Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Montana, MT, United States

Lanning S.P.,Montana State University | Martin J.M.,Montana State University | Stougaard R.N.,Northwestern Agriculture Res Center | Guillen-Portal F.R.,Sustainable Oils LLC | And 7 more authors.
Crop Science | Year: 2012

The most common genes for semidwarf habit in modern wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars are found at the Rht-B1 and Rht-D1 loci on chromosomes 4B and 4D, respectively. An alternative gene for semidwarf habit, Rht8, has shown potential as a replacement for Rht- B1b and Rht-D1b in some environments. The objective of the present study was to assess the impact of the height-reducing gene Rht8 relative to Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b on performance of spring wheat in Montana and Washington environments characterized by terminal drought stress. Evaluation of near-isogenic lines developed in four genetic backgrounds showed that Rht-B1b, Rht-D1b, and Rht8 caused height reduction of 19, 20, and 6.5%, respectively, relative to wildtype near-isogenic lines over 12 environments. An increase in grain yield was associated with reduced height for lines containing Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b based on means over the four genetic backgrounds and 10 environments. Height reduction and yield increase associated with Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b were significant in most environments. Lines with Rht8 yielded less than wild-type based on means over environments and in 3 of 10 individual environments. Reduced height lines with Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b tended to have a higher harvest index and more seed per spike than wild-type lines and reduced height lines with Rht8. In sum, our results suggest that Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b are superior to Rht8 as a source for height reduction for spring wheat in the tested environments. © Crop Science Society of America. Source


Blake N.K.,Montana State University | Clark D.,Monsanto Corporation | Lanning S.P.,Montana State University | Carlson G.R.,Northern Agriculture Res Center | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2013

'WB9879CLP' hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) (Reg. No. CV-1086, PI 666046) was developed by the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2012 to the commercial partner Westbred, a subsidiary of Monsanto. WB9879CLP is a two-gene Clearfield wheat for use with the imidazolinone herbicide Beyond (BASF). WB9879CLP was developed by backcrossing alleles for resistance to the imidazolinone herbicide class into the recurrent parent 'Choteau'. Choteau has solid stems, which provide resistance to the wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus Nort.). The wheat stem sawfly is a major yield-reducing pest in large areas of Montana and surrounding regions. Alleles for herbicide resistance at TaAHAS1D and TaAHAS1B were selected during the backcrossing process and line derivation using polymerase chain reaction markers developed by BASF. Two years of replicated yield trials at a total of 16 sites showed that WB9879CLP is similar to Choteau in most agronomic characteristics. WB9879CLP showed no symptoms of damage at any of 13 testing sites when imidazolinone herbicide was applied at two times the recommended rate. WB9879CLP is the first Clearfield solid-stem wheat variety for sawfly infested sites in Montana and adjoining regions. © Crop Science Society of America. Source


Lanning S.P.,Montana State University | Kephart K.,Southern Agriculture Res Center | Carlson G.R.,Northern Agriculture Res Center | Eckhoff J.E.,Eastern Agriculture Res Center | And 4 more authors.
Crop Science | Year: 2010

Increasing temperatures are a threat to hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in the northern Great Plains and may impact objectives for breeding programs. Weather data and agronomic performance of experimental lines and a check cultivar 'Thatcher' were compiled for six sites in Montana for 1950 to 2007. Mean annual temperature increased significantly at five sites. March temperature increased significantly at all sites, and planting date has become significantly earlier at a rate of 0.24 d yr-1. Grain yield of Thatcher increased significantly at a rate of 23.5 kg ha-1 yr-1. July temperatures increased significantly at two sites. July temperatures showed a significant negative correlation with grain yield at three sites and with grain volume weight at three sites. Nursery means over years as adjusted for Thatcher was used as a measure of genetic change and showed significantly increased grain yield and significantly earlier heading date. Our results suggest that earlier planting due to warmer spring temperatures has helped to alleviate negative effects of high temperatures during grain filling periods. Genetic changes in breeding materials have also contributed to increased yield potential, partially due to earlier heading and avoidance of July heat. Projection of increasing temperatures suggests the need for management and breeding strategies to insure productivity of hard red spring wheat in the northern Great Plains. © Crop Science Society of America. Source


Blake N.K.,Montana State University | Stougaard R.N.,Northwestern Agriculture Res Center | Bohannon B.,Northwestern Agriculture Res Center | Weaver D.K.,Montana State University | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2014

'Egan'q hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) (Reg. No. 1102, PI 671855) was developed by the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2014. Egan is intended for production in areas of Montana infested with the orange wheat blossom midge (OWBM) (Sitodiplosis mosellana Gehin). Egan is resistant to OWBM due to antibiosis conferred by resistance gene Sm1. Egan also contains a chromosome segment originally introgressed into wheat from T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides containing a gene for high protein (Gpc-B1) and a gene for stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici) resistance (Yr36). Egan has shown high yield potential and high grain protein in nurseries grown under OWBM pressure in the Flathead Valley of Montana. Egan is the first hard red spring wheat cultivar with resistance to OWBM developed for Montana. © Crop Science Society of America. All rights reserved. Source


Lanning S.P.,Montana State University | Carlson G.R.,Northern Agriculture Res Center | Lamb P.F.,Northern Agriculture Res Center | Nash D.,Montana State University | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

'Duclair' hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) (Reg. No. CV-1060, PI 660981) was developed by the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station and released in 2011. The objective for the development of Duclair was to provide a solid-stemmed, semidwarf cultivar for areas infested by the wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus Nort.). Duclair was developed through initial generations of single seed descent of F2 seed from a 'Choteau'/MT0249 cross. Progeny lines were selected to have solid stems from Choteau, and extended green leaf duration from MT0249. Duclair was tested as MT0832 at sites across Montana in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Stem solidity of Duclair is similar to the solid-stemmed cultivar 'Fortuna' and slightly less than 'Choteau'. Duclair has shown good yield potential throughout Montana and its height is more desirable for dry conditions than Choteau. Duclair has grain protein levels similar to other hard red spring wheat cultivars and acceptable milling and baking characteristics. Duclair will be of interest to wheat growers in sawfly-infested areas of Montana and adjoining regions. © Crop Science Society of America. Source

Discover hidden collaborations