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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and leading cyber security company FireEye are inking a partnership to explore new areas in cyber security research, and to develop courses to meet the rising demand for cyber security professionals needed to help defend critical networks. Besides carrying out joint research projects and developing new curriculum in cybersecurity, the partnership will offer scholarships, and provide internship opportunities to NTU students. The collaboration was signed today at one of the world's largest gathering of information security professionals, the RSA Conference in California, the United States, by NTU's Dean of the College of Science, Professor Ling San, and Kevin Mandia, Chief Executive Officer at FireEye. NTU Provost, Professor Freddy Boey said, "Today, the world is more connected than ever before, from internet banking to critical infrastructure, and this creates new vulnerabilities. NTU's new partnership with FireEye will not only find better ways to address the rising cyber threats, but also groom the next generation of future-ready cybersecurity professionals." The collaboration will focus on efforts to automatically classify malicious software (malware) and to study new methods that attackers use to infiltrate computer systems. This includes developing solutions to identify hidden malware behaviour that could evade regular detection methods. Eric Hoh, President of Asia Pacific Japan at FireEye said, "In the wake of the U.S. presidential election, it is clear that cyber security is the next domain in which national sovereignty will be challenged. This is cause for concern in the Asia Pacific region, where attackers spend a median of 520 days inside organizations before they are discovered. To improve, organizations must apply a combination of technology, threat intelligence, and -- most crucially -- expertise. Southeast Asia faces a shortage of cyber security expertise, and this collaboration will help bolster the ranks of those that defend Singapore networks." Mr David Koh, Chief Executive of the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore said, "This NTU-FireEye partnership brings together the strengths of both academia and industry to offer cutting-edge cybersecurity research as well as robust training to develop cybersecurity talent. It is a welcomed move to ensure we have a pool of skilled manpower with deep cybersecurity capabilities for Singapore." A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district. FireEye is the intelligence-led security company. Working as a seamless, scalable extension of customer security operations, FireEye offers a single platform that blends innovative security technologies, nation-state grade threat intelligence, and world-renowned Mandiant® consulting. With this approach, FireEye eliminates the complexity and burden of cyber security for organizations struggling to prepare for, prevent, and respond to cyber attacks. FireEye has over 5,600 customers across 67 countries, including more than 40% of the Forbes Global 2000. FireEye and Mandiant are registered trademarks or trademarks of FireEye, Inc. in the United States and other countries. All other brands, products, or service names are or may be trademarks or service marks of their respective owners. This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements related to expectations, beliefs, benefits, plans and objectives with respect to the partnership between Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and FireEye. Readers should not place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements, which are based upon beliefs and information as of the date of this release. These forward-looking statements are subject to change as a result of new information, future events or other circumstances and are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. In addition, these forward-looking statements are made as of the date hereof and NTU and FireEye specifically disclaim any obligation or intention to update the forward-looking statements to reflect events that occur or circumstances that exist after the date of this release.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

MCLEAN, VA and SINGAPORE--(Marketwired - February 09, 2017) - Smart technologies, such as sensors to improve workplace safety and artificial intelligence to aid courtrooms, could emerge from a new research partnership between Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and The MITRE Corporation from the United States. MITRE is a not-for-profit organization that operates federally funded research and development centers in the U.S., providing the US government with engineering, technical and scientific expertise in areas of defence, aviation, homeland security, U.S. courts, healthcare and cybersecurity. NTU and MITRE signed two research agreements today at MITRE's McLean campus in Virginia, U.S., signed by NTU Provost Professor Freddy Boey and MITRE's Senior Vice President Lillian Zarrelli Ryals. The joint research partnership aims to develop innovative technologies to support Singapore's Smart Nation ambitions and improve safety in workplaces, and in Judicial Engineering, which aims to improve productivity and processes for the Singapore courts. Prof Boey said the tie-up brings Singapore a step closer to achieving its Smart Nation vision as the country develops new technologies to tackle critical challenges such as labour shortfall and a rapidly aging workforce. "This new partnership brings together MITRE's strengths in smart technologies and judiciary engineering with NTU's expertise in systems engineering as well as our track record in sustainable and intelligent technologies," said Prof Boey. "Partnering with the best global players like MITRE for interdisciplinary research is important as NTU continues to develop innovative solutions relevant for Singapore and Asia." MITRE's Senior Vice President Ms Ryals said, "MITRE looks forward to strengthening its relationship with NTU by entering into new research partnerships focused on judicial systems and personnel/workplace safety. NTU's extremely strong technical expertise, combined with MITRE's systems engineering acumen, will aid both organizations in tackling the most difficult global problems in these domains." The partnership between NTU and MITRE will look into area of Judicial Engineering, where NTU researchers will work with Singapore's courts to study how technology can help to improve court operations and to increase the productivity of the courts. New technologies to be explored include artificial intelligence and machine learning, court analytics and decision support systems as well as cybersecurity. The second thrust of the tie-up will be a focus on secure smart technologies such as sensors, diverse data sources, analytic technologies, and decision support tools. These smart technologies aim to improve workplace and personnel safety through providing critical safety information gathered through sensors, analytics and other data sources. For example, smart sensors could gather data on the number of employees in an office building and large installations like the airport and seaport, so as to generate the ideal work environment in terms of oxygen levels, brightness of lighting and ambient temperature based on demand in an area. In the event of an incident such as a fire, the information picked up by the smart sensors could also help fire safety officers ensure the safe evacuation of everyone. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district. The MITRE Corporation is a private, not-for-profit organization that operates research and development centers for the US government. We provide technical expertise in defense, systems engineering, aviation, cybersecurity, critical infrastructure protection, enterprise modernization, and healthcare. With 70 locations around the world, MITRE collaborates with partner nations, the international community, academia, and research institutions to strengthen national and global security. In 2015, MITRE opened MITRE Asia Pacific Singapore (MAPS), its first international research and development center in Singapore. Learn more at www.mitre-ap.sg


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an ultrafast high-contrast camera that could help self-driving cars and drones see better in extreme road conditions and in bad weather. Unlike typical optical cameras, which can be blinded by bright light and unable to make out details in the dark, NTU's new smart camera can record the slightest movements and objects in real time. The new camera records the changes in light intensity between scenes at nanosecond intervals, much faster than conventional video, and it stores the images in a data format that is many times smaller as well. With a unique in-built circuit, the camera can do an instant analysis of the captured scenes, highlighting important objects and details. Developed by Assistant Professor Chen Shoushun from NTU's School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, the new camera named Celex® is now in its final prototype phase. "Our new camera can be a great safety tool for autonomous vehicles, since it can see very far ahead like optical cameras but without the time lag needed to analyse and process the video feed," explained Asst Prof Chen. "With its continuous tracking feature and instant analysis of a scene, it complements existing optical and laser cameras and can help self-driving vehicles and drones avoid unexpected collisions that usually happens within seconds." Asst Prof Chen unveiled the prototype of Celex® last month at the 2017 IS&T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging (EI 2017) held in the United States. It received positive feedback from the conference attendees, many of whom are academia and top industry players. A typical camera sensor has several millions pixels, which are sensor sites that record light information and are used to form a resulting picture. High-speed video cameras that record up to 120 frames or photos per second generate gigabytes of video data, which are then processed by a computer in order for self-driving vehicles to "see" and analyse their environment. The more complex the environment, the slower the processing of the video data, leading to lag times between "seeing" the environment and the corresponding actions that the self-driving vehicle has to take. To enable an instant processing of visual data, NTU's patent-pending camera records the changes between light intensity of individual pixels at its sensor, which reduces the data output. This avoids the needs to capture the whole scene like a photograph, thus increasing the camera's processing speed. The camera sensor also has a built-in processor that can analyse the flow of data instantly to differentiate between the foreground objects and the background, also known as optical flow computation. This innovation allows self-driving vehicles more time to react to any oncoming vehicles or obstacles. The research into the sensor technology started in 2009 and it has received $500,000 in funding from the Ministry of Education Tier 1 research grant and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Proof-of-Concept grant. The technology was also published in two academic journals published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the world's largest technical professional organisation for the advancement of technology. With keen interest from the industry, Asst Prof Chen and his researchers have spun off a start-up company named Hillhouse Tech to commercialise the new camera technology. The start-up is incubated by NTUitive, NTU's innovation and enterprise company. Asst Prof Chen expects that the new camera will be commercially ready by the end of this year, as they are already in talks with global electronic manufacturers. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes -- the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI). Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: phys.org

Unlike typical optical cameras, which can be blinded by bright light and unable to make out details in the dark, NTU's new smart camera can record the slightest movements and objects in real time. The new camera records the changes in light intensity between scenes at nanosecond intervals, much faster than conventional video, and it stores the images in a data format that is many times smaller as well. With a unique in-built circuit, the camera can do an instant analysis of the captured scenes, highlighting important objects and details. Developed by Assistant Professor Chen Shoushun from NTU's School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, the new camera named Celex is now in its final prototype phase. "Our new camera can be a great safety tool for autonomous vehicles, since it can see very far ahead like optical cameras but without the time lag needed to analyse and process the video feed," explained Asst Prof Chen. "With its continuous tracking feature and instant analysis of a scene, it complements existing optical and laser cameras and can help self-driving vehicles and drones avoid unexpected collisions that usually happens within seconds." Asst Prof Chen unveiled the prototype of Celex last month at the 2017 IS&T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging (EI 2017) held in the United States. It received positive feedback from the conference attendees, many of whom are academia and top industry players. A typical camera sensor has several millions pixels, which are sensor sites that record light information and are used to form a resulting picture. High-speed video cameras that record up to 120 frames or photos per second generate gigabytes of video data, which are then processed by a computer in order for self-driving vehicles to "see" and analyse their environment. The more complex the environment, the slower the processing of the video data, leading to lag times between "seeing" the environment and the corresponding actions that the self-driving vehicle has to take. To enable an instant processing of visual data, NTU's patent-pending camera records the changes between light intensity of individual pixels at its sensor, which reduces the data output. This avoids the needs to capture the whole scene like a photograph, thus increasing the camera's processing speed. The camera sensor also has a built-in processor that can analyse the flow of data instantly to differentiate between the foreground objects and the background, also known as optical flow computation. This innovation allows self-driving vehicles more time to react to any oncoming vehicles or obstacles. The research into the sensor technology started in 2009 and it has received $500,000 in funding from the Ministry of Education Tier 1 research grant and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Proof-of-Concept grant. The technology was also published in two academic journals published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the world's largest technical professional organisation for the advancement of technology. With keen interest from the industry, Asst Prof Chen and his researchers have spun off a start-up company named Hillhouse Tech to commercialise the new camera technology. The start-up is incubated by NTUitive, NTU's innovation and enterprise company. Asst Prof Chen expects that the new camera will be commercially ready by the end of this year, as they are already in talks with global electronic manufacturers. Explore further: Lensless camera technology for adjusting video focus after image capture


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Government of Canada awards $18.2M for aluminum autoparts and better Li-ion battery management | Main | BIOX commissions 90M gallon biodiesel production facility in Houston » Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an ultrafast high-contrast camera that could help self-driving cars and drones see better in extreme road conditions and in bad weather. Unlike typical optical cameras, which can be blinded by bright light and unable to make out details in the dark, NTU’s new smart camera can record the slightest movements and objects in real time. The new camera records the changes in light intensity between scenes at nanosecond intervals, much faster than conventional video, and it stores the images in a data format that is many times smaller as well. With a unique in-built circuit, the camera can do an instant analysis of the captured scenes, highlighting important objects and details. Developed by Assistant Professor Chen Shoushun from NTU’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, the new camera named Celex is now in its final prototype phase. Chen unveiled the prototype of Celex last month at the 2017 IS&T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging (EI 2017) in the US. A typical digital camera sensor has several millions pixels—sensor sites that record light information and are used to form a resulting picture. High-speed video cameras that record up to 120 frames or photos per second generate gigabytes of video data, which are then processed by a computer in order for self-driving vehicles to “see” and analyze their environment. The more complex the environment, the slower the processing of the video data, leading to lag times between “seeing” the environment and the corresponding actions that the self-driving vehicle has to take. The CeleX sensor allows pixel-parallel image processing at the focal plane and event-driven readout. Each pixel in the sensor can individually monitor the slope of change in light intensity and report an event if a threshold is reached. Row and column arbitration circuits process the pixel events and make sure only one is granted to access the output port at a time in a fairly ordered manner when they receive multiple requests simultaneously. The response time to the pixel event is at nanosecond scale. As such, the sensor can be tuned to capture motion objects with speed faster than a certain threshold. The speed of the sensor is not limited by any traditional concept such as exposure time, frame rate, etc. It can detect fast motion which is traditionally captured by expensive, high speed cameras running at tens of thousands frames per second and at the same time produces 1000x less data. The CeleX Chipset is a hardware-implemented video analytics system, which perceives stream of pixels from the sensor and conveys value-added signal processing. The resulting system will be a software-hardware co-processing platform, enabling high speed implementation of video analytic tasks such as optical flow and convolution. The platform features standard interface to existing vision systems. It overcomes the over demanding computing power requirement of the existing vision based systems which are difficult to be realized in mobile computing platforms. The research into the sensor technology started in 2009 and it has received $500,000 in funding from the Ministry of Education Tier 1 research grant and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Proof-of-Concept grant. Chen and his researchers have spun off a start-up company named Hillhouse Tech to commercialize the new camera technology. The start-up is incubated by NTUitive, NTU’s innovation and enterprise company. Chen expects that the new camera will be commercially ready by the end of this year; Hillhouse is already in talks with global electronic manufacturers.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« NTU, JTC and SMRT to develop integrated transport solutions with joint research lab; “Mobility-as-a-Service Lab” | Main Ballard Power Systems has opened its first corporate office headquartered in Guangzhou, the capital of Guangdong Province, China. This office will serve as the company’s initial operations center in China, supporting management, sales and business development, technical, after-sales and administrative support personnel. Thecompany also recently completed the registration of a wholly foreign-owned enterprise (WFOE) with the name of 广州市巴拉德动力系统有限公司 (Guangzhou Ballard Power Systems Co., Ltd.). Our rapid and successful establishment of commercial relationships in China over the past year necessitates an in-country operations team. Last year we built out our sales and service teams and we expect to expand our China team to almost 20 people by year-end 2017 to support planned customer growth. This staff will fulfill a number of key roles, including business development, account management, applications engineering, after-sales support, quality assurance and supply chain management. Ballard also announced the promotion of Alfred Wong to Managing Director, Asia Pacific. Wong has relocated to China, working out of the Guangzhou office, to support Ballard activities.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

South-East Asia's first Illumina Hiseq X is now operational at MedGenome's lab in Singapore in partnership with Nanyang Technological University Singapore (NTU). To celebrate the launch and completion of first 250 whole genomes, MedGenome today announced a Grant Challenge offering human Whole Genome Sequencing at 30X coverage for USD 199 per genome. Based on evaluation of one-page project proposals submitted, 10 projects would be selected for this co-funding. Each proposal can be for up to 10 whole genomes. All submissions should be submitted by 31st of December 2016 to singapore_grant@medgenome.com. Funded proposals will be announced on Feb 3, 2017 during the Grand Challenge Ceremony at NTU. Large-scale genomic sequencing projects and innovative genomics research enable better understanding of complex human diseases and population structure. This has become a reality only with the high throughput and unprecedented low price per genome of HiSeq X Ten. "Local South-East Asian research communities need access to low cost high throughput NGS technologies to remain competitive with global initiatives in precision medicine," said MedGenome's COO, Dr. Ramprasad. The technology is bringing down the price of Whole Genome and Whole Genome Methylation sequencing to the much anticipated USD 1,000. "We are very excited to collaborate with a leading academic institution, NTU Singapore, to provide access to the latest sequencing technology to further population level and precision medicine initiatives. Illumina has been very supportive in the speedy setup of this technology platform and the Grant Challenge program," said Sam Santhosh, Chairman and Global CEO, MedGenome. "The lack of ultra-high throughput DNA sequencing locally, which reduces the cost per sample by as much as 80%, has restrained the pace of scientific discoveries in this region." said Stephan C. Schuster, Professor, NTU Singapore. "This joint initiative between NTU and our industry partner, MedGenome, will massively benefit our research projects not only at NTU, but across all leading research institutions and life sciences companies in the South-East Asian region." All MedGenome Singapore Grant Challenge samples will be sequenced within 30 days of receipt. MedGenome (http://www.medgenome.com) is a genomics-driven research and diagnostics company. MedGenome is a market leader for genomic diagnostics in South Asia and a leading provider of genomics research services globally. MedGenome offers genomics solutions in cancer immunotherapy and diabetes and works with various commercial and academic researchers globally on genomic research projects. It is also a founding member of GenomeAsia 100K initiative to sequence 100,000 genomes in South, North and East Asia. MedGenome is a global genomics firm with presence in San Francisco, USA, Bangalore, India and Singapore. Our NGS lab in Foster City, California is ISO 15189 compliant, CLIA certified and CAP accredited. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University (http://www.ntu.edu.sg), Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and it's Interdisciplinary Graduate School.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

To avoid accidents, self-driving cars and drones need to be able to quickly take in their surroundings even in extreme road conditions and bad weather, but conventional optical cameras aren't quite up to the job. To improve the vision of such vehicles, a team of engineers at the Nanyang Technological University Singapore (NTU Singapore), led by Assistant Professor Chen Shoushun, has developed an ultrafast, high-contrast smart camera that records the changes in light intensity between scenes at nanosecond intervals to detect movement and objects in real time. Autonomous vehicle technology has progressed remarkably in the past decade and has taken to the streets in numerous trials on the way to becoming a regular fixture on our roads. To operate safely they are dependent on sophisticated sensors – and especially cameras, which need to be fast and accurate. But conventional optical cameras can be blinded by bright light and have trouble resolving images quickly in bad weather or darkness. According to the NUT team, this is because current camera have sensors made of millions of pixels that use light to form an image. A high-speed video camera, such as a self-driving car would use, running at 120 frames a second, generates gigabytes of video data that needs to be analyzed for autonomous systems to "see" the surrounding environment. In very bright light, bad weather, darkness, or where it's just visually complex, it can take some time to process the images, which results in a significant time lag that a fast-moving vehicle or drone can't afford. Chen and his team started developing the new camera, called Celex, in 2009 and it's now in its final prototype stage. The team claims that it can record the slightest movements and objects in real time, is faster than conventional cameras by operating at nanosecond intervals, and can store images in a new data format allowing for smaller files. The team says that Celex contains a built-in processor circuit that analyzes changes in light intensity of individual pixels at the sensor. As this avoids analyzing whole images, it reduces the amount data that needs to be handled and speeds up the process. The method also allows the camera to quickly differentiate between foreground and background objects and gives the vehicle's computer more time to react to situations. NTU says that the new technology has attracted the interest of private industry and that Chen and his team have spun off a company called Hillhouse Tech to handle commercialization of the camera. According to Chen, the camera may be commercially available by the end of 2017. "Our new camera can be a great safety tool for autonomous vehicles, since it can see very far ahead like optical cameras but without the time lag needed to analyze and process the video feed," says Chen. "With its continuous tracking feature and instant analysis of a scene, it complements existing optical and laser cameras and can help self-driving vehicles and drones avoid unexpected collisions that usually happen within seconds." A prototype of the camera was shown at the 2017 IS&T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging (EI 2017) and the research was published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).


SINGAPORE, Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Verizon Enterprise Solutions and Nanyang Technology University's (NTU) Business School are joining forces to analyze and better understand economic and insurance loss experienced by global insurers from cybersecurity incidents. Leveraging...


« GM, PSA discussing potential acquisition of Opel Vauxhall by PSA | Main | Ballard builds out China operations center for expanding fuel cell business » Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), JTC and SMRT Services Pte Ltd (SMRT) have joined forces to develop innovative solutions that seamlessly integrate multiple modes of transportation, for better connectivity and accessibility. This is in line with the Government’s aim of making Singapore a living lab to develop and test new urban solutions. A Memorandum of Understanding between the three parties paves the way for the formation of a new “Mobility-as-a-Service Lab”. It leverages the strengths of each partner to fulfil Singapore’s vision of a car-lite society, comprising NTU Singapore’s capabilities in research and development, evaluating engineering trials and data analytics, JTC’s expertise in master planning of industrial parks and the development of innovative infrastructure, and SMRT’s experience as a multi-modal transport operator. The ‘Mobility-as-a-Service Lab’ will be the first-of-its-kind in the region aimed at improving commuters’ travel experience by seamlessly integrating train and bus networks with next-generation transport modes. These include electric automated vehicles, bike sharing systems and personal mobility devices such as e-scooters. Commuters will be able to use multiple transport modes and travel to further locations conveniently, without relying on personal cars. SMRT has been developing its Mobility-as-a-Service capabilities to provide a customized solution and user-friendly digital platform through which commuters can decide on their preferred travel mode based on time, cost and convenience. NTU Singapore’s lush campus and CleanTech Park in Jurong Innovation District will be transformed into a live test-bed for the integration of multiple transportation options and new technologies. Among the first few projects to be undertaken by the joint research lab will be the development of a comprehensive transport master plan for the NTU Singapore campus and CleanTech Park. Conducted by urban mobility managers, engineering researchers and land use planners from the three partners, the transport master plan will leverage on technologies and data analytics to assess the feasibility of integrating automated vehicles, new bike/scooter sharing systems and promotion of the use of bicycles and e-scooter within these locations.

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