Nutrition Center

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Nutrition Center

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Nomi Y.,Ochanomizu University | Shimizu S.,Ochanomizu University | Sone Y.,Ochanomizu University | Tuyet M.T.,National Institute of Nutrition | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2012

Methanol extract obtained from Syzygium zeylanicum leaves exhibited potent antioxidant activity. The water extract obtained from this methanol extract by sequential extraction with hexane, chloroform, ethylacetate, and n-butanol also showed the strongest antioxidant activity among extracts. This water extract was further fractionated by column chromatography with various concentrations of methanol solutions. Among the 6 resultant fractions, the fraction developed with 20% methanol exhibited the most potent antioxidant activity. The one peak among the three major HPLC peaks in this fraction was isolated and purified using a preparative HPLC. The structure of a pure compound was elucidated as a novel macrocyclic ellagitannin using a 1H/13C NMR and a high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. This newly isolated compound, which was named zeylaniin A, exhibited potent antioxidant activities in the assays of DPPH, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and malonadehyde/gas chromatography. S. zeylanicum leaves can be a possible source of natural antioxidants. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center, Rashid Hospital, Tel Aviv University, AstraZeneco and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Current therapeutic research, clinical and experimental | Year: 2014

The majority of clinical trials investigating the clinical benefits of lipid-lowering therapies (LLTs) have focused on North American or western and nothern European populations. Therefore, it is timely to confirm the efficacy of these agents in other patient populations in routine clinical practice.The aim of the Direct Statin COmparison of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) Values: an Evaluation of Rosuvastatin therapY (DISCOVERY) Alpha study was to compare the effects of rosuvastatin 10 mg with those of atorvastatin 10 mg in achieving LDL-C goals in the Third Joint Task Force of European and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice guidelines.This randomized, open-label, parallel-group study was conducted at 93 centers in eastern Europe (Estonia, Latvia, Romania, Russia, Slovenia), Central and South America (Chile, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama), and the Middle East (Israel, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates). Male and female patients aged 18 years with primary hypercholesterolemia (LDL-C level, >135 mg/dL if LLT-naive or 120 mg/dL if switching statins; triglyceride [TG] level, <400 mg/dL) and a 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk >20% or a history of CHD or other established atherosclerotic disease were eligible for inclusion in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive rosuvastatin 10-mg or atorvastatin 10-mg tablets QD for 12 weeks. No formal statistical analyses or comparisons were performed on lipid changes between switched and LLT-naive patients because of the different lipid inclusion criteria for these patients. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving 1998 European LDL-C goals after 12 weeks of treatment. A subanalysis was performed to assess the effects of statins in patients who had received previous statin treatment versus those who were LLT-naive. Tolerability was assessed using laboratory analysis and direct questioning of the patients.A total of 1506 patients (52.1% women, 47.9% men; mean [SD] age, 58.2 [10.8] years) participated in the study (rosuvastatin, 1002 patients; atorvastatin, 504 patients; previous LLT, 567 patients). A significantly higher proportion of patients achieved 1998 European LDL-C goals after 12 weeks with rosuvastatin 10 mg than with atorvastatin 10 mg (72.5% vs 56.6%; P < 0.001). Similarly, more patients achieved the 2003 European LDL-C goals with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared with atorvastatin 10 mg (57.5% vs 39.2%). Rosuvastatin 10 mg was associated with a significantly greater change in LDL-C levels compared with atorvastatin 10 mg, in patients who were LLT-naive (LDL-C: -44.7% vs -33.9%; P < 0.001) and in patients who had received previous LLT (LDL-C: -32.0% vs -26.5%; P = 0.006). TG levels were also decreased with rosuvastatin 10 mg and atorvastatin 10 mg, although there was no significant difference between treatments. Similarly, there was no significant difference in the increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels between treatments. The most common adverse events overall were headache 16/1497 (1.1%), myalgia 10/1497 (0.7%), and nausea 10/1497 (0.7%).In this study in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia in clinical practice, greater reductions in LDL-C levels were achieved with a starting dose (10 mg) of rosuvastatin compared with atorvastatin 10 mg, with more patients achieving European LDL-C goals. Both treatments were well tolerated.


Hong T.K.,Pham Ngoc Thach University of Medicine | Trang N.H.H.D.,Pham Ngoc Thach University of Medicine | Dibley M.J.,University of Sydney | Sibbritt D.W.,University of Newcastle | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Pediatric Obesity | Year: 2010

Objective. To identify factors associated with overweight/obesity among adolescents in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Methods. In 2004, a cross-sectional survey was conducted using multi-stage cluster sampling. Weight and height of 2 678 students from 31 junior high schools in Ho Chi Minh City were measured. Dietary intake and physical activity were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and a physical activity questionnaire. Parental, household and neighbourhood characteristics were also collected. Factors associated with overweight/obesity in adolescents were modelled using hierarchical, multivariate logistic regression. "Survey commands" in STATA were used to account for the multi-stage cluster sampling design. Results. After adjusting for other study factors, the odds of overweight/obesity was significantly higher for male gender (OR3.1, 95% CI: 1.8, 3.8), younger age (OR3.4, 95% CI: 2.1, 5.3), schools located in wealthy districts (OR2.5, 95% CI: 1.8, 3.4), higher family economic status (OR1.9, 95% CI: 1.1, 4.9), higher parental education (OR2.0, 95% CI: 1.4, 2.9), overweight or obese parents (OR3.5, 95% CI: 1.7, 7.0), more time spent watching TV (OR4.3, 95% CI: 1.3, 14.7), frequent consumption of soft drinks (OR3.0, 95% CI: 1.6, 5.3) and more time studying after class (OR2.9, 95% CI: 1.7, 4.9). The odds of overweight/obesity was lower with the availability of fruit at home (OR0.5, 95% CI: 0.3, 0.7), frequent consumption of fruit/vegetables (OR0.3, 95% CI: 0.2, 0.4) and being physically active (OR0.5, 95% CI: 0.4, 0.8). Conclusions. Family/parental factors as well as children's lifestyle should be taken into account when planning interventions to prevent adolescent obesity. © 2010 Informa Healthcare.


While it is believed by public and health care professionals that the incidence of food allergies are on the rise, no concrete studies have been carried out in the country by far to support the claim, noted the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The studies that dealt with food allergies so far did not involve a sufficient sample size or people from different ethnicities and in most cases the studies likely overestimate the prevalence of food allergies in the given population, noted NASEM. In addition, other gastrointestinal and immune diseases, such as gluten sensitivity and lactose intolerance, are widely mistaken for food allergies. "To prioritize food allergy as a public health concern and ensure that adequate resources are directed at the issue, the extent of the problem must first be defined," said committee chair Virginia Stallings, director of the Nutrition Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. NASEM also noted that food allergies are experienced by people living in various environmental settings and therefore combined efforts of education, health care systems and food and travel industries are necessary to provide a safe environment for people with allergies. The study suggests that physicians should make use of standardized methods to diagnose food allergies and avoid using procedures like electro dermal testing and kinesiology for the purpose. Since no specific test for food allergies is available, physicians must make sure to examine the patient's health history, perform finger prick tests and oral food challenge under supervision to diagnose the hypersensitivity. A number of recent researches have noted that food allergies are developed when potential allergens like milk, eggs and peanuts are introduced to children late in their life. It is suggested in the report that clinical practice guidelines and public health authorities should make it a point to create awareness among parents about the right time to introduce allergenic food. It is also recommended that World Health Organization and the National Institutes of Health update their food allergy safety guidelines that include prevention, diagnosis and management of food allergies from time to time with the help of evidence from emerging studies. People from the food industry should also be informed about potential allergens, safety measures and how to deal with their customers on the issue. Personnel working in food establishments including grocery stores, retail food stores, restaurants and food processing sites should be trained to follow the existing food safety guidelines. Furthermore, the current labeling system that informs customers about allergens found in food products are not found effective and therefore the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration and the food industries should work together to come up with better labeling method, noted the report. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


PubMed | University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Nutrition Center and Queensland University of Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association | Year: 2016

Nutritional screening and assessment is not currently part of routine clinical practice in Vietnam. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the utility of the commonly used methods for identifying malnutrition in outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).A cross-sectional pilot study and a larger retrospective study were carried out in outpatients with COPD who were attending a respiratory clinic in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Routine clinical data were collected [body mass index (BMI), forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEVIn total, 393 outpatients had documented BMI and 29 were prospectively assessed using SGA: males, n=25; females, n=4; mean (SD) age 69.7 (9.6)years; mean (SD) BMI 21.0 (3.4)kgmMalnutrition is common in Vietnamese outpatients with COPD. A BMI threshold of <21kgm


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.cnet.com

Counter/Space is a new CNET series that puts kitchen appliances -- smart and "dumb" -- to the test. Drinking fresh juice might do great things for your health, like preventing disease. Even though there's little reliable, repeated evidence that juicing helps cleanse "toxins," boosts your immune system, or helps you lose weight, one thing is for sure: it just feels -- and tastes -- good. But buying it daily or doing a juice cleanse is crazy-expensive -- upwards of $500 a week. That's a lot more expensive than just buying a juicer and doing it yourself. So here's how to stay juiced without going broke. You have a lot of options when it comes to choosing a juicer. Your choice will probably depend on how "pure" you want your juice to be, how much cleanup you're willing to do, and (duh) how much you want to spend. So before you pass go, read this guide to buying a juicer. Centrifugal juicers use a fast-spinning blade to break down fruits and veggies before pressing them into juice. A centrifugal juicer typically: A good centrifugal juicer, like the Breville JE200XL Compact Juice Fountain, is priced around $100 (roughly £70 or AU$140) -- much cheaper than even a week's worth of store-bought juices. Cold-press juicers, like the Omega Nutrition Center, are a step up from centrifugal juicers, since they produce little to no heat in the process of juicing. So, theoretically, fewer nutrients are destroyed in the process of juicing. If you like the idea of juicing, but aren't ready to invest in a juicer, use your blender. Here's how: Juicing obsessives might be dying a little bit inside as they think, "Nooo! You're creating heat!" Like centrifugal juicing, a little heat is created, thereby "cooking" out some of the nutrients. But if you want to juice in a pinch, it works fabulously. Juicing at home can save you a lot of money in the long run, but it does require more work from you. You'll have to buy, wash, dry and cut your veggies daily (or weekly, in batches), which can be a headache for some people. So if time is money for you... Juicero is kind of like a Keurig for juicing. The company ships prepared "produce packs" to your door, so all you have to do it put it in the machine and -- poof! -- fresh juice! The catch? It's expensive. Like, $700 expensive. That doesn't include the produce packs, which are priced at $5 to $7 a pop. Eventually, we expect the price of the machine and the packs to go down. Until then, it's the easiest -- but most expensive -- way to juice at home. Me? I'll stick with the blender method.


Argiles J.M.,University of Barcelona | Busquets S.,University of Barcelona | Stemmler B.,Nutrition Center | Lopez-Soriano F.J.,University of Barcelona
Nature Reviews Cancer | Year: 2014

Cancer cachexia is a devastating, multifactorial and often irreversible syndrome that affects around 50-80% of cancer patients, depending on the tumour type, and that leads to substantial weight loss, primarily from loss of skeletal muscle and body fat. Since cachexia may account for up to 20% of cancer deaths, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms is essential. The occurrence of cachexia in cancer patients is dependent on the patient response to tumour progression, including the activation of the inflammatory response and energetic inefficiency involving the mitochondria. Interestingly, crosstalk between different cell types ultimately seems to result in muscle wasting. Some of the recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of cachexia may lead to new therapeutic approaches. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Harris D.E.,University of Southern Maine | Aboueissa A.-M.,University of Southern Maine | Walter K.,Nutrition Center | Bampton M.,University of Southern Maine
Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition | Year: 2014

Food insecurity is a health hazard for those who experience it. At the national level, households that are poor, single parent, composed of racial minorities, and located in urban areas are more likely to be food insecure. However, less is known about food insecurity's distribution at the community level. A standard food security questionnaire was used to conduct a telephone survey of food insecurity in Lewiston, Maine. Results were mapped in a geographic information system along with 2010 census data and previously collected data on Lewiston's food stores. Logistic regression analysis revealed that fewer adults and the presence of children in the household, but not measures of urbanization and community poverty, predicted lower household food security. These results demonstrate that food insecurity is more widely disturbed in Lewiston, Maine, than might have been predicted and suggest that services to mitigate the impact of food insecurity should also be widely distributed. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Binh P.N.,Nutrition Center
Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis | Year: 2011

The Vietnamese develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome (MS) at a lower BMI than other ethnicities. Thus, biomarkers that identify subjects at an increased risk of T2D independently of obesity are being sought. Recent studies show that circulating NO metabolites (NOx) are increased in T2D. We investigated whether plasma NOx levels predict insulin resistance and glucose intolerance before the development of T2D, independently of obesity. The current study was derived from a population-based study in HCMC, Vietnam, which was designed to investigate the prevalence of MS and T2D in a population aged 30-69 years. Four hundred and twenty-two subjects were recruited from the study and were stratified into 4 age- and gender-matched groups according to a glucose tolerance test {normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and T2D}. Plasma NOx concentrations were significantly increased in T2D but not in IFG or IGT compared with NGT. Multiregression analysis showed that plasma NOx levels were inversely correlated with BMI in T2D whereas no association was found between plasma NOx levels and BMI in non-diabetic subjects. Moreover, there was no correlation between plasma NOx levels and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. Plasma NOx levels did not predict glucose intolerance or insulin resistance before the development of T2D and the increase in plasma NOx levels in T2D was not caused by adiposity. Thus, plasma NOx is not a useful marker for the prediction of high-risk subjects for T2D among Vietnamese.


PubMed | Nutrition Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis | Year: 2011

The Vietnamese develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome (MS) at a lower BMI than other ethnicities. Thus, biomarkers that identify subjects at an increased risk of T2D independently of obesity are being sought. Recent studies show that circulating NO metabolites (NOx) are increased in T2D. We investigated whether plasma NOx levels predict insulin resistance and glucose intolerance before the development of T2D, independently of obesity.The current study was derived from a population-based study in HCMC, Vietnam, which was designed to investigate the prevalence of MS and T2D in a population aged 30-69 years. Four hundred and twenty-two subjects were recruited from the study and were stratified into 4 age- and gender-matched groups according to a glucose tolerance test {normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and T2D}.Plasma NOx concentrations were significantly increased in T2D but not in IFG or IGT compared with NGT. Multiregression analysis showed that plasma NOx levels were inversely correlated with BMI in T2D whereas no association was found between plasma NOx levels and BMI in non-diabetic subjects. Moreover, there was no correlation between plasma NOx levels and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.Plasma NOx levels did not predict glucose intolerance or insulin resistance before the development of T2D and the increase in plasma NOx levels in T2D was not caused by adiposity. Thus, plasma NOx is not a useful marker for the prediction of high-risk subjects for T2D among Vietnamese.

Loading Nutrition Center collaborators
Loading Nutrition Center collaborators