Numerof and Associates Inc.

St. Louis, MO, United States

Numerof and Associates Inc.

St. Louis, MO, United States
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Sackman J.E.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Pharmaceutical Technology Europe | Year: 2013

The bio-phamaceutical business outlook in South Korea remains positive.


Abrams M.N.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Healthcare financial management : journal of the Healthcare Financial Management Association | Year: 2012

Care paths map the critical actions and decision points across a patient's course of medical treatment; their purpose is to guide physicians in the delivery of high-quality care while reducing care costs by avoiding services that do not contribute meaningfully to positive outcomes. Each care path development initiative should be led by a respected physician champion, whose specialty is in the area of the care episode being mapped, with the support of a clinician project manager. Once the care path has been developed and implemented, the finance leader's role begins in earnest with the tracking of financial and clinical data against care paths.


Abrams M.N.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Trustee : the journal for hospital governing boards | Year: 2012

Applying market dynamics to health care would bring much-needed transparency to the industry.


Abrams M.N.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry | Year: 2010

Physicians which provide technical input, identify unmet needs, and perhaps most critically, conduct clinical trial administration and oversight. The growing corporate challenge is to mitigate compliance risk, and to ensure that increased enforcement scrutiny, disclosure requirements, and procedural safeguards don't alienate these valuable resources. The study analyzed the characteristics of medical device clinical investigators whose study sites were judged, in FDA inspection, to be entirely compliant with applicable regulations. A structured selection framework should also ensure that compensation of selected partners is clearly related to the match between their qualifications and the requirements of the study. Using an appropriately structured framework enables companies to base professional relationships on real value. This approach provides transparency by establishing a basis for valuing and managing a business relationship, addresses COI concerns, and helps provide quality data.


Rothenberg S.E.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry | Year: 2010

Compliance as business strategy can be a way for companies to distinguish and differentiate themselves. This concept should prompt companies to create an organizational framework that redefines core processes and makes compliance part of management's accountabilities. The effect of an investigation on a medical device company in terms of time, cost, and potential liability, ongoing compliance measures are an imperative. Successful processes need strong executive sponsorship and need to be integrated into the larger organization's standard operations. Effective compliance practices should be viewed as addressing the unmet needs of certain stakeholders in the market. Compliance should be part of an overall approach that addresses the market's increasing demands for improved product safety and transparency. Compliance as a business strategy uses existing and new compliance requirements to go beyond minimal collection or reporting obligations.


Sackman J.E.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Pharmaceutical Technology | Year: 2013

Southeast Asia is a growing pharmaceutical market. Much like Latin America, the countries of southeast Asia, especially the members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN: Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam), have taken initial steps towards seeking more harmonized regulation of pharmaceutical and medical-device industries. There are still significant differences, however, in how these markets are regulated, and these countries vary widely in their stage of development.


Abrams M.N.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Trustee : the journal for hospital governing boards | Year: 2011

As hospitals bundle services, administrators will have to take a close look at clinical costs. Resolving conflicts with physicians will require strong leadership.


Platt A.,Illinois Institute of Technology | Hood C.,Illinois Institute of Technology | Citrin L.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011 | Year: 2011

Social networking websites have become a vital means of communication that can provide information on various topics. The real time nature of the information published on social networking websites coupled with their accessibility as a publishing platform make them a powerful tool for information gathering. Furthermore, many individuals utilize these sorts of platforms to share their knowledge and opinions with others. While this information is useful, there exist a number of challenges to effectively use social networks to gather information about a topic. We propose a methodology that automatically detects sub-topics and groups the social networking messages accordingly. © 2011 IEEE.


Merlo L.J.,University of Florida | Merlo L.J.,Professionals Resource Network Inc. | Cummings S.M.,Numerof and Associates Inc. | Cottler L.B.,University of Florida
American Journal on Addictions | Year: 2014

Background and Objectives Prescription drug addiction is a significant problem affecting healthcare professionals. The purpose of the present study was to identify common mechanisms of prescription drug diversion by pharmacists, in order to facilitate the development of effective prevention programs and policies for this high-risk group. Methods A total of 32 pharmacists (71% male) who were being monitored by their State professional health program (PHP) due to substance-related impairment participated in anonymous guided group discussions. Results Participants documented six primary methods of drug diversion by pharmacists: (1) taking expired drugs that can no longer be sold by the pharmacy and are awaiting disposal; (2) assuming responsibility for managing the pharmacy inventory and/or changing inventory records to prevent detection of missing drugs; (3) forging prescriptions for themselves, family members, friends, or customers in order to gain access to the drugs; (4) using "sleight of hand" techniques to acquire drugs while filling prescriptions or shelving products; (5) blatantly stealing drugs from the pharmacy, even in front of coworkers or video cameras, and (6) collecting patients' unused medications and keeping them. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Efforts to address the problem of prescription drug abuse and diversion by pharmacists should be expanded in order to safeguard pharmacies and the patients they serve. Future research should extend this study to larger samples and assess best practices for decreasing prescription drug diversion by pharmacists with addiction. (Am J Addict 2014;23:123-128) "A friend of mine, in the [impaired professionals monitoring] program was also a pharmacist and he does stand-up comedy on the side. He's a funny guy, but in his routine he says, 'I'm a pharmacist. Unlike most people, I love to go into work!"'-Study participant © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.


Abrams M.N.,Numerof and Associates Inc.
Trustee : the journal for hospital governing boards | Year: 2013

Accountable care is changing how boards protect their hospitals' continued viability.

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