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News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

AMHERST, NY, February 24, 2017-- Dr. Prem Datta Bharadwaj has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Recognized for five and a half decades of invaluable contributions to his field, Dr. Bharadwaj has parlayed his knowledge into the field of physics education. Prior to embarking on his career, he earned a Bachelor of Science from NREC College Khurja (Agra University) with merit in 1950 and then a Master of Science in Physics with 1st Division and 1st Position from Agra College, Agra (Agra University) in 1952. He then joined B.R. College Agra as an assistant professor of physics, where he remained for two years before working for another two as a physics lecturer at GPIC Tehri Garhwal. Dr. Bharadwaj transferred to Government College Meerut, where he acted as a lecturer in physics for three years. He then returned to B.R. College Agra as an assistant professor of physics for one year.Dr. Bharadwaj came to the United States in 1960 as a graduate assistant in the Physics Department of SUNY Buffalo. After finishing most of the requirements for a Ph.D. in 1962, he was appointed as Assistant Professor of Physics at Niagara University and had to wait for two years for his Ph.D. according to the rules of the Physics Department at SUNY Buffalo. After working for two years, and doing research, his Ph.D. was confirmed in 1964. In 1964 he was promoted to the position of Associate Professor of Physics. In 1966 he was promoted to the position of Professor of Physics, and continued working in that role until 2007. He served as Chairman of the Physics Department for 10 years, from 1976 to 1986.A member of the American Physical Society, Dr. Bharadwaj co-founded the Hindi Samaj of Greater Buffalo in 1986 and the India Association of Buffalo in 1961, and was honored by it in 1997. He has contributed to numerous written works throughout the course of his career, including "Intermediate Agriculture Physics and Climatology," which he co-authored in 1954. He was a consultant to the National Science Foundation from 1966-1971, evaluating undergraduate programs and research grants for all universities and colleges in the U.S. A sterling example of skill in his field, he has won many awards for his stellar work, such as the Rajiv Gandhi National Unity Award for Excellence from the government of India in 1995 and the Hind Rattan (Jewel of India) Award the same year. Also, he was named International Man of the Year by the American Biographical Institute in 1999, and was featured in the 6th through 8th editions of Who's Who in American Education, the 4th through 11th editions of Who's Who in Science and Engineering, the 53rd through 70th editions of Who's Who in America, the 39th through 43rd editions of Who's Who in the East, and the 16th through 33rd editions of Who's Who in the World. Dr. Bharadwaj was also included in other publications including "2,000 Outstanding Scientists of the 20th and 21st Century" and "500 Leaders of Influence" by IBC, Cambridge, England, "2,000 Outstanding People of the 20th and 21st Century, " and "2,000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 20th and 21st Century" by IBC, Cambridge, England. Dr. Bharadwaj was also listed in "1,000 Leaders of World Influence" by the American Biographic Institute" in 2000, and was chosen for appointment to the Research Board of Advisors in 2000.Looking toward the future, Dr. Bharadwaj intends to continue enjoying retirement and devoting himself to spiritual endeavors.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Mohapatra S.C.,University of Delhi | Tiwari H.K.,Nrec College | Singla M.,University of Delhi | Rathi B.,University of Delhi | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry | Year: 2010

A new class of copper(II) nanohybrid solids, LCu(CH3COO) 2 and LCuCl2, have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and IR spectroscopy, and have been found to be capped by a bis(benzimidazole) diamide ligand (L). The particle sizes of these nanohybrid solids were found to be in the ranges 5-10 and 60-70 nm, respectively. These nanohybrid solids were evaluated for their in vitro antimalarial activity against a chloroquine-sensitive isolate of Plasmodium falciparum (MRC 2). The interactions between these nanohybrid solids and plasmepsin II (an aspartic protease and a plausible novel target for antimalarial drug development), which is believed to be essential for hemoglobin degradation by the parasite, have been assayed by UV-vis spectroscopy and inhibition kinetics using Lineweaver-Burk plots. Our results suggest that these two compounds have antimalarial activities, and the IC50 values (0.025-0.032 μg/ml) are similar to the IC50 value of the standard drug chloroquine used in the bioassay. Lineweaver-Burk plots for inhibition of plasmepsin II by LCu(CH3COO)2 and LCuCl2 show that the inhibition is competitive with respect to the substrate. The inhibition constants of LCu(CH3COO)2 and LCuCl2 were found to be 10 and 13 μM, respectively. The IC50 values for inhibition of plasmepsin II by LCu(CH3COO)2 and LCuCl 2 were found to be 14 and 17 μM, respectively. Copper(II) metal capped by a benzimidazole group, which resembles the histidine group of copper proteins (galactose oxidase, β-hydroxylase), could provide a suitable anchoring site on the nanosurface and thus could be useful for inhibition of target enzymes via binding to the S1/S3 pocket of the enzyme hydrophobically. Both copper(II) nanohybrid solids were found to be nontoxic against human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and were highly selective for plasmepsin II versus human cathepsin D. The pivotal mechanism of antimalarial activity of these compounds via plasmepsin II inhibition in the P. falciparum malaria parasite is demonstrated. © 2009 SBIC.


Saxena A.,Swami Keshvanand Institute of Technology | Upadhyay R.,Nrec College
Oriental Journal of Chemistry | Year: 2012

Mixed ligand complexes of zinc (II) involving either mercaptyl thiazolidinone (1) [2-(2-hydroxy benzoyl)-3-N-(2-mercaptyl)-1-Thiazolidin-4-one] or pyridine thiazolidinone (2) [ 2-(2-hydroxy benzoyl-3-N-(2-Pyridinyl)-1- Thiazolidin-4-one] alone and along with thiourea have been obtained by partial or complete replacement of the strongly coordinated ammonia of ammine complex. All the products have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility and IR and electronic spectral measurements for their bonding and structures.


Saxena A.,Swami Keshvanand Institute of Technology | Upadhyay R.,Nrec College
Oriental Journal of Chemistry | Year: 2014

Mixed ligand complexes of copper (II), involving either Mercaptyl thiazolidinone (1) [2-(2-hydroxy benzoyl)-3-N-(2-mercaptyl)-1-Thiazolidin-4-one] or Pyridine thiazolidinone (2) [2-(2-hydroxy benzoyl-3-N-(2-Pyridinyl)-1-Thiazolidin-4-one] alone and along with Thiourea were synthesized by partial or complete replacement of the strongly coordinated ammonia of ammine complex. All the products have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR and electronic spectral measurements for their bonding and structures. © Oriental Scientific Publishing Company. All rights reserved.


Kumar M.,Sv College | Agrawal A.,Nrec College | Kumar R.,Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University
Physics Procedia | Year: 2015

The present study was conducted to measure integrated radon and thoron concentration levels in dwellings of Aligarh city and around the thermal power station situated in Aligarh District. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (LR-115, TYPE-II) based twin cup dosimeters were used for this purpose. Radon and thoron progeny concentration levels in terms of Potential Alpha Energy Concentrations (PAECs) and annual effective dose received by the inhabitants in studied dwellings were estimated from observed values of radon and thoron gas concentrations. The evaluated mean values of radon and thoron gas concentration in Aligarh city were 30.3 Bqm-3 (SD =10.6) and 10.2 Bqm-3 (SD =6.1) respectively and around thermal power station 23.6Bqm-3(SD = 5.2) and 7.7 Bqm-3 (SD= 1.9) respectively. The evaluated mean value of radon and thoron progeny concentration were 3.3 mWL (SD=1.1) and 1.1 mWL (SD= 0.7) respectively, in Aligarh city and 2.6 mWL (SD=0.6) and 0.8 mWL (SD= 0.2) around thermal power station. The estimated average value of annual effective dose in studied dwellings was 0.9 mSv (SD= 0.3) in Aligarh city and 0.7 mSv (SD= 0.2) around thermal power station. © 2015 The Authors.


Kumar M.,Sv College | Agrawal A.,Nrec College | Kumar R.,Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry | Year: 2014

Twin cup pin-hole dosimeters having LR-115 as the detector were used to measure the concentration of radon and thoron in the dwellings of Firozabad city of Uttar Pradesh State in India. The mean values of radon, thoron, radon progeny and thoron progeny concentrations were found to be 37.4 Bqm−3, 13.7 Bqm−3, 4.0 and 1.5 mWL respectively. The average value of annual effective dose equivalent to the inhabitants of Firozabad city was found to be 1.1 mSv and is below the action level as recommended by the ICRP. © 2014, Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary.


Kumar M.,P.A. College | Agrawal A.,Nrec College | Kumar R.,Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry | Year: 2014

Inhalation of radon, thoron and their decay products can cause a significant health hazard when present in enhanced levels in the indoor environment like a human dwelling. In the present work a set of indoor radon and thoron measurements was carried out using time-integrated passive twin cup dosimeters containing LR-115 Type II solid state nuclear track detectors in different houses of Khurja City in Bulandshahar district of U.P. in India, built of the same type of building materials. The radon gas concentration was found to vary from 9.18 to 23.19 Bq m-3 with an average value of 16.02 Bq m-3 (SD = 3.68) and the thoron gas concentration varied from 2.78 to 9.03 Bq m-3 with an average value of 5.36 Bq m-3 (SD = 1.58). The radon progeny concentration ranged from 0.99 to 2.51 mWL with an average value of 1.77 mWL (SD = 0.40) and the concentration of thoron progeny was found to vary from 0.30 to 0.98 mWL with an average value of 0.58 mWL (SD = 0.17). The annual effective dose varied from 0.27 to 0.67 mSv year-1 with an average value of 0.47 mSv year-1(SD = 0.10). © 2014 Akadémiai Kiadó.


Bharati K.A.,CSIR - Central Electrochemical Research Institute | Sharma B.L.,Nrec College
Ethnobotany Research and Applications | Year: 2012

Field work was conducted to document the ethnoveterinary medicine used by members of the indigenous community in Sikkim Himalayas, India, in order to treat ailments of their livestock. This research detailed the use of 37 medicinal plants to treat ailments in animals such as diarrhea, dysentery, digestive disorders, injury, wound, fever, maternity complications, skin disease, urinary problems, cough and cold, skeleto-muscular disorders, inflammation, scorpion sting, snake and insect bite, weakness, parasite, ulcer and bleeding. 12 medicinal plants being used in Sikkim Himalayas have not been documented in ethnoveterinary medicine elsewhere in the world. 15 plant species were found to contain previously unreported medicinal properties.


Kumar R.,Bareilly College | Bharati K.A.,NREC College
Indian Journal of Natural Products and Resources | Year: 2012

This study aims to document folk medicinal knowledge of plants used for the treatment of livestock in the Sitapur district of Uttar Pradesh. Information on these veterinary practices was gathered from June 2009 to April 2010 by interviewing residents using the "Transect walks" method of the Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) technique. The method was based on semi-structured interviews and discussions with key research participants. A total of fifty-seven medicinal formulas were recorded for use in the treatment of different livestock diseases. These formulations are not reported in earlier published literature.


Bharati K.A.,NREC College | Sharma B.L.,NREC College
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2010

A field survey was done to study and document the indigenous knowledge of various ethnic groups of Sikkim regarding animal healthcare. The hills of Sikkim Himalaya are inhabited by number of ethnic groups. They use medicinal plants not only for human being but also for their domestic animals. Large number of plants has been collected and the information on their ethnoveterinary uses was gathered from local inhabitants. The information about folk medicinal use, vernacular names of plants and the parts of the plants used are documented. During the investigation, a well developed ethnoveterinary system among tribal people was observed. Twenty of plant species used by local people to cure various disease and disorders were recorded.

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