Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies Oslo Norway

Oslo Norway, Norway

Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies Oslo Norway

Oslo Norway, Norway
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Valla L.,National Network for Infant Mental Health in Norway Center for Child and Adolescent Mental Health | Birkeland M.S.,Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies Oslo Norway | Hofoss D.,University of Oslo | Slinning K.,University of Oslo
Child: Care, Health and Development | Year: 2017

Background: There has been limited epidemiological research describing population-based samples regarding developmental pathways throughout infancy, and the research that exists has revealed substantial diversity. Identifying predictors for developmental pathways can inform early intervention services. Methods: The Ages and Stages Questionnaire was used to measure communication, gross motor, fine motor, problem-solving and personal-social skills longitudinally in a large, population-based sample of 1555 infants recruited from well-baby clinics in five municipalities in southeast Norway. We conducted latent class analyses to identify common pathways within the five developmental areas. Results: Our results indicated that most classes of infants showed generally positive and stable normative developmental pathways. However, for communication and gross motor areas, more heterogeneity was found. For gross motor development, a class of 10% followed a U-shaped curve. A class of 8% had a declining communication pathway and did not reach the level of the high stable communication class at 24 months. Low gestational age, low Apgar score, male sex, maternal depression symptoms, non-Scandinavian maternal ethnicity and high maternal education significantly predict less beneficial communication pathways. Conclusion: The results suggest that infants with low gestational age, low Apgar score, male sex and a mother with depression symptoms or non-Scandinavian ethnicity may be at risk of developing less beneficial developmental pathways, especially within the communication area. Targeting these infants for surveillance and support might be protective against delayed development in several areas during a critical window of development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Bugge I.,University of Oslo | Dyb G.,University of Oslo | Stensland S.O.,University of Oslo | Ekeberg O.,University of Oslo | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Traumatic Stress | Year: 2017

Physically injured trauma survivors have particularly high risk for later somatic complaints and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). However, the potential mediating role of PTSS linking injury to later somatic complaints has been poorly investigated. In this study, survivors (N = 255) were interviewed longitudinally at 2 timepoints after the terror attack on Utøya Island, Norway, in 2011. Assessments included injury sustained during the attack, PTSS (after 4-5 months), somatic complaints (after 14-15 months), and background factors. Causal mediation analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential mediating role of PTSS in linking injury to somatic complaints comparing 2 groups of injured survivors with noninjured survivors. For the nonhospitalized injured versus the noninjured survivors, the mediated pathway was significant (average causal mediation effect; ACME = 0.09, p = .028, proportion = 55.8%). For the hospitalized versus the noninjured survivors, the mediated pathway was not significant (ACME = 0.04, p = .453, proportion = 11.6%). PTSS may play a significant mediating role in the development of somatic complaints among nonhospitalized injured trauma survivors. Intervening health professionals should be aware of this possible pathway to somatic complaints. © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

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