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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are high-potential adsorbents for toxic chemical remediation, energy storage, air separation, and multiple other military and civilian applications. However, the utility of these materials is limited by existing production economics. A scalable production process is required for the adoption of this material class into next-generation gas adsorption systems. Furthermore, the system integration of MOFs requires tight control over macroporosity and particle size. Established techniques for zeolites and activated carbon do not apply to MOFs, and alternative approaches must be developed.


Patent
NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2014-08-04

A metal organic framework (MOF) includes a coordination product of a metal ion and an at least bidentate organic ligand, where the metal ion and the organic ligand are selected to provide a deliverable adsorption capacity of at least 70 g/l for an electronic gas. A porous organic polymer (POP) includes polymerization product from at least a plurality of organic monomers, where the organic monomers are selected to provide a deliverable adsorption capacity of at least 70 g/l for an electronic gas.


Patent
NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2015-12-01

A metal-organic framework (MOF) structure comprising at least one metal ion and at least one multidentate organic ligand which is coordinately bonded to said metal ion, and a scaffold.


A porous material, including metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and porous organic polymer (POP), with reactivity with or sorptive affinity towards (a) electronic gas to substantially remove or abate electronic gas in an electronic gas-containing effluent, or (b) contaminants in a stream of electronic gas to substantially remove the contaminants from a stream of electronic gas and increase the purity of said electronic gas, or (c) trace mercury contaminant in a hydrocarbon stream to substantially remove said mercury contaminant and increase the purity of said hydrocarbon stream. MOFs are the coordination product of metal ions and multidentate organic ligands, whereas POPs are the product of polymerization between organic monomers.


Patent
NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2015-08-17

A metal organic framework (MOF) includes a coordination product of a metal ion and an at least bidentate organic ligand, where the metal ion and the organic ligand are selected to provide a deliverable adsorption capacity of at least 70 g/l for an electronic gas. A porous organic polymer (POP) includes polymerization product from at least a plurality of organic monomers, where the organic monomers are selected to provide a deliverable adsorption capacity of at least 70 g/l for an electronic gas.


Patent
NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2014-10-16

Adsorption systems providing a capacity of at least 200 g/L for oxygen-containing mixtures, or an oxygen-nitrogen selectivity of at least 1.4:1 or at least 1:2 with an adsorbed capacity of at least 0.6 mmol/g at 4 bar and 22 C.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project searches for better materials to efficiently and safely store gases used in semiconductor manufacturing. Currently these gases are stored in tanks at low pressures in dilute concentrations for safety reasons, which requires the use of many tanks that need to be frequently refilled. This increases the cost of semiconductor manufacturing which drives up the cost of consumer electronics. Porous materials, which soak up gases like bath sponges soak up water, can be used to store these gases in larger concentrations while maintaining safety. However, the number of porous materials that we can use to potentially store these gases is enormous (i.e., hundreds of millions) and so quickly finding the best material requires advanced computational screening methods. This project will computationally generate millions of hypothetical porous materials and screen them for their ability to store gases used in semiconductor manufacturing at industrially relevant temperatures and pressures. The computationally screening data will be used to synthesize and test an optimal material in the laboratory, which could subsequently be manufactured at larger scale.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project will be the cheaper production of electronics and a safer working environment in semiconductor manufacturing facilities. This will open the door to designing porous materials for other gas storage applications in such areas such as adsorptive heat exchange, carbon capture, and commodity gas transportation. Even more broadly, the successful determination of an optimal material via large-scale computational screening will further validate the utility of ?big data? in the modern scientific enterprise.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 1.25M | Year: 2014

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in the development of a new hazardous gas storage and delivery system for semiconductor fabrication that will significantly promote worker health and safety benefits at a reduced cost. The new system incorporates a new class of ultra-high performing absorbents, namely Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs), that will greatly mitigate the environmental and public health risks by reducing incidents of toxic gas release, chances of equipment damage, and fabrication facility evacuation. Moreover, the use of MOFs enables an increase in the storage capacity while providing savings in ventilation energy, and reducing the risk of leakages over both high pressure mechanical cylinders and sub-atmospheric carbon-based storage. Given the current vast market share of activated carbon cylinders, the higher capacity MOF filled cylinders offer the prospect of substantial decreased in per wafer production costs by minimizing gas cylinder change-outs and fabrication facility downtime. Furthermore, this technology represents the first large scale commercial application for MOFs, thus opening the doors for this promising class of materials for other gas storage applications.



This project aims to increase the capacity of gas cylinders for the storage and delivery of highly toxic gases, such as arsine (AsH3), phosphine (PH3), and boron trifluoride (BF3), that are commonly used in semiconductor fabrication. As a safety measure, these highly toxic gases are currently stored at low pressure in activated carbon-filled cylinders. However, the capacity of activated carbon adsorbents is severely limited by their ill-defined internal pore structure. NuMat is developing higher capacity gas cylinders by focusing on the following key technical objectives: 1) Design highly porous, well-defined, crystalline MOF absorbents to be integrated into cylinders, allowing for high capacity storage of these highly toxic gases at sub-atmospheric pressures, 2) Develop industrially relevant MOF scale-up procedures to minimize the cost of production, 3) Maximize the volumetric storage of MOFs in cylinders by developing high density MOF pellets, and 4) Integrate high density MOF pellets into cylinders to displace the lower performing activated carbon filled cylinders currently used this commercial application. Additionally, the technical milestones achieved in this project will help to establish the necessary foundation for incorporating this class of ultra-high performing materials (MOFs) into other gas storage applications.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project searches for better materials to efficiently and safely store gases used in semiconductor manufacturing. Currently these gases are stored in tanks at low pressures in dilute concentrations for safety reasons, which requires the use of many tanks that need to be frequently refilled. This increases the cost of semiconductor manufacturing which drives up the cost of consumer electronics. Porous materials, which soak up gases like bath sponges soak up water, can be used to store these gases in larger concentrations while maintaining safety. However, the number of porous materials that we can use to potentially store these gases is enormous (i.e., hundreds of millions) and so quickly finding the best material requires advanced computational screening methods. This project will computationally generate millions of hypothetical porous materials and screen them for their ability to store gases used in semiconductor manufacturing at industrially relevant temperatures and pressures. The computationally screening data will be used to synthesize and test an optimal material in the laboratory, which could subsequently be manufactured at larger scale. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project will be the cheaper production of electronics and a safer working environment in semiconductor manufacturing facilities. This will open the door to designing porous materials for other gas storage applications in such areas such as adsorptive heat exchange, carbon capture, and commodity gas transportation. Even more broadly, the successful determination of an optimal material via large-scale computational screening will further validate the utility of ?big data? in the modern scientific enterprise.


News Article | April 15, 2015
Site: www.builtinchicago.org

Shutterstock Two Northwestern University-born cleantech startups walked away from yesterday’s Clean Energy Challenge with half of the $1 million made available for funding. AMPY, an Evanston-based startup that creates a wearable device designed to track one’s kinetic energy in order to recharge his or her smartphone and other USB-powered devices, scored $200,000. Likewise, NuMat Technologies, a Skokie-based startup with technology that limits the need to highly compress gases, netted $300,000. "To us, the award represents the recognition and support of the broader clean energy community in Chicago. It's a great feeling, but comes with the understanding that we need to deliver on our technology," Patrick Fuller, lead technologist at NuMat Technologies, said in an email. "The funding will provide us with the resources we need to design, manufacture, and validate prototype systems to be used in the capture of environmentally hazardous gases." As we reported last Friday, the event, held at Venue SIX10, is put on by the Clean Energy Trust, a Chicago-based nonprofit organization that seeks to foster cleantech innovation in the Midwest through startup investment, technology commercialization, and energy policy. The $1 million set aside for possible investment in the 14 participating startups was the largest amount in the event’s five-year history. AMPY entered the event as a startup successfully-funded by Kickstarter, surpassing its goal of $100,000 in October of last year. Tejas Shastry, CEO and co-founder of AMPY, said his six-member team appreciates the validation the award lends. Furthermore, he said the funding will help AMPY realize its vision for growth.  “The funding will help us scale over the next few months in two ways: in an expanding our team, which will allows us to further our vision of taking our technology and integrating it directly into wearable devices and other devices on the market," he said. "And second, it will help us with scaling our production of AMPY and being able to make more and ship more out as we get into the back to school and holiday season this fall." Have a tip for us or want to share news about your company? Email us via tips@builtin.com.

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