Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States

Nova Southeastern University

nova.edu/
Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States

Nova Southeastern University, formerly referred to as Nova and now commonly called NSU, is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian, research university located in Broward County, Florida, United States, with its main campus in the town of Fort Lauderdale. The university is the eighth-largest not-for-profit private university in the nation. NSU operates eight Student Educational Centers in Florida, the largest being a 300 acres campus located approximately 24 miles north of Downtown Miami.The university was founded as the Nova University of Advanced Technology on a former Naval Outlying Landing Field built during World War II. The university first offered graduate degrees in the physical and social science. Leo Goodwin, Sr. left a $16 million bequest to the university in 1971 which funded its expansion throughout the 1970s and 1980s. In 1994, the university merged with the Southeastern University of the Health science and assumed its current name.NSU currently consists of 18 colleges and schools offering over 175 programs of study with more than 250 majors. The university offers professional degrees in law, business, osteopathic medicine, allied health, pharmacy, dentistry, optometry, and nursing. Nova Southeastern enrolled 28,457 students in the 2011-2012 academic year and has produced over 145,000 alumni.NSU is classified as a high research and community engaged university by the Carnegie Foundation. The university is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and also has numerous additional specialized accreditations for its colleges and programs.The NSU Sharks compete in the NCAA Division II Sunshine State Conference in seventeen intercollegiate athletic programs. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Nova Southeastern University | Date: 2017-07-26

Digital files are compressed using a process including Schmidt decompositions of matrices using an algorithm, termed BSD herein, which is based on an algebraic method generalizing QR decomposition. Software analyzes an input file and initially identifies a matrix M, with entries within a predefined set of integers, within the file. Next, essential entries are defined, extracted from M, that contain sufficient information to recover Musing BSD. The compressed file includes the essential entries and their positions within M. To achieve an encryption process, software encrypts the pattern matrix that includes the positions of the essential entries of M. To achieve a lossy compression, software identifies essential entries that contain sufficient information to recover an approximation to M for which the quality is determined by an error threshold. For a more efficient lossy compression, software uses singular value decomposition, BSD, and other signal processing of M.


The invention provides atropine sulfate (AS) rapidly-disintegrating sublingual tablets (RDSTs) in a sublingual dosage form and methods for therapeutic use of the AS RDSTs for treatment of organophosphate (OP) exposure and acute toxicity. The AS RDSTs provide an alternative easy-to-use dosage form for the management of organophosphate toxicity. Additionally, the invention provides methods for formulation and quality evaluation of the atropine sulfate rapidly-disintegrating sublingual tablets.


The invention provides a composition including epinephrine nanoparticles and methods for therapeutic use of the composition in the treatment of conditions responsive to epinephrine such as a cardiac event or an allergic reaction, particularly anaphylaxis. The epinephrine nanoparticles can be incorporated into orally-disintegrating and fast-disintegrating tablet pharmaceutical formulations and can significantly increase the sublingual bioavailability of epinephrine, and thereby reduce the epinephrine dose required. Additionally, the invention provides methods for fabrication of stabilized epinephrine nanoparticles for use in the described compositions.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Research Coordination Networks | Award Amount: 453.15K | Year: 2016

1338851 (Tao). The objective of this RCN is to develop a collaborative research platform centered on overcoming bottlenecks in engineering, software and social/economic sciences that impede wider application of sustainable building technology. The network activities will focus on defining an innovative, new interdisciplinary area, Sustainable Human-Building Ecosystem (SHBE), that integrates human behavioral science, social and economic sciences in tandem with sciences of building design, engineering, and metrology for data validation of building energy consumption and occupant comforts. The developed collaboration strategies and standardized data platform will lead to significant reductions of the uncertainty in predicting human adaptation to energy efficiency and sustainability of building ecosystems, which will also address fundamental questions such as what are the benefits of sustainable building investment to people at a personal, business, or urban planning level? The activities of the new SHBE-RCN include: collectively develop a consensus-based mechanism for an IT-enabled, data-networked research platform that allows sharing the connectivity methods from different models of building ecosystem elements; create the networking mechanism to recruit additional participants or update the working groups; develop the new research directions for identified subareas; evaluate the success of the SHBE network; and develop an innovative learning program for graduate students of diverse backgrounds. The steering committee members are from engineering, architecture, computer science, construction, environmental science, business and social science with national and international collaboration experience and access to data from various sustainable building projects: Yong Tao, Derrick D?Souza, and Ruthanne Thompson of the University of North Texas, William Tolone and Mirsad Hadzikadic of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, David Cartes and Richard Feiock of Florida State University, Yimin Zhu and Thomas Spiegelhalter, of Florida International University, Wei Yan of Texas A&M University, Kee Poh Lam of Carnegie Mellon University, and Carol Menassa of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The SHBE RCN aims to foster a new understanding of the complex interactions among the key elements of human-building ecosystems and to work towards a set of new theories for integration of predictive models to explore the following hypothesis: Integrating occupant behaviors with built environment performances validated from large field data sets can lead to significant reductions of the uncertainty in predictive models for human adaptation to energy efficiency and sustainability of building ecosystems. It will bring together researchers from different fields, who otherwise would not be able to network together, to form working groups focusing on understanding the interoperability (or inputs and outputs) of predictive models from different disciplines within the five thematic frameworks: I-Building physical system and environment modeling; II-Human behavior modeling; III-Social/policy impact modeling; IV-Dynamic life cycle assessment (LCA) and business ecosystem modeling; and V-Model integration and validation. All five themes are linked in such a way that no single theme will produce meaningful outcomes without the significant input from other themes. This network?s research agenda will allow researchers to work towards solutions impacting people, their communities, and future of their lives. Providing a viable platform for meaningful research collaboration in quantifying the sustainable building ecosystem will enable the development of new theories and methods that could help city planners and political and financial decision makers to develop the most balanced sustainable solutions for both human and natural environment. The network management team will also implement a mechanism to promote diversity by recruiting graduate assistants and network participants through workshops and lab visits. This will be achieved by working with the Center for Diversity in Engineering and Computing at Florida International University, a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI), and similar initiatives in the participating institutions. The network participants will also contribute to the development of a unique interdisciplinary learning program, based on the concept of an outcome-driven, diverse, and individualized learning mechanism.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY | Award Amount: 391.92K | Year: 2015

Reef-building acroporid corals form the foundation of shallow tropical coral communities throughout the Caribbean. Yet, the once dominant staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis) and the elkhorn coral (A. palmata) have decreased by more than 90% since the 1980s, primarily from disease. Their continuing decline jeopardizes the ability of coral reefs to provide numerous societal and ecological benefits, including economic revenue from seafood harvesting and tourism and shoreline protection from extreme wave events caused by storms and hurricanes. Despite their protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act since 2006, threats to the survival of reef-building acroporid corals remain pervasive and include disease and warming ocean temperatures that may lead to further large-scale mortality. However, hybridization among these closely related species is increasing and may provide an avenue for adaptation to a changing environment. While hybrids were rare in the past, they are now thriving in shallow habitats with extreme temperatures and irradiance and are expanding into the parental species habitats. Additional evidence suggests that the hybrid is more disease resistant than at least one of the parental species. Hybridization may therefore have the potential to rescue the threatened parental species from extinction through the transfer of adapted genes via hybrids mating with both parental species, but extensive gene flow may alter the evolutionary trajectory of the parental species and drive one or both to extinction. This collaborative project is to collect genetic and ecological data in order to understand the mechanisms underlying increasing hybrid abundance. The knowledge gained from this research will help facilitate more strategic management of coral populations under current and emerging threats to their survival. This project includes integrated research and educational opportunities for high school, undergraduate and graduate students, and a postdoctoral researcher. Students in the United States Virgin Islands will take part in coral spawning research and resource managers will receive training on acroporid reproduction to apply to coral restoration techniques.

Current models predict the demise of reefs in the next 200 years due to increasing sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification. It is thus essential to identify habitats, taxa and evolutionary mechanisms that will allow some coral species to maintain their role as foundation fauna. Hybridization can provide an avenue for adaptation to changing conditions. Corals hybridize with some frequency and results may range from the introduction of a few alleles into existing parent species via introgression, to the birth of a new, perhaps better adapted genetic lineage. The only widely accepted coral hybrid system consists of the once dominant but now threatened Caribbean species, Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata. In the past, hybrid colonies originating from natural crosses between elkhorn and staghorn corals were rare, and evidence of hybrid reproduction was limited to infrequent matings with the staghorn coral. Recent field observations suggest that the hybrid is increasing and its ecological role is changing throughout the Caribbean. These hybrids appear to be less affected by the disease that led to the mass mortality of their parental species in recent decades. Hybrids are also found thriving in shallow habitats with high temperatures and irradiance suggesting they may be less susceptible to future warming scenarios. At the same time, they are expanding into the deeper parental species habitats. Preliminary genetic data indicate that hybrids are now mating with each other, demonstrating the potential for the formation of a new species. Further, hybrids appear to be capable of mating with both staghorn and elkhorn coral, perhaps leading to gene flow between the parent species via the hybrid. Research is proposed to address how the increase in hybridization and perhaps subsequent introgression will affect the current ecological role and the future evolutionary trajectory of Caribbean acroporids. Specifically, this collaborative project aims to answer the following questions: 1) What is the historic rate, direction, and degree of introgression across species ranges and genomes? Linkage block analysis based on genome-wide SNP genotyping across three replicate hybrid zones will answer this question. 2) What is the current extent and future potential of later generation hybrid formation? Morphometric and genetic analyses combined with in vitro fertilization assays will be used. 3) What mechanisms allow hybrids to thrive in hot, shallow waters? A series of manipulative in situ and ex situ experiments will determine whether biotic or abiotic factors favor hybrid survival in shallow waters. 4) Are hybrids more disease resistant than the parentals species? Disease transmission assays in reciprocal transplant experiments and histological analysis to determine the extent of disease will be conducted. A multidisciplinary approach will be taken that combines traditional and cutting edge technology to provide a detailed analysis of the evolutionary ecology of Caribbean corals.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PERCEPTION, ACTION & COGNITION | Award Amount: 167.30K | Year: 2016

Most people easily modify their attention and behavior to meet the changing demands of their surroundings. For example, people easily shift from reading a book to answering a telephone call without confusing the content of the book with the content of the conversation. Similarly, people who are fluent in more than one language can effortlessly shift from one language to another. Moreover, when communicating with people who speak only one language, bilingual and multilingual speakers rarely experience intrusions from the other languages they speak, presumably because they are able to inhibit the language that is inappropriate for the situation. The inhibitory processes that allow bilingual or multilingual speakers to suppress a language may be the same processes that allow people to shift attention appropriately. If that is the case, inhibitory processes may be better developed in speakers of two or more languages and the possibility exists that general inhibitory processes might be strengthened in monolingual speakers as they learn and develop proficiency in a second language.


Modifying behavior to meet the changing demands of the environment requires inhibiting habitual behaviors, shifting attention, and updating working memory. This crucially requires a process of inhibition, in order to keep salient but distracting information from gaining control of attention. An intriguing theory is that the inhibitory processes that allow humans to adapt to a changing environment are the same ones that allow bilinguals to suppress one language while speaking and to shift from one language to the other. The speculation is that inhibition is better developed in bilingual and multilingual speakers relative to speakers of only one language because bilinguals engage inhibitory control processes to control language output as well as to control attention. If correct, inhibitory processes may be strengthened in monolinguals as they learn and develop proficiency in a second language because they will engage this process to inhibit one language when words or phrases are expressed in their other language. To test this hypothesis, the investigator will directly measure event-related brain potentials (electrical potentials generated by populations of neurons milliseconds after a cognitive event) and behavioral responses in monolinguals who are developing second-language proficiency while they perform non-linguistic, auditory, and visual tasks of attention. The longitudinal design will allow an assessment of whether efficiency of inhibitory control increases as second-language learning progresses. In addition, the work will address the national under-representation of minorities in the sciences by funding and mentoring graduate and undergraduate students at a university with an extremely large minority student population.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Systematics & Biodiversity Sci | Award Amount: 215.56K | Year: 2016

Bioluminescence, which is rare on land, is extremely common in the deep sea, being found in 80% of the animals living between 200 and 1000 meters depth. These animals rely on bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and/or defense; so, the generation and detection of light is essential to their survival. Our present knowledge of this phenomenon has been limited due to the difficulty in collecting live deep-sea animals, and the lack of proper techniques needed to study this complex system. However, new genomic techniques are now available, and a team with extensive experience in deep-sea biology, vision, and genomics has been assembled to lead this project. This project will study three questions 1) What are the evolutionary patterns of different types of bioluminescence in deep-sea shrimp? 2) How are deep-sea organisms eyes adapted to detect bioluminescence? 3) Can bioluminescent organs (called photophores) detect light in addition to emitting light? Findings from this study will provide valuable insight into a complex system vital to communication, defense, camouflage, and species recognition. This study will bring contributions to the fields of deep sea and evolutionary biology, and immediately improve our understanding of bioluminescence and light detection in the marine environment. In addition to scientific advancement, this project will reach kindergarten through college aged students through the development and dissemination of educational tools, a series of molecular and organismal-based workshops, museum exhibits, public seminars, and biodiversity initiatives.

This project combines phylogenomic, physiological, and molecular studies to test several hypotheses addressing the evolution of bioluminescence and light detection in a remarkable family of deep-sea shrimp. All shrimp within the family Oplophoridae use a luminescent secretion discharged from the mouth to deter predators, while only some possess a second mechanism of bioluminescence in the form of photophores. Photophores are light-emitting organs found across the body that are thought to function in counterillumination and mate attraction. These different types of bioluminescence emit light at slightly different wavelengths and spectral bandwidths. Past studies have shown shrimp with both the secretion and photophores possess unique visual systems to distinguish between these different bioluminescence types. However, an in-depth characterization, which combines genomic, molecular, and physiological methods, has never been applied to investigate this system. In addition, how animals with photophores can so precisely match the downwelling irradiance has remained a long-standing mystery. New preliminary evidence suggests that the photophores contain photopigment proteins (opsins) and other phototransduction genes that allow for light detection. This is the first indication that autogenic light organs may also have light detection capabilities. This raises the exciting possibility that some shrimp can see from structures other than their eyes and might provide a mechanism for their unique counterillumination abilities. The first objective is to use phylogenomic methods to build a robust phylogeny to trace the evolutionary origins of the two bioluminescence modes (secretion and photophore) within oplophorid shrimp. Secondly, this project will characterize the visual systems of deep-sea shrimp to better understand how shrimp distinguish between different wavelengths of emitted bioluminescence. Lastly, integrative methods will be used to examine photosensitivity in several non-bacterial (autogenic) light organs - the photophore and organs of Pesta (light organ of Sergestidae).


The invention provides compositions including epinephrine nanoparticles and methods for therapeutic use of the compositions in the treatment of conditions responsive to epinephrine such as a cardiac event or an allergic reaction, particularly anaphylaxis. The epinephrine nanoparticles can be incorporated into orally-disintegrating and fast-disintegrating tablet pharmaceutical formulations and can significantly increase the sublingual bioavailability of epinephrine, and thereby reduce the epinephrine dose required. Additionally, the invention provides methods for fabrication of stabilized epinephrine nanoparticles for use in the described compositions.


The invention provides compositions including epinephrine fine particles, including epinephrine nanoparticles or nanocrystals and epinephrine microparticles or microcrystals, and methods for therapeutic use of the compositions for the treatment of conditions responsive to epinephrine such as a cardiac event or an allergic reaction, particularly anaphylaxis. The epinephrine fine particles can be incorporated into orally-disintegrating and fast-disintegrating tablet pharmaceutical formulations and can significantly increase the sublingual bioavailability of epinephrine, and thereby reduce the epinephrine dose required.


The invention provides compositions including epinephrine nanoparticles and methods for therapeutic use of the compositions for the treatment of conditions responsive to epinephrine such as a cardiac event or an allergic reaction, particularly anaphylaxis. The epinephrine nanoparticles can be incorporated into orally-disintegrating and fast-disintegrating tablet pharmaceutical formulations and can significantly increase the sublingual bioavailability of epinephrine, and thereby reduce the epinephrine dose required. Additionally, the invention provides methods for fabrication of stabilized epinephrine nanoparticles for use in the described compositions.

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