a Nucleus of High Performance in Sport

São Paulo, Brazil

a Nucleus of High Performance in Sport

São Paulo, Brazil
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

PubMed | a Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, b Red Bull Brazil Football and State University Londrina
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of sports sciences | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adding vertical/horizontal plyometrics to the soccer training routine on jumping and sprinting performance in U-20 soccer players. The vertical jumping group (VJG) performed countermovement jumps (CMJ), while the horizontal jumping group (HJG) executed horizontal jumps (HJ). Training interventions comprised 11 sessions, with volume varying between 32 and 60 jumps per session. The analysis of covariance revealed that CMJ height and peak force improved only in the VJG, and that HJ distance and peak force improved in both groups. Velocity in 20 m (VEL 20 m) did not improve in either group; however, velocity in 10 m (VEL 10 m) presented a moderate positive effect size (ES = 0.66) in the HJG, while the ES was large (1.63) for improvement in the 10-20 m acceleration in the VJG, and it was largely negative (-1.09) in the HJG. The transference effect coefficients (calculated by the equation: TEC = result gain (ES) in untrained exercise/result gain (ES) in trained exercise) between CMJ and VEL 20 m and ACC 10-20 m were 1.31 and 2.75, respectively. The TEC between HJ and VEL 10 m, VEL 20 m and ACC 0-10 m were 0.44, 0.17 and 0.44, respectively. The results presented herein indicate that the plyometric training-axis is decisive in determining neuromechanical training responses in high-level soccer players.


PubMed | a Nucleus of High Performance in Sport
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of sports sciences | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study was to test which specific type of exercise (i.e., jump squat (JS) or half-squat (HS)) is more effective at maintaining speed and power abilities throughout a preseason in soccer players. Twenty-three male soccer players were randomly allocated into two groups: JS and HS. The mean propulsive power, vertical jumping ability, and sprinting performance were evaluated before and after 4weeks of a preseason period. The optimum power loads for the JS and HS exercises were assessed and were used as load-references. The soccer players performed 10 power oriented training sessions in total. Both JS and HS maintained power in JS and speed abilities (P>0.05, for main effects and interaction effect) as indicated by ANCOVA. Both groups demonstrated reduced power during HS (ES=-0.76 vs. -0.78, for JS and HS, respectively); both groups improved acceleration (ACC) from 5 to 10m (ES=0.52). JS was more effective at reducing the ACC decrements over 0-5m (ES=-0.38 vs. -0.58, for JS and HS, respectively). The HS group increased squat jump height (ES=0.76 vs. 0.11, for HS and JS, respectively). In summary, JS is more effective in reducing the ACC capacity over very short sprints while HS is more effective in improving squat jump performance. Both strategies improve ACC over longer distances. New training strategies should be implemented/developed to avoid concurrent training effects between power and endurance adaptations during professional soccer preseasons.

Loading a Nucleus of High Performance in Sport collaborators
Loading a Nucleus of High Performance in Sport collaborators