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News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Colon Cancer Foundation, a New York-based nonprofit dedicated to the fight against colorectal cancer, today announced a massive new public awareness campaign called “Protect Your Butt!” The new campaign will focus on the Colon Cancer Foundation’s commitment to saving lives through colon cancer awareness, prevention, and translational research programs focused on a cure and optimal care for those most affected by this disease. The campaign also will break through all stigmas and fears around colon cancer and screening, and significantly increase awareness of the disease. Over 50,000 Americans die from colon cancer each year making colon cancer the #2 cancer in the USA. The kickoff event for the Protect Your Butt! Campaign is the “World’s Largest Booty Shake,” scheduled for Wednesday, March 1, in Central Park. The World’s Largest Booty Shake is expected to draw thousands of colon cancer survivors, those passionate about the cause, and more. “Our kick-off booty shake event is just the beginning,” said Dr. Thomas Weber, the foundation’s founder. “Too many people avoid talking about colon cancer because they are unaware or scared. Our new multifaceted Protect Your Butt! Campaign will reach millions of Americans through large events, social media, email marketing, and television. We are literally going to shake this up, raise money for the cure, and save lives.” The World’s Largest Booty Shake is sponsored by the Mount Sinai Health System, and partners of the Colon Cancer Foundation, Epigenomics and Bracco. These three leading health providers focus on colon cancer prevention, screening, and research. “We are proud to be the presenting sponsor for the World’s Largest Booty Shake,” said David Greenwald, MD, Director of Clinical Gastroenterology and Endoscopy at The Mount Sinai Hospital. “Colon cancer is the No. 2 cancer killer in the United States. By raising awareness and encouraging screening, we can save more lives and change this statistic.” The World’s Largest Booty Shake event starts at noon on Wednesday, March 1, at the Central Park Band Shell, south of Bethesda Terrace between 66th and 72nd streets. Headlining the World’s Largest Booty Shake will be rising R&B star Mark MK and DJ Theo, who will debut the new R&B single: “PYB – Protect Your Butt!” The new single can be downloaded on iTunes, Spotify, Tidal, Amazon, and other services, and part of the proceeds will go towards colon cancer research. All money raised during the Protect Your Butt! Campaign helps to raise awareness of the nation’s second leading cancer killer and provides funds for colorectal cancer research, education, and prevention programs for the underserved. For more information about the Colon Cancer Foundation, visit http://www.coloncancerchallenge.org. The Colon Cancer Foundation (coloncancerchallenge.org) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization registered in New York state and listed by the Federal IRS as a public charity dedicated to reducing colorectal cancer incidence and death. Its mission includes supporting research into the causes and cures for colorectal cancer, increasing public awareness, educating the public about the importance of early detection and forming strategic partnerships in the fight against colorectal cancer. The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services—from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the “Honor Roll” of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 “Best Hospitals” issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation’s top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Epigenomics is a molecular diagnostics company focused on blood-based detection of cancers using its proprietary DNA methylation biomarker technology. The company develops and commercializes diagnostic products across multiple cancer indications with high medical need. Epigenomics' lead product, Epi proColon, is a blood-based screening test for the detection of colorectal cancer. Epi proColon has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is currently marketed in the United States, Europe, and China and selected other countries. Epigenomics’ second product, Epi proLung®, is in development as a blood-based test for lung cancer detection. Bracco Imaging S.p.A., part of the Bracco Group, is one of the world’s leading companies in the diagnostic imaging business. Headquartered in Milan, Italy, Bracco Imaging develops, manufactures and markets diagnostic imaging agents and solutions that meet medical needs. Bracco Imaging offers a product and solution portfolio for all key diagnostic imaging modalities: X-ray Imaging (including Computed Tomography-CT, Interventional Radiology, and Cardiac Catheterization), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS), and Nuclear Medicine through radioactive tracers. The diagnostic imaging portfolio is completed by a range of medical devices and advanced administration systems for contrast imaging products.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Joan M. Mack, MD, Radiologist, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. She is a highly trained and qualified radiologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work. Dr. Joan M. Mack has been in practice for more than 35 years and is currently serving patients as a Radiologist at Mercy Health Systems in Darby, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, she served as Director at Mercy Philadelphia Hospital. Dr. Joan M. Mack’s career in medicine began in 1981, when she graduated with her Doctor of Medicine Degree from St. George’s University in Grenada, West Indies. Upon relocating to the United States, Dr. Mack completed residencies at the Methodist Hospital and at the University of Connecticut Medical Center, before completing her fellowship at New York University, and a second year at UCON Medical Center in Nuclear Medicine. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in her field, Dr. Mack maintains professional memberships with the Radiological Society of North America, the American College of Radiology, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the American College of Nuclear Physicians, and the Drug Information Association. Dr. Mack has had many articles and medical papers published, and attributes her great success to her dedication and desire to make a difference in the lives of her patients. Learn more about Dr. Mack by reading her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


SAINT-GENIS-POUILLY, France, March 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Advanced Accelerator Applications S.A. (NASDAQ:AAAP) (“AAA” or the “Company”), an international specialist in Molecular Nuclear Medicine (MNM), today announced that its product NETSPOT® (gallium Ga 68 dotatate) has been included in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (“NCCN”) Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology version 1.2017 update for the evaluation of neuroendocrine tumors (“NETs”). NCCN® is a not-for-profit alliance of leading cancer centers in the U.S. that produces authoritative guidelines for oncology physicians for the treatment of all major malignancies, and for their detection, prevention, risk reduction and associated supportive care. Eric Liu, MD, FACS, neuroendocrine tumor surgeon and Co-Director, The Neuroendocrine Institute at Rocky Mountain Cancer Center and HealthOne, stated, “As a physician that sees more than 400 patients with NETs per year, I am very grateful to have NETSPOT® available and included in the NCCN Guidelines®. This advance in imaging capability provides treating physicians with enormous insights, enabling better directed surgeries and enhanced decision making regarding different therapeutic options. Ultimately, I believe the use of NETSPOT® will lead to improved outcomes for patients.” Lale Kostakoglu, MD, MPH, Chief, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, stated, “We, as molecular imagers, are very pleased to see this valuable imaging modality be finally integrated into a national management algorithm for neuroendocrine tumors. The ability to image these patients with this compound is crucial to the success of any molecular imaging program. I believe this technology will lead to significant changes in patient management and will guide decisions for targeted therapies.” Stefano Buono, Chief Executive Officer of AAA said, “We are pleased to see NETSPOT® acknowledged by NCCN® as a clinically relevant tool for the evaluation of patients with NETs. The inclusion of NETSPOT® in the NCCN Guidelines® for NETs should facilitate coverage from private payors and increase access for many patients. The NET community has been very supportive of the innovation NETSPOT® brings and it is our goal to make it available in as many markets as possible.” NETSPOT® was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) on June 1, 2016, 23 months from the first pre-Investigational New Drug meeting with the Agency. AAA and its radiopharmacy partners around the U.S. are now delivering 400 doses of NETSPOT® per month. The company is seeking to grow its network of radiopharmacy partners from 20 sites to more than 40 sites over the first half of 2017. In December 2016, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) granted NETSPOT® Transitional Pass-Through status under an “A-code” (A9587) for drug reimbursement, effective January 1, 2017. Additionally, the same Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (“HCPCS”) “A Code” will be used on claims to private payers. NETSPOT®, after radiolabeling with Ga 68, is a radioactive diagnostic agent indicated for use with positron emission tomography (PET) for localization of somatostatin receptor positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in adult and pediatric patients. There are no Contraindications for use. Warnings and Precautions include Ga 68 dotatate contributing to a patient’s overall long-term cumulative radiation exposure. Long-term cumulative radiation exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The safety of Ga 68 dotatate was evaluated in three single center studies and in a survey of the scientific literature. No serious adverse reactions were identified. NETSPOT® is available in two forms: As a drug kit for reconstitution using a Ga 68 generator, and as a ready-to-use injection delivered from local radiopharmacies in select metropolitan areas. The kit has been designated as an orphan drug by the EMA and the FDA. For full prescribing information for NETSPOT® please refer to: http://go.usa.gov/cSywA. Advanced Accelerator Applications is an innovative radiopharmaceutical company that develops, produces and commercializes Molecular Nuclear Medicine products. AAA’s lead investigational therapeutic candidate, Lutetium Lu 177 Dotatate (Lutathera®), is a novel MNM compound that AAA is currently developing for the treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors, a significant unmet medical need. Founded in 2002, AAA has its headquarters in Saint-Genis-Pouilly, France. AAA currently has 22 production and R&D facilities able to manufacture both diagnostics and therapeutic MNM products, and has 500 employees in 13 countries (France, Italy, UK, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Poland, Portugal, The Netherlands, Belgium, Israel, U.S. and Canada). AAA reported sales of €88.6 million in 2015 (+27% vs. 2014) and sales of €81.3 million for the first 9 months of 2016 (+23% vs. 9 months 2015). AAA is listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the ticker “AAAP”. For more information, please visit: www.adacap.com. This press release may contain forward-looking statements. All statements, other than statements of historical facts, contained in this press release, including statements regarding the Company's strategy, future operations, future financial position, future revenues, projected costs, prospects, plans and objectives of management, are forward-looking statements. The words "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "plan," "predict," "project," "target," "potential," "will," "would," "could," "should," "continue," and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. Forward-looking statements reflect the Company's current expectation regarding future events. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results, events or developments to be materially different from any future results, events or developments expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to, changing market conditions, the successful and timely completion of clinical studies, the timing of our submission of applications for regulatory approvals, EMA, FDA and other regulatory approvals for our product candidates, the occurrence of side effects or serious adverse events caused by or associated with our products and product candidates; our ability to procure adequate quantities of necessary supplies and raw materials for Lutetium Lu 177 Dotatate and other chemical compounds acceptable for use in our manufacturing processes from our suppliers; our ability to organize timely and safe delivery of our products or product candidates by third parties; any problems with the manufacture, quality or performance of our products or product candidates; the rate and degree of market acceptance and the clinical utility of Lutetium Lu 177 Dotatate and our other products or product candidates; our estimates regarding the market opportunity for Lutetium Lu 177 Dotatate, our other product candidates and our existing products; our anticipation that we will generate higher sales as we diversify our products; our ability to implement our growth strategy including expansion in the U.S.; our ability to sustain and create additional sales, marketing and distribution capabilities; our intellectual property and licensing position; legislation or regulation in countries where we sell our products that affect product pricing, taxation, reimbursement, access or distribution channels; regulatory actions or litigations; and general economic, political, demographic and business conditions in Europe, the U.S. and elsewhere. Except as required by applicable securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Reston, Virginia - Researchers at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, have demonstrated that cardiac amyloidosis (abnormal deposits of proteins in the heart), which is notoriously difficult to diagnose, can be visualized noninvasively with positron emission tomography (PET) using the radiotracer fluorine-18 (F-18)-florbetaben. The study is published in the November issue of "The Journal of Nuclear Medicine." Amyloidosis eventually leads to dysfunction of the affected organs. When the heart is affected, the prognosis is extremely poor. Dr W. Phillip Law, the corresponding author of the study, explains, "The first signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific and usually attributed to other conditions. Currently, there is no definitive test to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis other than an invasive biopsy of the heart muscle. Cardiac amyloidosis is often not diagnosed until late in the course of the disease, as the typical appearance of the infiltrated myocardium on echocardiography and MRI can be mistaken for other more prevalent disorders." While previous research of amyloid radiotracers in the heart has used normal subjects as controls, this study compared subjects with thickened heart muscle secondary to amyloid deposition to those with thickened myocardium due to hypertensive heart disease. Being able to visualize and quantify amyloid deposition in heart muscle may provide an accurate and noninvasive means of diagnosing the disorder and also may be useful in monitoring disease burden. F-18-florbetaben PET was performed in 14 subjects. Target-to-background standardized uptake values (SUV) ratio and percentage myocardial radiotracer retention were higher in amyloid patients compared to hypertensive control subjects. A cut-off value of 40 percent was able to differentiate between cardiac amyloid patients and hypertensive control subjects. The study shows that F-18-florbetaben PET imaging can accurately identify and differentiate between cardiac amyloidosis and hypertensive heart disease. Percentage myocardial F-18-florbetaben retention was an independent determinant of myocardial dysfunction in cardiac amyloidosis. Looking ahead, Dr Law envisions, "Tailored molecular imaging with PET using florbetaben may significantly simplify the diagnostic algorithm for patients with suspected cardiac amyloidosis. Future studies investigating florbetaben uptake pattern in other [non-amyloid, non-hypertensive] causes of heart muscle thickening would further clarify the specificity of florbetaben." He adds, "The relationship of PET quantification of florbetaben retention in the heart, with histological amyloid plaque burden, may provide another means of monitoring disease and could also be useful in monitoring response of cardiac amyloid to treatment, but further research needs to be undertaken to investigate this relationship." Authors of the article "Cardiac amyloid imaging with 18F-florbetaben positron emission tomography: a pilot study" include W. Phillip Law, University of Queensland and Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, and William Y.S. Wang, Peter T. Moore, Peter N. Mollee, and Arnold C.T. Ng, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. This work was funded in part by a Princess Alexandra Hospital Research Foundation grant and a National Health and Medical Research Council early career fellowship. Please visit the SNMMI Media Center to view the PDF of the study, including images, and more information about molecular imaging and personalized medicine. To schedule an interview with the researchers, please contact Laurie Callahan at (703) 652-6773 or lcallahan@snmmi.org. Current and past issues of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine can be found online at http://jnm. . About the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, a vital element of today's medical practice that adds an additional dimension to diagnosis, changing the way common and devastating diseases are understood and treated and helping provide patients with the best health care possible. SNMMI's more than 17,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit http://www. .


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Reston, Va. - In the featured article of the March 2017 issue of "The Journal of Nuclear Medicine," researchers demonstrate that a new positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, gallium-68 (Ga-68)-pentixafor, can quickly and non-invasively identify life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques. The tracer binds to the CXCR4 receptor on inflammatory cells present in atherosclerotic plaques--making it possible to find and treat atherosclerosis early. Atherosclerosis represents the main cause of heart attack and stroke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every year about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack and 800,000 have a stroke. Stroke kills more than 130,00 Americans a year, and about 610,000 die from cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis develops over decades with the progressive accumulation of lipids, inflammatory cells and connective tissue within the inner layer of arterial walls leading to a local thickening of the vascular wall called atherosclerotic plaque. These plaques can remain asymptomatic for years, but an inflammatory reaction can develop causing the plaques to rupture and stimulate clot formation. If a clot completely blocks an artery, no oxygen can reach the downstream tissue--resulting in the sudden development of heart attack or stroke. The challenge is to identify patients with these dangerous atherosclerotic plaques before a heart attack or stroke occurs. Currently, there is no clinically available non-invasive imaging technique specifically to detect inflammation. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET is being used but has important limitations. It is taken up by many cells other than inflammatory cells, including cardiac and brain cells. The strong signal present in the organs next to the arteries limits the precise analysis of the radiotracer uptake in atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, patients need to fast at least six hours before FDG injection to avoid interferences with blood sugar and muscular uptake of the tracer that impair image quality. "Ga-68-pentixafor binds more specifically to inflammatory cells than FDG and does not require the patient to fast for six hours before imaging," explains Fabien Hyafil, MD, PhD, of Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany, and Bichat University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. In the study, the specific binding of Ga-68-pentixafor to inflammatory cells located in atherosclerotic plaques was first validated in an animal model. Seven atherosclerotic rabbits and five controls were imaged on a PET-MRI system after injection of the tracer. Resulting images clearly showed inflammation in plaques in the abdominal aorta and right carotid artery of the atherosclerotic rabbits. The researchers also confirmed with a small number of human patients that the radiotracer detected atherosclerotic plaques located in their carotid arteries. Hyafil emphasizes, "This new radiotracer will strongly facilitate the imaging of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques with PET and hopefully support the early detection and treatment of atherosclerosis, thus preventing heart attack or stroke." Authors of the article "Imaging the cytokine receptor CXCR4 in atherosclerotic plaques with the radiotracer 68Ga-pentixafor for positron emission tomography" include Fabien Hyafil, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany, and Bichat University Hospital, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; Jaroslav Pelisek, Iina Laitinen, Miriam Mohring; Michael Kallmayer, Johannes Fischer, Christine Baumgartner, and Hans-Henning Eckstein, of Klinikum Rechts der Isar; Margret Schottelius, Katja Steiger, Andreas Poschenrieder, Johannes Notni, and Hans-Jürgen Wester, Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany; Yvonne Döring and Emiel P.C. van der Vorst, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany; Christian Weber, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Technische Universität München, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, DZHK partner site Munich Heart Alliance, and Maastricht University, The Netherlands; Christoph Rischpler, Stephan G. Nekolla, and Markus Schwaiger, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Bichat University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Technische Universität München, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, DZHK partner site Munich Heart Alliance. This work was supported by the European Research Council Executive Agency through a Multimodal Molecular Imaging Advanced Research Grant (Grant number 294582), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB 824-B5 and SFB 1123-A1), and Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf Forschung through a high-risk, high-volume grant. Please visit the SNMMI Media Center to view the PDF of the study, including images, and more information about molecular imaging and personalized medicine. To schedule an interview with the researchers, please contact Laurie Callahan at (703) 652-6773 or lcallahan@snmmi.org. Current and past issues of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine can be found online at http://jnm. . The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, a vital element of today's medical practice that adds an additional dimension to diagnosis, changing the way common and devastating diseases are understood and treated and helping provide patients with the best health care possible. SNMMI's more than 17,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit http://www. .


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Compared to white fat, brown body fat burns through energy at an extraordinary rate. However, until now the proportion of brown fat in humans was thought to be quite small. Now a study conducted by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has shown: The quantity of brown fat in humans is three times greater than previously known. As a consequence, new obesity and diabetes drugs that activate brown adipose tissue are expected to be more effective. For the study, published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, nearly 3,000 PET scans of 1644 patients were analyzed. PET is an acronym for positron emission tomography, a method widely used in oncology. PET scans enable the visualization of metabolic activity in the body. Since a tumor often has a different energy metabolism to healthy tissue, PET scans can be used to demonstrate the presence of metastases. "A byproduct of PET scans is that they allow us to see active brown adipose tissue," according to Dr Tobias Fromme from the Else-Kröner-Fresenius Center at the Technical University of Munich -- "brown adipose tissue absorbs lots of sugar, and we can observe this activity through the scans." For example, it is conceivable that a drug could reduce excessive blood sugar levels in diabetics by increasing the activity of the brown fat. Similarly, it is conceivable that patients with obesity could use the high rate of energy combustion through brown fat to melt away their excess weight -- at least to a certain extent. "In any event, the outlook for the efficacy of drugs in brown adipose tissue can be adjusted upwards," said the researcher. Some people activate brown body fat more than others The analysis of the PET scans also revealed that some groups of persons have an easier time activating their brown fat than others, or even have more of it in the first place. As several previous studies have already shown, women more frequently have active brown fat than men. Similarly, thinner and younger persons have larger proportions of brown fat. Furthermore, brown fat does not react with the same level of activity in overweight individuals or in the elderly. "However, active brown fat occurs with far greater frequency in about five percent of patients than in the general population," said Fromme -- "in these patients, 50% of the scans showed these active fatty tissue proportions." The researcher suggested that this may point to a possible explanation for the phenomenon that some persons seem to gain weight after only one extra piece of cake, while others can gorge on sweets without gaining at all -- different body weights despite having the same diet. "Ultimately, with medication that activates brown adipose tissue, we must anticipate that some groups of people are likely to benefit from an additional activation of brown fat more than others," the author of the study explained. "So far, we don't know the causes for a particular individual to have especially active brown fat." A newly discovered factor may prove key to solving this riddle: The researchers showed for the first time that brown fat activity is affected by a variable known as creatinine clearance, which is related to renal function. "Further basic research is still needed," said Fromme" -- but one hypothesis is that there may be signaling substances that affect both brown fat and the kidneys." Carlos Gerngross, Johanna Schretter, Martin Klingenspor, Markus Schwaiger and Tobias Fromme: Active brown fat during 18FDG-PET/CT imaging defines a patient group with characteristic traits and an in-creased probability of brown fat redirection, Journal of Nuclear Medicine 01/2017. DOI: 10.2967/jnumed.116.183988


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Jennifer Rodriguez Ferrer, MD, Radiologist to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Jennifer Rodriguez Ferrer is a highly trained and qualified radiologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work, especially radiology and nuclear medicine. Dr. Ferrer is currently serving patients within Hospital Pavía Yauco in Yauco, Puerto Rico. Dr. Ferrer obtained her Medical Degree in Mexico, and subsequently completed a residency in Radiology at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County in Chicago, followed by a residency in Nuclear Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She then undertook her fellowship training at Johns Hopkins Health System. She is double board certified by the American Board of Radiology and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in her field, Dr. Ferrer maintains professional memberships with the American College of Radiology, the American Medical Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology. She attributes her success to her dedication, research, patient care, education, and making a difference. When she is not assisting her patients, Dr. Ferrer enjoys snowboarding, traveling, going to the beach, and spending time with her family and friends. Learn more about Dr. Jennifer Rodriguez Ferrer here: http://iahcp.com/8135950.html and be sure to read her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


Feyer P.,Nuclear Medicine | Jordan K.,Martin Luther University of Halle Wittenberg
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2011

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) continues to be one of the most feared side effects of chemotherapy. Inadequately controlled CINV can have a significant negative impact on quality of life and can in some cases compromise adherence to treatment. However, the repercussions of CINV for patients are often underestimated. Advances in our understanding of the physiology of CINV and the identification of risk factors have greatly contributed towards improvements in the control of CINV. A number of antiemetic agents are currently available for the prophylaxis and treatment of CINV, including 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists corticosteroids, neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists, dopamine receptor antagonists, benzodiazepines, neuroleptics and cannabinoids. With the correct use of these agents, CINV can be prevented to a great extent; however, adherence to guidelines is disappointingly low. Furthermore, a significant number of patients still experience nausea and vomiting despite optimal treatment. More effective therapies are, therefore, greatly needed, with the ultimate goal of attaining complete control of CINV. This review focuses on the current understanding of CINV, problems associated with its management and the status of promising antiemetic therapies. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

There's an old adage that one person's trash is another person's treasure. Take the case of a Canadian physics lab that realized the radioactive waste it had been stockpiling was actually a rare, expensive, potentially cancer-destroying medical isotope. "It was literally putting two and two together," said Paul Schaffer, an associate lab director at TRIUMF, a particle physics research facility in Vancouver. Though TRIUMF largely focuses on using its particle accelerator to research nuclear physics, it also has a life sciences division, where Schaffer works. This allowed him to make the connection that the work the lab's physicists were doing had a valuable byproduct: a rare medical isotope, called actinium. "The physicists wanted to understand what happens when, for example, you throw protons against a target and you get a soup of weird stuff," Schaffer told me at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston. "There was literally a contaminant that was in the waste train and they didn't know what to do with it, so they were hanging on to it in order to allow it to decay away." That contaminant was actinium, which usually requires a lengthy, intensive process to extract from radioactive waste—researchers in the US have made small quantities out of the leftover uranium from the Manhattan Project, Schaffer said. But the particle accelerator was producing it incidentally, without any uranium, and in much higher quantities than ever before. Because it's so expensive and difficult to produce, researchers haven't been able to spend a lot of time investigating its possible medical applications. But the handful of research that has been done shows it's worth taking a closer look at. One study, published in December in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, studied two late-stage cancer patients whose tumors had spread throughout their bodies. Over the course of several treatments with actinium injected into the patient, the tumors were obliterated: It was a really small trial, so there's a lot more research to be done to figure out if this treatment is safe and effective, but the results were promising. TRIUMF is now working on using its existing infrastructure to produce more and more actinium so this potential treatment can be properly investigated. "Maybe in 10 years, we have enough of this actinium and 1,000 hospitals have done their clinical trials and decide, you know what, we can't do this. It's not good,"  Schaffer said. "There could be other isotopes we can look at, so that's the idea. Just keep walking it forward."


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Nuclear Medicine Therapeutics Market (Alpha Emitters, Beta Emitters and Brachytherapy) - Analysis and Forecasts (2015-2020)" report to their offering. The global nuclear medicine therapeutics market is expected to grow from an estimated $1.24 billion in 2015 to $2.38 billion in 2020, at an estimated compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 13.91%. Major factors for the growth of the market are increasing use of

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