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Rotar N.,Nuclearelectrica | Badescu V.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest
International Journal of Green Energy | Year: 2011

The passive house (PH) concept has been developed in Germany since 1991. In the following years, the concept spread out successfully in other Western and Central European countries with similar climate. Do the design solutions developed in Germany ensure the fulfillment of PH standard requirements when implemented in areas with different climates, such as South-Eastern Europe? This paper provides a preliminary answer. First, general climate conditions are compared for 22 towns in Germany and Romania, respectively. The main conclusion is that climate data cannot provide enough information to decide whether the existing German PH design solutions will perform similarly well in Romania. Further analysis is done to estimate the energetic performance of a prototype passive building when located in any of the 22 towns of Germany and Romania. The energetic performance is computed by using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) software developed by the Passive House Institute of Darmstadt. The prototype passive building is AMVIC PH built in 2009 in Bragadiru (near Bucharest, Romania). It appears that the empirical design solutions developed in Germany may be relaxed (for example, the thermal insulation of the envelope may be reduced) when implemented for latitudes lower than 45 North. This is mainly due to the more abundant solar radiation in winter at these latitudes. © 2011 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Badescu V.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Badescu V.,Romanian Academy of Sciences | Rotar N.,Nuclearelectrica
Journal of Energy Engineering | Year: 2012

The first passive house (PH) was built in Germany in 1991. Since then several empirical design solutions have been developed, meeting the requirements of the PH standard proposed by the Passive House Institute (PHI) of Darmstadt, Germany. These design solutions have spread throughout central and western Europe and tend to be implemented in areas with a quite different climate than Germany's, such as southeastern Europe. This paper focuses on the question of whether the German design solutions would ensure the fulfillment of PH standard requirements in the latitudes of Romania. The paper compares general climate conditions for 22 towns in Germany and Romania. Further analysis is performed by estimating the energetic performance of a prototype passive building located in any of those 22 towns. The prototype passive building is AMVIC PH built in 2008 in Bragadiru (near Bucharest, Romania). It appears that the design solutions developed in Germany may be relaxed (for example, the thermal insulation may be reduced) when implemented for latitudes lower than 45 N. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Badescu V.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Badescu V.,Romanian Academy of Sciences | Rotar N.,Nuclearelectrica | Budea S.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest
Sustainable Cities and Society | Year: 2016

The Passivhaus (PH) concept was developed in the 1990s in Germany. Tens of Passivhauses are now built in Eastern Europe and the technology transfer raises well-known as well as specific problems, related to the difference of climate. Most previous studies about the dependence of the PH heating demand on climate have been performed by using the Koppen-Geiger climate classification. Here a more recent classification based on climate zones and climate types is used. Several tens of localities have been selected, covering all climate zones and types of Germany and two countries of Eastern Europe (Romania and Ukraine). An existing Romanian PH has been defined as a prototype and it has been conceptually moved in all localities. Simulations are performed by using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) developed by the Passive House Institute of Darmstadt. For given climate zone and climate type, the PH heating demand clearly depends on latitude, in all three countries. A linear dependence between the PH heating demand and latitude may be used in first approximation, and this assumption works better in the climate of Eastern Europe than in Germany. A simple empirical rule is proposed for the estimation of the heating demand of a given PH. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Badescu V.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Badescu V.,Romanian Academy of Sciences | Rotar N.,Nuclearelectrica | Udrea I.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest
Energy Efficiency | Year: 2015

The first Passive House (PH) was built in 1990/1991 in Darmstadt-Kranischstein (Germany). It was the first real-size implementation of a concept proposed by Wolfgang Feist. Since then, several empirical design solutions have been developed by the Passive House Institute (PHI) of Darmstadt. This paper deals with the feasibility of the PH concept in Southern Hemisphere. The paper compares general climate conditions for 13 European localities and 38 localities in South America, South Africa, mainland Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand. Further analysis is performed by estimating the energy performance of a prototype passive building when located in any of these localities. The prototype passive building is AMVIC PH built in 2008 in Bragadiru (Romania). The energy performance is evaluated by using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) developed by PHI. Passive buildings located in Tasmanian and South American localities at latitudes higher than 53° have a higher heating demand than European localities at similar latitudes. New Zealand and South American localities at latitudes lower than 53° generally have lower heating demand than European localities at the same latitude. The cooling demand is generally smaller in Southern Hemisphere than in Northern Hemisphere. Passive buildings placed in Tasmania, New Zealand, and South America do not require cooling while those located in South Africa and mainland Australia require a reduced amount of cooling. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Source

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