Norwegian Academy of Music

nmh.no
Oslo, Norway

The Norwegian Academy of Music is a music conservatory located in Oslo, Norway, in the neighbourhood of Majorstuen, Frogner. It is the largest music academy in Norway and offers the country's highest level of music education. As a university college, it offers both undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Throughout the years the Academy has educated many of Norway’s most renowned musicians.The Norwegian Academy of Music educates performers, composers and pedagogues, and attempts to lay the foundation for research within various fields of music. It educates musicians within folk music genres, church music, classical music and, quite notably in later years, a string of successful performers within the jazz realm. The Academy is also Oslo’s biggest concert organizer, presenting approximately 300 concerts a year. As is the case with all schools in the Norwegian educational system, the school is free of charge. Students can only be accepted by auditioning and/or other verifiable qualifications. Wikipedia.


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Jensenius A.R.,University of Oslo | Johnson V.,Norwegian Academy of Music
Computer Music Journal | Year: 2012

This article presents the development of the improvisation piece Transformation for electric violin and live electronics. The aim of the project was to develop an "invisible" technological setup that would allow the performer to move freely on stage while still being in full control of the electronics. The developed system consists of a video-based motion-tracking system, with a camera hanging in the ceiling above the stage. The performer's motion and position on stage is used to control the playback of sonic fragments from a database of violin sounds, using concatenative synthesis as the sound engine. The setup allows the performer to improvise freely together with the electronic sounds being played back as she moves around the "sonic space." The system has been stable in rehearsal and performance, and the simplicity of the approach has been inspiring to both the performer and the audience. © 2013 Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Jensenius A.R.,University of Oslo | Bjerkestrand K.A.V.,BodyMindFlow | Johnson V.,Norwegian Academy of Music
International Journal of Arts and Technology | Year: 2014

In this paper, we present the results of a series of observation studies of the three team members standing still for ten minutes at a time. The aim has been to understand more about people's ability to stand still, and to develop a heightened sensitivity for micromovements and how they might be used in music and dance performances. The quantity of motion, calculated from motion capture data using a head marker, was remarkably similar for each person who stood still. The 'best' results - that is, the least movement - were obtained when the subject set his/her feet at the width of the shoulders, locked the knees, and kept the eyes open. No correlation was found between quantity of motion and type of mental coping strategy, though we remain convinced that mental strategies influence the experience of standing still. These findings will be used to inform the development of a stage performance focused on micromovements. Copyright 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.


Guettler K.,Norwegian Academy of Music | Askenfelt A.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Buen A.,Brekke Strand Akustikk As
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America | Year: 2012

The question whether or not double basses can benefit from a compliant and radiating stage floor in the low end of their tonal register, similar to the well-known tuning fork-tabletop effect, was examined through field experiments in five concert halls. The topic comprises several aspects: (1) How well the mechanical impedances of double basses and the stage floor match, (2) amount of vibration velocity transmitted to the floor through the end pin of the bass, and (3) radiation efficiency of point-excited bending waves in the stage floor far below the coincidence frequency. Each aspect represents a prerequisite for the tuning fork-tabletop effect to take place. The input impedance at the end pin was measured for three representative double basses. The stage floors of five orchestra halls were measured with respect input impedance and damping, while sound radiation to the audience area was measured for two of them. In Lindeman Hall, Oslo, all conditions for the tuning fork-tabletop effect to take place were clearly met. The contribution from the stage-floor radiation to the sound pressure level in the audience area was found to be about 5 dB between 40 and 60 Hz, and even higher between 30 and 40 Hz. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.


PubMed | Norwegian School of Sport Sciences and Norwegian Academy of Music
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in psychology | Year: 2016

The goals of the present study are to evaluate, implement, and adapt psychological skills used in the realm of sports into music performance. This research project also aims to build foundations on how to implement future interventions to guide music students on how to optimize practice toward performance. A 2-month psychological skills intervention was provided to two students from the national music academys bachelor program in music performance to better understand how to adapt and construct psychological skills training programs for performing music students. The program evaluated multiple intervention tools including the use of questionnaires, performance profiling, iPads, electronic practice logs, recording the perceived value of individual and combined work, as well as the effectiveness of different communication forms. Perceived effects of the intervention were collected through semi-structured interviews, observations, and logs.


Trondalen G.,Norwegian Academy of Music
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy | Year: 2016

The purpose of this research study was to explore resource-oriented Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (R-oGIM) as a creative health resource for professional musicians and music students. The research method was qualitative and explorative, inspired by an interpretive phenomenological procedure to analyse the data. The theory was informed by an intersubjective perspective, as well as context-sensitive theory related to identity and health. The data incorporated transcripts from the musical journey, drawings, verbal conversations and semi-structured interviews performed after the R-oGIM sessions were completed. The results suggested that R-oGIM could be experienced as a creative health resource in different ways for professional musicians and music students. The outcome arose first from R-oGIM as strengthening of professional identity underpinned by the relationship with the primary instrument, the job, music listening and the musician herself as a person. Second, the result showed nurturing of personal and professional resources emerging from the themes self-awareness, self-agency, the process of moving along and integration. On this basis, a resource-oriented GIM approach is suggested – individualized or in groups – in order to integrate and balance the physical/mental and existential dimensions of a musician’s life, while supporting excellence in teaching and performance and an enriched personal life. © 2014 The Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre.


Guettler K.,Norwegian Academy of Music | Thelin H.,Norwegian Academy of Music
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America | Year: 2012

By carefully positioning the bow and a lightly touching finger on the string, the string spectrum can be conditioned to provide narrow bands of pronounced energy. This leaves the impression of multiple complex tones with the normal (Helmholtz) fundamental as the lowest pitch. The phenomenon is seen to be caused by two additional signal loops, one on each side of the finger, which through the repeating slip pattern get phase locked to the full loop of the fundamental. Within the nominal period, however, the slip pulses will not be uniform like they are during the production of a normal harmonic or flageolet but may vary considerably in shape, size, and timing. For each string, there is a large number of bow/finger combinations that bear the potential of producing such tones. There are also two classes, depending on whether the bow or the finger is situated closest to the bridge. Touching the string with the finger closest to the bridge will somewhat emphasize the (Helmholtz) fundamental. The technique is applicable to double bass and cello, while less practical on shorter-stringed instruments. Analyses based on impulse responses and the Poisson summation formula provide an explanation to the underlying system properties. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.


Thoresen L.,Norwegian Academy of Music | Hedman A.,Norwegian Academy of Music
Organised Sound | Year: 2010

This paper will present methods for the analysis of form-building patterns in general, formulating analytical principles across stylistic borders. We will demonstrate the use of two selected analytical tools on a specific work by the Swedish composer Åke Parmerud. We identify, firstly, time-fields which describe the segmentation of form sections and, secondly, dynamic forms tracing the perceived directions of energy flow. Eventually we will discuss a semiotic interpretation of the music analysed. The present paper is a continuation of two previous papers that have presented conceptual and graphic tools for an aural, spectromorphological analysis of music. The first paper, published in Organised Sound 12/2, demonstrated the spectromorphological categories for the transcription of sound objects (level one). The second paper, published in Organised Sound 14/3, demonstrated their application, and expanded the scope of analysis through a discussion of the Schaefferian terms of values/characters. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010.


Stensaeth K.,Norwegian Academy of Music
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being | Year: 2013

The point of departure in this text is the ongoing qualitative interdisciplinary research project RHYME (www.RHYME.no), which addresses the lack of health-promoting interactive and musical Information and Communications Technology (ICT) for families with children with severe disabilities. The project explores a new treatment paradigm based on collaborative, tangible, interactive net-based musical "smart things" with multimedia capabilities. The goal in RHYME is twofold: (1) to reduce isolation and passivity, and (2) to promote health and well-being. Co-creation is suggested as a possible path to achieving these goals, by evoking feelings, for example, or accommodating the needs to act and to create social relations; cocreation also motivates users to communicate and collaborate within (new) social relations. This article engages co-creation by incorporating aspects connected to interaction design and the field of music and health. Empirical observations will be referred to. The research question is as follows: What might co-creation imply for families of children with disabilities when musical and interactive tangibles are used as health-promoting implements? © 2013 K. StenÆsth.


PubMed | Norwegian Academy of Music
Type: | Journal: International journal of qualitative studies on health and well-being | Year: 2013

The point of departure in this text is the ongoing qualitative interdisciplinary research project RHYME (www.RHYME.no), which addresses the lack of health-promoting interactive and musical Information and Communications Technology (ICT) for families with children with severe disabilities. The project explores a new treatment paradigm based on collaborative, tangible, interactive net-based musical smart things with multimedia capabilities. The goal in RHYME is twofold: (1) to reduce isolation and passivity, and (2) to promote health and well-being. Co-creation is suggested as a possible path to achieving these goals, by evoking feelings, for example, or accommodating the needs to act and to create social relations; co-creation also motivates users to communicate and collaborate within (new) social relations. This article engages co-creation by incorporating aspects connected to interaction design and the field of music and health. Empirical observations will be referred to. The research question is as follows: What might co-creation imply for families of children with disabilities when musical and interactive tangibles are used as health-promoting implements?


PubMed | Norwegian Academy of Music
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in psychology | Year: 2016

The purpose of the present mixed method study was to investigate personal benefits, perceptions, and the effect of a 15-week sport psychological skills training program adapted for musicians. The program was individually tailored for six music performance students with the objective of facilitating the participants instrumental practice and performance. The participants learnt techniques such as goal setting, attentional focus, arousal regulation, imagery, and acceptance training/self-talk. Zimmermans (1989) cyclical model of self-regulated learning was applied as a theoretical frame for the intervention. The present studys mixed-method approach (i.e., quan+ QUAL) included effect size, semi-structured interviews, a research log, and practice diaries of the participants (Creswell, 2009). Thematic analysis revealed that participants had little or no experience concerning planning and goal setting in regard to instrumental practice. Concentration, volition, and physical pain were additional issues that the participants struggled with at the time of pre-intervention. The study found that psychological skills training (with special emphasis on planning and goal setting) facilitated cyclical self-regulated learning patterns in the participants. In essence, the intervention was found to facilitate the participants concentration, self-observation, self-efficacy, and coping in the face of failure. The appliance of practice journals facilitated the participants self-observation, self-evaluation, and awareness of instrumental practice. Finally, the psychological skills intervention reduced participants worry and anxiety in performance situations. An 8-month follow up interview revealed that the participants were still actively applying psychological skills.

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