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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Customs officials have arrested a Russian man at Amsterdam’s international airport after dozens of poisonous snakes and frogs were found hidden in his luggage. The man, who was en route to Russia, was detained on a stopover at Schiphol airport after a trip to Brazil, the Dutch food and animal watchdog said on Wednesday. “There were dozens of live snakes, frogs, cockroaches and lizards hidden in his luggage. A large number of these animals are extremely poisonous,” the food and consumer safety authority (NVWA) said. The animals were stashed in plastic buckets with lids and placed in the man’s backpack. “The man has seriously harmed the animals by stuffing them into these plastic buckets, therefore a charge of cruelty to animals has been opened,” the NVWA said. The man remained in custody while further investigations continued. The reptiles and insects were taken to an animal shelter.


Bonants P.,Wageningen University | Streito J.-C.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Elphinstone J.,Fera | Pottier P.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 6 more authors.
EPPO Bulletin | Year: 2016

The ability of National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPOs) and their affiliated laboratories to quickly and reliably detect and identify organisms is critical for the effective performance of phytosanitary measures. Plant pest diagnostics is also essential to support the phytosanitary certification of consignments of plants and plant products exported from the EU. Access to reference material has been identified as a limitation on the ability of laboratories to develop and validate diagnostic tests and ensure the reliability of diagnostics. The EU FP7 Q-collect project worked to establish the state of the art of current phytosanitary collections, to identify gaps and propose minimum quality standards, to facilitate access to specimens and to design and build networks of reference collections. The main results of the project are presented in this paper. © 2016 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2016 OEPP/EPPO


Hoogenboom R.L.A.P.,Wageningen University | Klop A.,Wageningen UR Livestock Research | Herbes R.,NVWA | Van Eijkeren J.C.H.,National Institute of Public Health and the Environment | And 3 more authors.
Chemosphere | Year: 2015

Fires and improper drying may result in contamination of feed with PCDD/Fs and PCBs. To predict the impact of elevated feed levels, it is important to understand the carry-over to edible products from food producing animals. Therefore, a carry-over study was performed with maize silage contaminated by a fire with PVC materials, and with sugar beet pulp contaminated by drying with coal, containing particles from a plastic roof. Levels of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in the maize silage were 0.93 and 0.25ng TEQ kg-1, those in beet pulp 1.90 and 0.15ng TEQ kg-1 (both on 88% dry matter (DM)). Dairy cows (3 per treatment) received either 16.8kg DM per day of maize silage or 5.6kg DM per day of sugar beet pellets for a 33-d period, followed by clean feed for 33days. This resulted in a rapid increase of PCDD/F levels in milk within the first 10days with levels at day 33 of respectively 2.6 and 1.7pg TEQ g-1 fat for maize silage and beet pulp. Levels of dl-PCBs at day 33 were lower, 1.0 and 0.5pg TEQ g-1 fat. In the case of the maize silage, the carry-over rates (CORs) at the end of the exposure were calculated to be 25% and 32% for the PCDD/F- and dl-PCB-TEQ, respectively. For the dried beet pulp the CORs were 18% and 35%. This study shows that the carry-over of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs formed during drying processes or fires can be substantial. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Wageningen University, Wageningen UR Livestock Research, NVWA and National Institute of Public Health and the Environment
Type: | Journal: Chemosphere | Year: 2015

Fires and improper drying may result in contamination of feed with PCDD/Fs and PCBs. To predict the impact of elevated feed levels, it is important to understand the carry-over to edible products from food producing animals. Therefore, a carry-over study was performed with maize silage contaminated by a fire with PVC materials, and with sugar beet pulp contaminated by drying with coal, containing particles from a plastic roof. Levels of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in the maize silage were 0.93 and 0.25 ng TEQ kg(-1), those in beet pulp 1.90 and 0.15 ng TEQ kg(-1) (both on 88% dry matter (DM)). Dairy cows (3 per treatment) received either 16.8 kg DM per day of maize silage or 5.6 kg DM per day of sugar beet pellets for a 33-d period, followed by clean feed for 33 days. This resulted in a rapid increase of PCDD/F levels in milk within the first 10 days with levels at day 33 of respectively 2.6 and 1.7 pg TEQ g(-1) fat for maize silage and beet pulp. Levels of dl-PCBs at day 33 were lower, 1.0 and 0.5 pg TEQ g(-1) fat. In the case of the maize silage, the carry-over rates (CORs) at the end of the exposure were calculated to be 25% and 32% for the PCDD/F- and dl-PCB-TEQ, respectively. For the dried beet pulp the CORs were 18% and 35%. This study shows that the carry-over of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs formed during drying processes or fires can be substantial.


Michelsen-Huisman A.D.,Afdeling Dermatologie Allergologie G02.124 | Van Os-Medendorp H.,Afdeling Dermatologie Allergologie G02.124 | Versluis A.,Afdeling Dermatologie Allergologie G02.124 | Kruizinga A.G.,TNO | And 4 more authors.
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Dermatologie en Venereologie | Year: 2014

Unexpected reactions occur in patients with food allergy, but frequency data are scare. This prospective study investigates the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food in adults with a doctor's diagnosed food allergy. Participants complete an online questionnaire after every unexpected reaction and send in the culprit product including the food label. The product is analyzed for suspected allergens. Preliminary results show that the mean number of reactions was 1 per person per year. Most reactions occurred after consuming pre-packaged food and composite meals outdoors.© 2014 De Nederlandse Vereniging voor Dermatologie en Venereologie.


News Article | November 27, 2016
Site: phys.org

The outbreak was detected at a farm in Biddinghuizen, about 70 kilometres (43 miles) west of Amsterdam, where about 180,000 ducks were put down together with another 10,000 within a one kilometre radius, the Dutch food and safety watchdog NVWA said. "There are three other poultry farms within a three kilometre radius and they are being monitored," the NVWA added in a statement. Authorities have also imposed a ban on poultry and poultry product transport within a 10 kilometre radius, the statement said. Tests indicated that the birds were killed by an H5N8 variant of the disease "which is highly infectuous" for poultry—killing about 30 percent of infected birds—but not "very dangerous to humans", public newscaster NOS said. Earlier this month the Netherlands shuttered petting zoos and banned duck hunting as it stepped up measures to stem a bird flu outbreak blamed for killing scores of poultry and more than a thousand wild birds in the country. In the western port of Rotterdam, a park closed its animal section after several aquatic birds were found to have died from the H5N8 virus. Others still not affected have been penned in. And on the banks of Lake Markermeer, close to Amsterdam, about 1,250 wild birds were found dead earlier this month, local news reports said. The H5N1 strain of bird flu has killed more than 420 people, mainly in southeast Asia, since first appearing in 2003. Another strain of bird flu, H7N9, has claimed more than 200 lives since emerging in 2013, according to World Health Organisation figures. Avian flu severely hit the Netherlands in 2003 with health authorities destroying some 30 million birds in an effort to quash an outbreak. Around 106 million chickens are raised on Dutch poultry farms, according to the latest Dutch statistics. farms, according to the latest Dutch statistics. Explore further: Netherlands steps up measures to fight bird flu


Scholtens I.,Wageningen University | Laurensse E.,NVWA | Molenaar B.,Wageningen University | Zaaijer S.,Wageningen University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

Nowadays most animal feed products imported into Europe have a GMO (genetically modified organism) label. This means that they contain European Union (EU)-authorized GMOs. For enforcement of these labeling requirements, it is necessary, with the rising number of EU-authorized GMOs, to perform an increasing number of analyses. In addition to this, it is necessary to test products for the potential presence of EU-unauthorized GMOs. Analysis for EU-authorized and -unauthorized GMOs in animal feed has thus become laborious and expensive. Initial screening steps may reduce the number of GMO identification methods that need to be applied, but with the increasing diversity also screening with GMO elements has become more complex. For the present study, the application of an informative detailed 24-element screening and subsequent identification strategy was applied in 50 animal feed samples. Almost all feed samples were labeled as containing GMO-derived materials. The main goal of the study was therefore to investigate if a detailed screening strategy would reduce the number of subsequent identification analyses. An additional goal was to test the samples in this way for the potential presence of EU-unauthorized GMOs. Finally, to test the robustness of the approach, eight of the samples were tested in a concise interlaboratory study. No significant differences were found between the results of the two laboratories. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Hoogenboom R.L.A.P.,RIKILT Wageningen UR | ten Dam G.,RIKILT Wageningen UR | van Bruggen M.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | Jeurissen S.M.F.,National Institute for Public Health and the Environment | And 3 more authors.
Chemosphere | Year: 2016

Home produced eggs from 62 addresses in the Netherlands were investigated for the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and biphenyls (PCBs), both dioxin-like (dl) and non-dioxin-like (ndl). Compared to commercial eggs, levels were relatively high with a median of 4.6 pg TEQ g-1 fat for the sum of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs, and a highest level of 18.9 pg TEQ g-1 fat. A number of samples showed clearly elevated ndl-PCB levels with a median of 13 ng g-1 fat and a highest level of 80 ng g-1 fat. There were no clear regional differences, even though part of the samples were derived from the rather industrial Rotterdam/Rijnmond area. Based on the congener patterns, former backyard burning of waste seems the most likely source for most eggs, with two exceptions where other sources contributed to the contamination. Similar is true for the ndl-PCBs. The study shows that average levels are about ten-fold higher than commercial eggs and may substantially contribute to the intake of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs by consumers. Intervention measures to reduce the intake of these contaminants by laying hens are advised. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, NVWA and RIKILT Wageningen UR
Type: | Journal: Chemosphere | Year: 2016

Home produced eggs from 62 addresses in the Netherlands were investigated for the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and biphenyls (PCBs), both dioxin-like (dl) and non-dioxin-like (ndl). Compared to commercial eggs, levels were relatively high with a median of 4.6 pg TEQ g(-1) fat for the sum of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs, and a highest level of 18.9 pg TEQ g(-1) fat. A number of samples showed clearly elevated ndl-PCB levels with a median of 13 ng g(-1) fat and a highest level of 80 ng g(-1) fat. There were no clear regional differences, even though part of the samples were derived from the rather industrial Rotterdam/Rijnmond area. Based on the congener patterns, former backyard burning of waste seems the most likely source for most eggs, with two exceptions where other sources contributed to the contamination. Similar is true for the ndl-PCBs. The study shows that average levels are about ten-fold higher than commercial eggs and may substantially contribute to the intake of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs by consumers. Intervention measures to reduce the intake of these contaminants by laying hens are advised.

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