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News Article | August 17, 2017
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Fast Company was on the ground at Lollapalooza in Chicago’s Grant Park earlier this month. The stacked lineup included Chance the Rapper, Lorde, Tegan and Sara, Run the Jewels, Zara Larsson, and way more. In this special Lolla-themed #TBT, we revisit two artist Q&As in tandem with Red Bull TV. Jake Luppen (vocalist): We get out the N64 and smash it. You need to take a break sometimes. Nathan Stocker (guitarist): It really dilutes any sort of negative vibes. You play and then it’s over with; it’s done. FC: What would you say the Hippo Campus brand is? JL: Minnesota is pretty central to our brand, where we’re from. We get associated with that quite a bit. NS: We also don’t want to clearly define it because it’s always changing. It’s like water: There’s no shape. FC: How do you solve differences within the group without damaging your dynamic? NS: There’s a skill set we’ve had to adapt to where we have to respect each other’s privacy and opinions. We’ve learned to respectfully disagree and be honest about it without any sort of tension. It doesn’t matter what you think; it’s how you think it. .@wearefrenship tells us what's made #Lolla so special to them—and much more! Tune in to our Instagram Story: https://t.co/EXX5ACBPfO pic.twitter.com/qrnPC8tZZ9 Fast Company: What’s your creative process like? Where do you find inspiration? James Sunderland: Feelings, probably more than anything. I think a lot of our songs start as—and this is a clichéd verb—a vibe. It sounds stupid, but “Capsize” started out like that. Brett Hite: I think the more interesting part of our creative process is a little bit more down the road. That’s when it becomes unique. When you’re revisiting and editing your original idea, you have to acknowledge that something doesn’t feel right. It’s that balance between being creative and critical. FC: What is the Frenship brand? JS: It’s lighthearted and fun, but also thoughtful. We give off campfire vibes. FC: How do you solve differences within the group without damaging your dynamic? BH: Fistfights and kisses on the cheek.


Chen K.,Nanyang Technological University | Johan H.,NS Solar Material Co.
Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds | Year: 2017

In this paper, we propose an approach to interactively author the bending and twisting motions of short plants using hand gestures, especially suitable for grass, flowers, and leaves. Our method is based on the observations that hand motions can represent the bending and twisting motions of short plants and using a hand to describe motions is natural and proficient for human. We therefore use a hand as a "puppet" to author the animation of one single short plant based on transferring the motions of a hand to the motions of a short plant. We first author the global motions of the short plant followed by the motions of its elements such as leaves and flowers. We also propose a framework to utilize the animation results to animate a field of short plants and further adjust the motion effects according to the properties of the short plants, such as rigidity. As a result, users can intuitively and rapidly author and generate their desired motions of short plants under the influence of external forces. Especially, our method is accessible to non-expert users and suitable for fast prototyping and authoring specific motions of short plants such as in cartoons. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Strachan S.A.,Environment Canada | Reynoldson T.B.,University of Canberra | Reynoldson T.B.,NS Solar Material Co.
Freshwater Science | Year: 2014

The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of 3 bioassessment models for reference data sets collected from the Australia Capital Territory (ACT), the Yukon River Basin (YT), and the Laurentian Great Lakes (GL) built following the standard Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) method. To evaluate the models, we used validation reference-site data, which were artificially impaired to simulate 3 levels of eutrophication by varying the proportions of sensitive, intermediate, and tolerant taxa. Models correctly classified 56 to 62% of reference sites. Type 1 errors (assessing reference sites as degraded) were high for all data sets and ranged from 30 to 75%, in part because the biological communities of the validation sites extended to or beyond the range of the reference-site data used to build the models. Capturing the full range of ecological variation with adequate sample size is critical for reference-condition approach (RCA)-type models. Type 2 errors (assessing degraded sites as in reference condition) varied greatly among data sets and for each reference group within each data set. Resource managers must carefully consider the risks associated with making errors. Thus, standard methods for quality assurance of assessment models should include simulated data so that error rates and adjusted assessment thresholds can be reported to ensure that degradation can be detected and that undisturbed sites are not mistakenly subjected to unnecessary management action. © 2014 by The Society for Freshwater Science.


Heard G.J.,NS Solar Material Co.
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics | Year: 2013

During August 2012, acoustic recording systems were deployed in Barrow Strait as part of the Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) Northern Watch Technology Demonstration Project. Two Starfish Sensor Cubes each with a 1-m cube of seven hydrophones operating in the frequency range of 5 - 750 Hz, and two single-hydrophone, Autonomous Multichannel Acoustic Recorders (AMAR) providing a 30-kHz signal bandwidth were deployed. The Starfish were deployed for two one-week intervals. One AMAR was deployed for two weeks partially overlapping the Starfish deployment. The second AMAR was deployed for a period of one year with recovery planned for August 2013. The observed underwater noise picture is one of high variability ranging from an extremely quiet to a noisy environment. Noise sources included: A 500-m long iceberg grounded within 500 m of one of the Starfish; a large ice island (4-5 km2) that passed within 4 km of the sensors; a small number of motoring vessels; significant wind events that caused rapid and strong variations in the noise field; and a small number of marine mammal detections. After our departure, a large number of Beluga whales were observed visually. The remaining AMAR may detect these late summer visitors. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.


Pecknold S.P.,NS Solar Material Co.
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics | Year: 2013

During the summer of 2012, a field trial was held in Barrow Strait, south of Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic. The trial included a set of acoustic transmission loss experiments recorded on Starfish Sensor Cubes, which include a 1-m cube of seven hydrophones operating in the frequency range of 5 - 750 Hz. The transmission loss runs consisted of 10-minute and 20-minute duration transmissions of 400 Hz and 500 Hz tones made at a discrete set of distances up to 60 km from the recorders. Supporting environmental measurements included sets of CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) profiles and bathymetric measurements. The effects of the measured environmental properties and variability are investigated via propagation modeling, and compared to the experimental data acquired during these experiments. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.


Martin B.,NS Solar Material Co.
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics | Year: 2013

The goal of many underwater acoustic environmental assessments is to characterize the soundscape in an area before, during or after an anthropogenic activity. The assessment determines the range of baseline noise levels from natural and anthropogenic sources and the contribution of the new anthropogenic activity. The noise levels are considered in aggregate for possible effects on the environment. It is accepted that the effects of anthropogenic noise on marine life depend on the intensity and duration of exposure, the frequency content of the sound relative to the hearing abilities of the species, and the behaviour context of the species exposed to the sounds. A growing body of scientific evidence is being analyzed to establish threshold sound levels and dose-response curves for injury or behavioural disturbance effects to marine life. Recent research is also raising new questions about the most appropriate ways to compute ambient sound levels and exposure metrics. In this paper we present our methods for quantifying ambient sound levels and anthropogenic sound levels from shipping and seismic survey activities in large data sets. We also make recommendations on how to estimate background sound levels in the presence of these sound sources. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.


Matthews M.-N.R.,NS Solar Material Co.
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics | Year: 2013

In this paper, we compare airgun sound levels measured during an offshore seismic survey to acoustic model predictions. The survey occurred in deep water (>650 m), on and beyond the continental slope in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. The modeling was performed with JASCO Applied Sciences' Marine Operations Noise Model, which uses a parabolic-equation-based algorithm to predict N×2 D sound propagation in ocean environments. Sound levels were measured with up to five calibrated Autonomous Multichannel Acoustic Recorders at distances of 50 to 50,000 m from the airgun array in water depths between 50 and 1,500 m. The sound levels were measured in both the broadside (across-track) and endfire (along-track) directions. The high-resolution digital recordings of seismic sounds were analyzed to determine peak and root-mean-square sound pressure levels and sound exposure levels as functions of range from the airgun array, and compared to the model results. Although the modeled sound levels were generally conservative, the model results accurately predicted the existence of a shadow zone and the overall transmission loss trend. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.


Ellis D.D.,NS Solar Material Co.
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics | Year: 2013

Reverberation measurements were made in the Gulf of Mexico off Panama City, Florida, USA in April 2012 in preparation for the main Target and Reverberation Experiment (TREX) in May 2013. The data were gathered using the triplet section of the ONR Five Octave Research Array (FORA), deployed as a fixed receiver. By steering cardioid beams to the right or left the array can reduce ambiguity. Beamformed data from the 2012 trial show background noise with high directionality and variability due to nearby shipping. Model predictions of reverberation and target are compared with data using a range-dependent Clutter Model, which uses adiabatic normal modes as the computational engine. The initial predictions use isovelocity water, over a sandy bottom halfspace with Lambert scattering, and bathymetry from the GEBCO 08 database. These initial results will be presented, hopefully supplemented by improved predictions with better environmental inputs and additional clutter data obtained during the May 2013 experiment. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.


Martin B.,NS Solar Material Co.
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics | Year: 2013

The Gully Marine Protected Area (MPA) is a large submarine canyon at the edge of the Scotian Shelf, south of Nova Scotia. A resident population of northern bottlenose whales are known to occur in the Gully throughout the year, and the canyon provides important foraging grounds for the population. Bottom-mounted Autonomous Multichannel Acoustic Recorders (AMAR) were deployed in the Gully for ten days in in March 2010 (sampling rate = 375 ksps) and two days in October 2011 (sampling rate = 128 ksps). Bisonar pulses produced northern bottlenose whales (likely used to echolocate prey) were recorded consistently throughout these AMAR deployments. The swept FM characteristics of the northern bottlenose whale pulses recorded were consistent over both years, and both data sets contained clear pulse reflections from bottom clutter or prey targets. In this paper we provide a description of the northern bottlenose whale pulses recorded in the Gully and make recommendations on short-time Fourier transform parameters for analysis of the pulses. A description of the pulse reflections is also provided, based on analysis of the reflection patterns using short-time Fourier transforms and by matched filtering with the direct arrival from the whales. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.


Majaess D.,Saint Mary's University, Halifax | Majaess D.,NS Solar Material Co. | Turner D.,Saint Mary's University, Halifax | Turner D.,NS Solar Material Co. | Gieren W.,University of Concepción
Astrophysical Journal Letters | Year: 2011

Evidence is presented which supports findings that the classical Cepheid VIC period Wesenheit function is relatively insensitive to metallicity. The viability of a recently advocated strong metallicity dependence was evaluated by applying the proposed correction (γ = -0.8magdex -1) to distances established for the Magellanic Clouds via a Galactic VIC Wesenheit calibration, which is anchored to 10 nearby classical Cepheids with measured Hubble Space Telescope (HST) parallaxes. The resulting γ-corrected distances for the Magellanic Clouds (e.g., Small Magellanic Cloud, μ0, γ ∼ 18.3) are in significant disagreement with that established from a mean of >300 published estimates (NED-D), and a universal Wesenheit template featuring 11 δ Scuti, SX Phe, RRLyrae, and Type II Cepheid variables with HST/Hipparcos parallaxes. Conversely, adopting a null correction (i.e., γ = 0magdex-1) consolidates the estimates. In tandem with existing evidence, the results imply that variations in chemical composition among Cepheids are a comparatively negligible source of uncertainty for -based extragalactic distances and determinations of H 0. A new approach is described which aims to provide additional Galactic Cepheid calibrators to facilitate subsequent assessments of the VI C Wesenheit function's relative (in) sensitivity to abundance changes. VVV/UKIDSS/Two Micron All Sky Survey JHKs photometry for clusters in spiral arms shall be employed to establish a precise galactic longitude-distance relation, which can be applied in certain cases to determine the absolute Wesenheit magnitudes for younger Cepheids. © 2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

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