Vejle, Denmark
Vejle, Denmark

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Kar I.B.,S C B Dental College and Hospital | Panda S.N.,Nose and Throat Surgery | Mishra N.,S C B Dental College and Hospital | Singh A.K.,S C B Dental College and Hospital
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology | Year: 2013

Background: Extrapulmonary sites of tuberculosis, which represent 15% of all sites, most commonly involve lymph nodes and bones. Facial bones and paranasal sinuses are rarely involved in the process. Tuberculosis of maxilla is an extremely rare condition, which usually presents with involvement of anterior wall of the maxillary sinus. Symptoms may include nasal discharge with partial nasal obstruction and mild pain. It still remains an underdiagnosed entity. Case Report: We report a case of tuberculoma of the whole left maxilla extending into the orbit, with no previous history of pulmonary tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of paranasal sinus is a rare entity and is nearly always secondary to pulmonary or extrapulmonary tuberculosis, but this report describes the incidence of primary infection of extrapulmonary site. Conclusions: Any chronic granulomatous lesion present over the maxillofacial region which does not respond to initial antibiotic therapy may be suspected as tubercular infection and should be ruled out with priority. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Hansen T.S.,University of Southern Denmark | Danielsson L.I.,Sydvestjysk Sygehus | Fast S.,Nose and Throat Surgery | Thygesen T.H.,University of Southern Denmark
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2016

We present a rare case of a 3-year-old boy with an odontogenic myxoma (OM) involving the orbita. Including our case, only nine cases of OM have been reported to involve the eye in children. There is no gold standard for treatment of OM in children with orbital involvement. The recurrence rate of OM in children seems low, which advocates for less invasive surgery. A gentle resection of the OM was carried out. The floor and medial wall of the orbit was reconstructed immediately using a non-resorbable Medpor implant with passive adaptation. Reconstruction with a Medpor implant in children has rarely been reported in the literature. No clinical or radiological recurrence was observed 24 months after surgical removal, and the patient presented with symmetric appearance and normal vision. Copyright 2016 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


De Araujo Jr. A.S.,Ricardo Ferreira Neurophysiology Clinics | Arlant P.A.,Ricardo Ferreira Neurophysiology Clinics | Salvestrini A.,Ricardo Ferreira Neurophysiology Clinics | Parise O.,Ricardo Ferreira Neurophysiology Clinics | And 6 more authors.
Neurosurgery Quarterly | Year: 2012

INTRODUCTION: "Os odontoideum" is a rare craniovertebral junction disease that presents itself as a dystopic ossicle from a hypoplastic C2 dens, contributing to a craniocervical instability. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: We report a 45-year-old woman harboring a dystopic os odontoideum, who sustained a progressive neurological deterioration with marked circumferential spinal cord compression. She was subjected to a prior posterior suboccipital craniectomy with occipitocervical fixation, followed by an anterior transoral- transpharyngeal odontoidectomy. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Both procedures were performed uneventfully, and the patient had a remarkable improvement afterward. We believe that our step-wise surgical management to os odontoideum is feasible and accomplishes excellent outcomes. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


PubMed | Sydvestjysk Sygehus, University of Southern Denmark and Nose and Throat Surgery
Type: | Journal: BMJ case reports | Year: 2016

We present a rare case of a 3-year-old boy with an odontogenic myxoma (OM) involving the orbita. Including our case, only nine cases of OM have been reported to involve the eye in children.There is no gold standard for treatment of OM in children with orbital involvement. The recurrence rate of OM in children seems low, which advocates for less invasive surgery. A gentle resection of the OM was carried out. The floor and medial wall of the orbit was reconstructed immediately using a non-resorbable Medpor implant with passive adaptation. Reconstruction with a Medpor implant in children has rarely been reported in the literature. No clinical or radiological recurrence was observed 24months after surgical removal, and the patient presented with symmetric appearance and normal vision.

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