Nuytco Research

North Vancouver, Canada

Nuytco Research

North Vancouver, Canada

Time filter

Source Type

Lim D.S.S.,NASA | Lim D.S.S.,Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute | Brady A.L.,University of Calgary | Abercromby A.F.,NASA | And 62 more authors.
Special Paper of the Geological Society of America | Year: 2011

As humans venture back to the Moon, or onward to near-Earth objects and Mars, it is expected that the rigors of this exploration will far exceed those of Apollo. Terrestrial analogs can play a key role in our preparations for these complex voyages, since in addition to their scientifi c value, analogs afford the exploration community a means to safely prepare and test exploration strategies for future robotic and human planetary missions. Many relevant analog studies exist, and each is focused on a particular aspect of strategic development. Some analog programs such as the Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP) present the opportunity to investigate both real scientifi c and real exploration scenarios in tandem. The activities of this research program demand the use of techniques, tools, and strategies for underwater scientifi c exploration, and the challenges associated with the scientifi c exploration of Pavilion Lake are analogous to those human explorers will encounter on other planetary and small solar system bodies. The goal of this paper is to provide a historical synopsis of the PLRP's objectives, milestones, and contributions to both the scientifi c and exploration community. Here, we focus on detailing the development and deployment of an integrated science and exploration program with analog application to our understanding of early Earth systems and the preparation for future human space exploration. Over a decade of exploration and discovery is chronicled herein. © 2011 The Geological Society of America.


Lim D.S.S.,NASA | Lim D.S.S.,Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute | Warman G.L.,ExperiencePoint | Gernhardt M.L.,NASA | And 24 more authors.
Planetary and Space Science | Year: 2010

Forthcoming human planetary exploration will require increased scientific return (both in real time and post-mission), longer surface stays, greater geographical coverage, longer and more frequent EVAs, and more operational complexities than during the Apollo missions. As such, there is a need to shift the nature of astronauts' scientific capabilities to something akin to an experienced terrestrial field scientist. To achieve this aim, the authors present a case that astronaut training should include an Apollo-style curriculum based on traditional field school experiences, as well as full immersion in field science programs. Herein we propose four Learning Design Principles (LDPs) focused on optimizing astronaut learning in field science settings. The LDPs are as follows:. (1)LDP#1: Provide multiple experiences: varied field science activities will hone astronauts' abilities to adapt to novel scientific opportunities(2)LDP#2: Focus on the learner: fostering intrinsic motivation will orient astronauts towards continuous informal learning and a quest for mastery(3)LDP#3: Provide a relevant experience-the field site: field sites that share features with future planetary missions will increase the likelihood that astronauts will successfully transfer learning(4)LDP#4: Provide a social learning experience-the field science team and their activities: ensuring the field team includes members of varying levels of experience engaged in opportunities for discourse and joint problem solving will facilitate astronauts' abilities to think and perform like a field scientist. The proposed training program focuses on the intellectual and technical aspects of field science, as well as the cognitive manner in which field scientists experience, observe and synthesize their environment. The goal of the latter is to help astronauts develop the thought patterns and mechanics of an effective field scientist, thereby providing a broader base of experience and expertise than could be achieved from field school alone. This will enhance their ability to execute, explore and adapt as in-field situations require. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Lim D.S.S.,NASA | Lim D.S.S.,Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute | Brady A.L.,University of Calgary | Abercromby A.F.,NASA | And 62 more authors.
Special Paper of the Geological Society of America | Year: 2011

As humans venture back to the Moon, or onward to near-Earth objects and Mars, it is expected that the rigors of this exploration will far exceed those of Apollo. Terrestrial analogs can play a key role in our preparations for these complex voyages, since in addition to their scientific value, analogs afford the exploration community a means to safely prepare and test exploration strategies for future robotic and human planetary missions. Many relevant analog studies exist, and each is focused on a particular aspect of strategic development. Some analog programs such as the Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP) present the opportunity to investigate both real scientific and real exploration scenarios in tandem. The activities of this research program demand the use of techniques, tools, and strategies for underwater scientific exploration, and the challenges associated with the scientifi c exploration of Pavilion Lake are analogous to those human explorers will encounter on other planetary and small solar system bodies. The goal of this paper is to provide a historical synopsis of the PLRP's objectives, milestones, and contributions to both the scientific and exploration community. Here, we focus on detailing the development and deployment of an integrated science and exploration program with analog application to our understanding of early Earth systems and the preparation for future human space exploration. Over a decade of exploration and discovery is chronicled herein. © 2011 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

Loading Nuytco Research collaborators
Loading Nuytco Research collaborators