverages consumption. Setting: Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006. Subjects: 2801 adults aged 20-55 y. Results: There was a statistically significant correlation between intake of non-diet soft drinks and greater prevalence and odds of chronic bronchitis (p∈<∈0.05). Independent of all covariates, intake of non-diet soda ≥5 times a week (vs. non/low non-diet soda) was associated with nearly twice the likelihood of having chronic bronchitis (OR∈=∈1.80; p∈=∈0.047; 95 % CI 1.01-3.20). Conclusions: HFCS sweetened soft drink intake is correlated with chronic bronchitis in US adults aged 20-55 y, after adjusting for covariates, including smoking. Results support the hypothesis that underlying fructose malabsorption and fructose reactivity in the GI may contribute to chronic bronchitis, perhaps through in situ formation of enFruAGEs, which may contribute to lung disease. Longitudinal and biochemical research is needed to confirm and clarify the mechanisms involved. © 2015 DeChristopher et al.


PubMed | University of Massachusetts Lowell and NY Medical College
Type: | Journal: Nutrition journal | Year: 2015

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) sweetened soft drink intake has been linked with asthma in US high-schoolers. Intake of beverages with excess free fructose (EFF), including apple juice, and HFCS sweetened fruit drinks and soft drinks, has been associated with asthma in children. One hypothesis for this association is that underlying fructose malabsorption and fructose reactivity in the GI may contribute to in situ formation of enFruAGEs. EnFruAGEs may be an overlooked source of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) that contribute to lung disease. AGE/ RAGEs are elevated in COPD lungs. EFF intake has increased in recent decades, and intakes may exceed dosages associated with adult fructose malabsorption in subsets of the population. Intestinal dysfunction has been shown to be elevated in COPD patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between HFCS sweetened soft drink intake and chronic bronchitis (CB), a common manifestation of COPD, in adults.In this cross sectional analysis, the outcome variable was self-reported existing chronic bronchitis or history of CB. Exposure variable was non-diet soda. Rao Scott (2) was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for age, sex, race-ethnicity, BMI, smoking, exposure to in-home smoking, pre-diabetes, diabetes, SES, total energy and total fruits and beverages consumption.Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.2801 adults aged 20-55 y.There was a statistically significant correlation between intake of non-diet soft drinks and greater prevalence and odds of chronic bronchitis (p<0.05). Independent of all covariates, intake of non-diet soda 5 times a week (vs. non/low non-diet soda) was associated with nearly twice the likelihood of having chronic bronchitis (OR=1.80; p=0.047; 95% CI 1.01-3.20).HFCS sweetened soft drink intake is correlated with chronic bronchitis in US adults aged 20-55 y, after adjusting for covariates, including smoking. Results support the hypothesis that underlying fructose malabsorption and fructose reactivity in the GI may contribute to chronic bronchitis, perhaps through in situ formation of enFruAGEs, which may contribute to lung disease. Longitudinal and biochemical research is needed to confirm and clarify the mechanisms involved.


PubMed | University of Massachusetts Lowell and NY Medical College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Public health nutrition | Year: 2016

High soft drink consumption has been linked with asthma. Anecdotal evidence links high-fructose corn syrup with asthma. The receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has emerged as a mediator of asthma. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) assess the correlation between intake of beverages containing excess free fructose (EFF beverages) and asthma in children; and (ii) epidemiologically test the mechanistic hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, such as apple juice or beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, is associated with increased risk of asthma. This hypothesis is based on the possible effect of increases in the in situ intestinal formation of advanced glycation end products (enFruAGE) with EFF, which may be absorbed and play a role in RAGE-mediated asthma.We examined cross-sectional associations between beverage intake and self-reported current or history of asthma. Exposure variables were EFF beverages, including apple juice (AJ), non-diet soft drinks (ndSD) and fruit drinks (FD). Orange juice (OJ), not an EFF beverage, was included as a comparison. Rao-Scott (2) analysis was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, BMI and total energy intake.Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006, a nationally representative survey.US children (n 1961) aged 2-9 years with complete responses on the dietary frequency questionnaire.Intakes of EFF beverages were significantly associated with asthma in 2-9-year-olds. Adjusted odds of asthma in children consuming EFF beverages 5 times/week was more than five times that in children consuming these beverages 1 time/month (OR=529, P=0012). Children consuming AJ 5 times/week v. 1 time/month, adjusted for the other beverages, were more than twice as likely to have asthma (OR=243, P=0035). In contrast, there was a tendency for OJ to be protective.These results support the hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, including AJ and beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, is associated with asthma in children aged 2-9 years. Results support the mechanistic hypothesis that enFruAGE may be an overlooked contributor to asthma in children. Longitudinal studies are needed to provide evidence of causal association.


PubMed | Mount Sinai School of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Lowell and NY Medical College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nutrition & diabetes | Year: 2016

Recent research conducted by investigators at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion-a division of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-found that Regular-Soda Intake, Independent of Weight Status, is Associated with Asthma among US High School Students. On the basis of their review of prior studies, researchers hypothesized that the association may be due to high intake of sodium benzoate, a commonly used preservative in US soft drinks. But a closer look at these prior research studies suggests that there is no strong scientific evidence that the preservatives in US soft drinks are associated with asthma. Importantly, other recent research suggests that the association may be with the unpaired (excess free) fructose in high fructose corn syrup.


Gillick J.L.,NY Medical College | Wainwright J.,NY Medical College | Das K.,NY Medical College
International Journal of Rheumatology | Year: 2015

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting a significant percentage of the population. The cervical spine is often affected in this disease and can present in the form of atlantoaxial instability (AAI), cranial settling (CS), or subaxial subluxation (SAS). Patients may present with symptoms and disability secondary to these entities but may also be neurologically intact. Cervical spine involvement in RA can pose a challenge to the clinician and the appropriate role of surgical intervention is controversial. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis in the cervical spine in order to provide a better understanding of the indications and options for surgery. Both the medical and surgical treatment options for RA have improved, so has the prognosis of the cervical spine disease. With the advent of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), fewer patients are presenting with cervical spine manifestations of RA; however, those that do, now have improved surgical techniques available to them. We hope that, by reading this paper, the clinician is able to better evaluate patients with RA in the cervical spine and determine in which patients surgery is indicated. © 2015 John L. Gillick et al.


Destian S.,NY Medical College | Allmendinger A.,NY Medical College
Neuroradiology Journal | Year: 2011

The purpose of the study was to determine whether there is a difference in the appearance of the marrow signal intensity on T1 FLAIR and T1 FSE images, and if so, whether the difference is related to age. T1 FLAIR and T1 FSE sequences, obtained prospectively in 93 patients, were compared after excluding patients older than 75 years, and patients with a history of prior lumbar surgery, or a predisposing medical condition, e.g. HPV disease, multiple myeloma, osteoporosis, metastatic disease, renal failure or severe degenerative disease. All studies were performed on a 1.5 T GE Signa/Excite. All case pairs were reviewed by three board certified radiologists, each with more than five years experience in MR imaging. Regardless of age, where a difference was perceived, the T1 FLAIR image was judged darker in 88% of patients. In order to avoid misdiagnoses and/or additional unnecessary exams, it is important to recognize that marrow signal intensity may appear artificially low in normal individuals.


PubMed | NY Medical College
Type: | Journal: International journal of rheumatology | Year: 2015

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting a significant percentage of the population. The cervical spine is often affected in this disease and can present in the form of atlantoaxial instability (AAI), cranial settling (CS), or subaxial subluxation (SAS). Patients may present with symptoms and disability secondary to these entities but may also be neurologically intact. Cervical spine involvement in RA can pose a challenge to the clinician and the appropriate role of surgical intervention is controversial. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis in the cervical spine in order to provide a better understanding of the indications and options for surgery. Both the medical and surgical treatment options for RA have improved, so has the prognosis of the cervical spine disease. With the advent of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), fewer patients are presenting with cervical spine manifestations of RA; however, those that do, now have improved surgical techniques available to them. We hope that, by reading this paper, the clinician is able to better evaluate patients with RA in the cervical spine and determine in which patients surgery is indicated.


News Article | November 14, 2016
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VALHALLA, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A study funded by the Cigna Foundation and conducted by Achilles International and NY Medical College finds that running helps children with autism improve fitness and communication.

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