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Nanni C.,Unit of Nuclear Medicine | Boriani L.,Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute | Salvadori C.,Infectious Diseases Unit | Zamparini E.,Infectious Diseases Unit | And 8 more authors.
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | Year: 2012

Purpose Antibiotic therapy in patients affected by discitis is often empirical. Therefore, early evaluation of response to therapy is important. In many patients inflammatory indexes are low during all the phases of the diseases or are altered by concomitant diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the possible role of FDG PET/CT for the early evaluation of response to therapy in patients affected by infective discitis, in comparison to C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels. Methods Enrolled in the study were 38 patients diagnosed with haematogenous infective discitis. Of the 38 patients, 7 had tubercular infection, 1 fungal infection and 30 pyogenic discitis. Four patients were excluded because the second PET/CT scan was not performed. Thus 34 patients (18 women, mean age 64 years) were analysed. All the patients included underwent a FDG PET/CT scan and determination of CRP level at baseline and again 2 to 4 weeks after the start of therapy. The PET results in terms of SUV of the first and second scans (SUV1 and SUV2) and delta-SUVmax were compared to the inflammatory indexes and clinical status during therapy. Results The mean SUVmax at diagnosis was 8.6±3.7. The mean CRP level at diagnosis was 3.8±3.8 mg/dl. A progressive clinical response was seen in 26 patients and 8 patients showed no response. SUV1 was not correlated with the baseline CRP level (CRP1, p00.7) and SUV2 was not correlated with the CRP level at the time of the second scan (CRP2, p0 0.4). In responders, SUV2 and CRP2 were significantly lower than SUV1 and CRP1 (p<0.0001 and p00.001, respectively). ROC curves for delta-SUVmax showed a sensitivity of 82 % and a specificity of 82 % with a cut-off of 34 %. ROC curves for SUV2 showed a sensitivity of 83 % and a specificity of 46% with a cut-off of 6.4. ROC curves for delta-CRP showed a sensitivity of 67%and a specificity of 89%with a cut-off of 74 %. ROC curves for CRP2 showed a sensitivity of 65%and a specificity of 70 % with a cut-off of 0.7 mg/dl. No statistically significant difference was found between delta-SUVmax AUC and delta-CRPAUC (p00.5). Conclusion Delta-SUVmax provided a higher sensitivity and specificity for identifying responders. SUV2 provided comparable sensitivity, but significantly lower specificity. CRP level performed less well for identifying responders. There was no significant difference in the global performance of the two tests (delta-SUVmax AUC and delta-CRP AUC). However, the higher sensitivity of delta-SUVmax for the early identification of responders may have an important clinical impact in guiding antibiotic therapy especially in patients with a noninformative CRP test at diagnosis. © Springer-Verlag 2012.


Paparo F.,E.O. Ospedali Galliera | Piccardo A.,Unit of Nuclear Medicine | Clavarezza M.,Unit of Medical Oncology | Piccazzo R.,University of Genoa | And 4 more authors.
Clinical Imaging | Year: 2013

We report a case of a primary signet ring cell carcinoma (PSRCC) of the small bowel in a patient with long-standing Crohn's disease, describing computed tomography (CT)-enterography (CTE) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT features of this rare tumor. CTE demonstrated submucosal thickening of a long ileal segment with preserved mural stratification. PET/CT examination showed increased 18F-FDG uptake in the affected ileal loop, hypermetabolic abdominal and mediastinal lymphadenopathies, and multiple hypermetabolic bone lesions. Iliac crest osteo-medullary biopsy revealed bone marrow infiltration by "signet ring" cells with intestinal differentiation. Double-balloon enteroscopy was used to obtain biopsies that confirmed the ileal origin of the PSRCC. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Mauri G.,Interventional Imaging | Cova L.,Interventional Imaging | Tondolo T.,Interventional Imaging | Ierace T.,Interventional Imaging | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2013

Context: Percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) may be useful in treating patients with metachronous metastatic lymph nodes in the neck. Objective: Our objective was to assess PLA as a treatment of difficult-to-treat metachronous cervical lymph node metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma. Design and Setting: We conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data at a public hospital. Patients: Fifteen patients with previous resection of papillary thyroid carcinoma with elevated serum levels of thyroglobulin (Tg) or anti-Tg antibodies (TgAbs) and 24 metachronous nodal metastases treated between September 2010 and April 2012 were followed with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). Intervention: Intervention was PLA. Outcome Measures: Technique feasibility and technical success were evaluated. Tg/TgAb serum levels and 18FDG-PET/ CT, and CEUS appearance were assessed at 6 and 12 months and compared with baseline. Complications were recorded. Results: PLA was always feasible, and technical success was achieved in all patients. At 6 months, local control was achieved in 11 of 15 patients (73%), with 6 (40%) having serum Tg/TgAb normalized (P = .017 vs baseline). Whereas 20 of 24 (83%) nodes were negative at 18FDG-PET/CT and CEUS (P < .001 vs baseline), 4 were 18FDG-PET/CT-positive (3 also CEUS-positive). At the 12-month follow-up, local control was achieved in 10 of 14 patients (71.4%). Sixteen of 20 nodes (80%) were negative at 18FDG-PET/CT and CEUS (P < .001 vs baseline), 4 were 18FDG-PET/CT-positive (2 also CEUS-positive). Four of 10 (40%) patients had normalization of serum Tg/TgAb (P = .098 vs baseline). No major complications occurred. Conclusions: PLA is potentially feasible, safe, and effective for the treatment of metachronous cervical nodal metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma. This procedure may reduce or delay a large number of highly invasive repeat neck dissections. Copyright © 2013 by The Endocrine Society.


PubMed | Unit of Vascular Surgery, University of Ferrara, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, IRCCS of Neurosciences and Unit of Translational Surgery
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of vascular surgery. Venous and lymphatic disorders | Year: 2016

Increased ventricle volume and brain hypoperfusion are linked to neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that in patients with restricted jugular flow, surgical restoration may reduce brain ventricle volume, because it should improve the pressure gradient, hence promoting cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption into the venous system.The effects of restoring the jugular flow were assessed by means of a validated echocardiography with color Doppler (ECD) protocol of flow quantification, magnetic resonance venography, and single-photon emission computed tomography combined with computed tomography (SPECT-CT). The main outcome measurement was the cerebral ventricle volume blindly assessed at SPECT-CT. Secondary outcomes were brain perfusion in the whole brain and in another 12 cerebral regions. The mean follow-up of the SPECT-CT and ECD parameters was 30 days. Patency rate was subsequently monitored by means of the same ECD protocol every 3 months.Among 56 patients (28 male and 28 female; mean age, 44 10 years) with ECD screening positive for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency due to nonmobile jugular leaflets, 15 patients were excluded from the initial cohort because they did not meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 41 patients, 27 patients (14 male, 13female; mean age, 48 7 years) underwent endophlebectomy and autologous vein patch angioplasty. Omohyoid muscle section was performed when appropriate. The control group comprised 14 patients matched by age and gender (8 male, 6 female; mean age, 44 11 years) who were not treated. Comorbidity was multiple sclerosis without significant differences in relapsing remitting (RR) and secondary progressive (SP) clinical course among groups. In the control group, neither ECD nor SPECT-CT showed any significant changes at follow-up. On the contrary, in the group operated on, the collateral flow index went from 70% to 30% (P< .0003) thanks to improved flow through the internal jugular vein. Correspondingly, ventricle volume dramatically decreased in the treated group (from 34 14 cm(3) to 31 13 cm(3); P< .01). The effect was much more evident in the RR subgroup (P= .009), whereas in the SP subgroup, it was not significant. Perfusion was found to be improved in the surgical group with respect to controls, particularly in the occipital and parietal regions of the RR subgroup (P< .0001 and P= .017, respectively), but not in the SP subgroup. The probability of reducing ventricle size is increased by 13-fold (P< .03) when restoration of the jugular flow achieves a postoperative collateral flow index 20%. Finally, the 18-month patency rate was 74%.Fixing the flow in the jugulars in patients with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency might significantly reduce brain ventricle volume and improve cerebral perfusion. These changes are more evident in patients in the earlier stages of neurodegenerative disease.


PubMed | Unit of Pathology, Unit of Thoracic Surgery, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Medical Physics Unit and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery | Year: 2017

False-negative (FN) uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can be divided into those cases related to technological limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) and those related to inherent properties of neoplasms. Our goal was to clarify possible factors causing FN PET results in patients with solid-type pulmonary adenocarcinomas (PAs).From January 2007 to December 2014, of the 255 patients with p-stage-1 non-small-cell lung cancer observed and treated (surgically) in our institution, we retrospectively reviewed the PET/computed tomography (CT) records, the clinical information, the preoperative thin-section CT images, and the pathological features [classified by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) subtyping criteria] of 94 consecutive solid-type p-stage-1 PAs. Univariable and multivariable logistic analyses were used to identify and weigh the independent predictors of the PET findings using the following variables: body weight, blood glucose level, tumour size, tumour location, and histological classification.There were 58 men and 36 women (mean age=68.78.9 years, range 42-85). Considering the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) 2.5 as a PET-positive result, 77 lesions (81.9%) proved PET positive and 17 lesions (18.1%), PET negative (with SUVmax<2.5). Overall, the median SUVmax value was 5.7 [interquartile range (IQR) 2.8-10.3]. Higher SUVmax values (P<0.001) were observed in those PAs larger than 2cm in their major axis (median SUVmax=9.0; IQR 4.6-14.6); in PAs<2cm, the median SUVmax was 4.1; IQR 2.2-5.9. When clustering the cohort in two histological classes (class A, colloid/mucinous/lepidic versus class B, micropapillary/solid/acinar/papillary), the radiometabolic patterns were significantly different (median SUVmax=2.8; IQR 1.7-4.9 in class A vs median=7.4 IQR 4.5-13.9 in class B, P<0.001). Significant PET FN rates were reported in (i) PAs measuring <2cm in their major axis (27.9%), (ii) lesions located in the lower zones of the lung (31.0%), and (iii) class A tumours (37.5%). In the multivariable logistic analysis, histological type (IASLC/ATS/ERS aggregated clusters) proved to be the only independent relevant factor for determining whether PET results were negative or positive (OR:7.23, 95% CI: 2.05-25.43, P=0.002).The IASLC/ATS/ERS pattern significantly influences FDG uptake in solid-type p-stage-1 PAs. The fact that colloid/mucinous/lepidic adenocarcinomas have a notable tendency to produce negative findings on PET scans warrants particular attention.


Cencini E.,University of Siena | Fabbri A.,University of Siena | Guerrini S.,University of Siena | Mazzei M.A.,University of Siena | And 2 more authors.
European Journal of Haematology | Year: 2016

Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) strongly associated with HIV infection, even if cases in other immunosuppressed patients such as solid organ transplant recipients and in immunocompetent individuals have been increasingly reported. Current treatment strategy for HIV-negative patients is similar to DLBCL as first-line treatment, but durable remissions are seldom observed. Anthracycline-containing regimens could be too toxic for elderly patients and/or with cardiac failure, because a non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (NLD) could be used in this field. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor currently approved for patients with multiple myeloma and relapsed mantle-cell lymphoma, has recently showed clinical activity in PBL patients. Herein, we report a rapid and long-term remission of a PBL patient with cardiac failure and that had previously received a double kidney transplant, treated front-line with COMP (with a NLD substituted for doxorubicin) followed by subcutaneous bortezomib consolidation. We suggest first-line treatment outcome is determinant for PBL patients. Bortezomib has a promising role and should be incorporated in future clinical trials and NLD could represent a suitable option for patients with cardiac failure or high cardiovascular risk. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Campenni A.,Unit of Nuclear Medicine | Violi M.A.,Messina University | Ruggeri R.M.,Messina University | Sindoni A.,Unit of Nuclear Medicine | And 3 more authors.
Nuclear Medicine Communications | Year: 2010

Objective: 99mTc-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) has been reported to show considerable clinical utility in the study of many neoplastic diseases. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible role of 99mTc-MIBI in the initial follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) for detecting residual thyroid uptake and/or loco-regional/distant metastases. Methods: Eighty-two patients with DTC (61 women, 21 men; mean age: 49 years) were studied after total or near-total thyroidectomy (not earlier than 3 months after thyroidectomy but before they underwent radioiodine therapy). About 20min after the intravenous administration of 370MBq of 99mTc-MIBI, planar images (and, if necessary, tomographic images, single photon emission tomography) of the cervical and thoracic regions were recorded and compared with posttherapy radioiodine scanning and thyreoglobulin serum levels. Results: MIBI scans detected thyroid remnants in 53 of 82 patients (65%) and metastatic foci in 10 of 11 (91%) patients, in whom a standard activity of 1110 MBq of 131I administered following MIBI scan had shown the presence of thyroid remnants or metastatic foci, respectively. One metastatic patient was false negative for both MIBI scan and post-131I dose whole body scan. Conclusion: Our data indicate that an MIBI scan has a high sensitivity in detecting metastatic lesions from DTC. Therefore, an MIBI scan after thyroidectomy and immediately before radioiodine treatment may be clinically useful for choosing the best therapeutic approach in terms of either ablative or therapeutic 131I activity for both thyroid remnants and/or DTC metastases and for evaluating surgical reappraisal of metastatic lymph nodes. © 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Gozzetti A.,Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese | Rossi V.,Unit of Nuclear Medicine | Cerase A.,Unit NINT Neuroimaging and Neurointervention | Papini G.,Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese | And 2 more authors.
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases | Year: 2012

A 71 year old female with multiple myeloma presented with back pain seven year after autologous stem cell transplant. Skeletal bone survey and magnetic resonance imaging did not show a relapse that was evidenced by CT/PET. Lenalidomide as single agent induced a complete disappearance of the lesions 6 months later and confirmed after one year at CT/PET.


PubMed | Unit of Nuclear Medicine
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging | Year: 2012

Antibiotic therapy in patients affected by discitis is often empirical. Therefore, early evaluation of response to therapy is important. In many patients inflammatory indexes are low during all the phases of the diseases or are altered by concomitant diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the possible role of FDG PET/CT for the early evaluation of response to therapy in patients affected by infective discitis, in comparison to C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels.Enrolled in the study were 38 patients diagnosed with haematogenous infective discitis. Of the 38 patients, 7 had tubercular infection, 1 fungal infection and 30 pyogenic discitis. Four patients were excluded because the second PET/CT scan was not performed. Thus 34 patients (18 women, mean age 64 years) were analysed. All the patients included underwent a FDG PET/CT scan and determination of CRP level at baseline and again 2 to 4 weeks after the start of therapy. The PET results in terms of SUV of the first and second scans (SUV1 and SUV2) and delta-SUVmax were compared to the inflammatory indexes and clinical status during therapy.The mean SUVmax at diagnosis was 8.6 3.7. The mean CRP level at diagnosis was 3.8 3.8 mg/dl. A progressive clinical response was seen in 26 patients and 8 patients showed no response. SUV1 was not correlated with the baseline CRP level (CRP1, p = 0.7) and SUV2 was not correlated with the CRP level at the time of the second scan (CRP2, p = 0.4). In responders, SUV2 and CRP2 were significantly lower than SUV1 and CRP1 (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.001, respectively). ROC curves for delta-SUVmax showed a sensitivity of 82 % and a specificity of 82 % with a cut-off of 34 %. ROC curves for SUV2 showed a sensitivity of 83 % and a specificity of 46 % with a cut-off of 6.4. ROC curves for delta-CRP showed a sensitivity of 67 % and a specificity of 89 % with a cut-off of 74 %. ROC curves for CRP2 showed a sensitivity of 65 % and a specificity of 70 % with a cut-off of 0.7 mg/dl. No statistically significant difference was found between delta-SUVmax AUC and delta-CRP AUC (p = 0.5).Delta-SUVmax provided a higher sensitivity and specificity for identifying responders. SUV2 provided comparable sensitivity, but significantly lower specificity. CRP level performed less well for identifying responders. There was no significant difference in the global performance of the two tests (delta-SUVmax AUC and delta-CRP AUC). However, the higher sensitivity of delta-SUVmax for the early identification of responders may have an important clinical impact in guiding antibiotic therapy especially in patients with a noninformative CRP test at diagnosis.


PubMed | Unit of Nuclear Medicine and University of Siena
Type: Case Reports | Journal: European journal of haematology | Year: 2016

Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) strongly associated with HIV infection, even if cases in other immunosuppressed patients such as solid organ transplant recipients and in immunocompetent individuals have been increasingly reported. Current treatment strategy for HIV-negative patients is similar to DLBCL as first-line treatment, but durable remissions are seldom observed. Anthracycline-containing regimens could be too toxic for elderly patients and/or with cardiac failure, because a non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (NLD) could be used in this field. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor currently approved for patients with multiple myeloma and relapsed mantle-cell lymphoma, has recently showed clinical activity in PBL patients. Herein, we report a rapid and long-term remission of a PBL patient with cardiac failure and that had previously received a double kidney transplant, treated front-line with COMP (with a NLD substituted for doxorubicin) followed by subcutaneous bortezomib consolidation. We suggest first-line treatment outcome is determinant for PBL patients. Bortezomib has a promising role and should be incorporated in future clinical trials and NLD could represent a suitable option for patients with cardiac failure or high cardiovascular risk.

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