Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

Northumbria University, officially the University of Northumbria at Newcastle, is a university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the North East of England. A former polytechnic, it was established as one of the new universities in 1992. It is a member of the University Alliance. It is the second university of Newcastle, along with Newcastle University. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Michigan and Northumbria University | Date: 2017-04-05

The present disclosure relates to compositions and methods for destabilizing biofilms, altering biofilm 3D structure, and dispersing biofilms, in order to enhance biofilm cell removal and/or sensitivity to other agents (e.g., environmental or co-applied treatments). In particular, the present disclosure relates to the use of L-arginine in the removal and/or sensitization (e.g., to antimicrobials) of microorganisms in medical, industrial, domestic, or environmental applications, as well as treatment of bacterial infections (e.g., in biofilms).


Errington R.J.,Northumbria University
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry | Year: 2017

Dynamic aspects of polyoxometalate chemistry are often overlooked because of difficulties in monitoring subtle structural and/or speciation changes in solution. This chapter features the nonaqueous approaches to polyoxometalate synthesis being developed in our laboratory as a platform for detailed and systematic reactivity studies. Methods based on metal alkoxide hydrolysis are described that provide access to a range of substituted (M2W4) and (MW5) Lindqvist-type polyoxometalates containing reactive (MX)n+ heterometal sites, and examples are given that highlight the importance of 17O NMR as a tool for monitoring solution reactivity. Lindqvist-type (XTiW5) and (XSnW5) and related Keggin-type (XMPW11) anions are compared, and significant differences in their hydrolysis and condensation behaviors are discussed in relation to DFT studies. The solution reactivity observed upon halide abstraction from (ClTiW5) or protonation of ((RO)TiW5) species is rationalized in terms of a common difunctional reactive intermediate [TiW5O18]2-, which has been characterized in its dimeric form. Following the identification of diprotonated [(μ-O)(TiW5O18H)2]4- a new type of polyoxometalate ligand behavior is proposed, based on the characterization of [(μ-O)(TiW5O18)2(SnMe2)]4-, 17O NMR studies of reactions with electrophiles, and DFT studies of [(μ-O)(TiW5O18)2(AuCl)]4-. The final section describes nonaqueous reductive aggregation reactions of (TBA)3[PMo12O40] that have produced a family of electron-rich anions of the type α-[PMo12O40(ML n ) z ]x-, and the reductive degradation of (TBA)2[Mo6O19] to give the tetra-capped e(open)-[Mo13O40H4(Mg(DMSO)3)4]2+. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Roberts G.,Northumbria University
Behavioral and Brain Sciences | Year: 2017

Maestripieri et al. provide an important service in highlighting prosocial biases toward attractive people from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Here I comment on the conceptual and critical side of their review of evolutionary psychology studies. I propose that further work should be focused on understanding the role of signaling in prosocial behavior. © Cambridge University Press 2017.


Cockton G.,Northumbria University
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings | Year: 2016

Over the last two decades, creative and strategic design approaches have become increasingly prevalent in the development of interactive technologies, but tensions exist with longer established approaches such as human factors engineering and user-centered design. These tensions can be harnessed productively by giving equal status in principle to creative, business and engineering practices and developing approaches and resources that can balance and integrate a range of multidisciplinary design practices. © 2016 Authors.


Buie E.,Northumbria University
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings | Year: 2016

This late-breaking work describes the design and application of a game to facilitate techno-spiritual design. In it I report the results of 24 interviews with people of diverse spiritual perspectives and three "Transcendhance" design game workshops involving 12 participants; I describe design fictions arising from these activities; and I discuss issues and challenges of designing a game to enable people to explore indescribable experiences and create design ideas in an atmosphere of fun and play. My work bridges the domains of user experience and spiritual experience, aiming to gain insight into design for enhancing experiences of something beyond oneself. Spiritual experiences are tricky to define, difficult to discuss, impossible to predict, and challenging to address in design, so I used a game to explore the design space. © 2016 Authors.


Understanding site formation processes is essential before we can make inferences about human behaviour, and a key part of the inferential process is the integration of multiple, diverse lines of evidence. The term ‘multiproxy’ has become increasingly used in studies of use of space, particularly in geoarchaeology, to describe an approach in which multiple methods are combined to reduce the impact of equifinality of interpretation. Since the early 1990s this integration has been an aim of the reflexive methodology at the Neolithic settlement of Çatalhöyük. Methods including sediment micromorphology, microartefact patterning and geochemical analyses of floors and wall plasters, phytoliths and starch, alongside artefact studies, macrobotanical and zooarchaeological analysis have all provided insights, but there is still a gap between macroscale and microscale approaches, and integration has not always been successful. Considering the history of analytical approaches at this site provides an opportunity to reflect on how we acquire and interpret archaeological science data, and the relationship between multiproxy and multivocality. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Finnigan S.M.,Northumbria University
CSCW 2017 - Companion of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing | Year: 2017

Services which make use of low-cost pervasive sensor systems have the potential to support evidence-based management, decision support, service provisioning and sustainable policy design in non-domestic buildings. My research aims to understand the sociotechnical factors in the investigation of such systems through deployment case-studies with facilities managers, office workers, and students. I provide recommendations for the design of repurposeable, redeployable and retrofittable sensor toolkits for understanding conditions within the local built environment, utilising that understanding in digital services to provide new perspectives on environmental complaints (e.g. thermal comfort), and creating policy recommendations towards the sustainable management of building infrastructure.


Bowden A.,Northumbria University
Landscape Research | Year: 2017

This paper explores the spatial dimensions of a northern landscape – the Flodden battlefield. This is the focal site of the Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum; the centre to a network of 40 other sites around the United Kingdom which together interpret the Flodden story. However, this distributed network does not fit easily with the foundational ecomuseum concept of ‘territory’ as the boundary around a shared heritage, memory and community. The relative merits of three concepts of ecomuseums are discussed in relation to the Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum. Inspired by Doreen Massey’s interpretation of space, this study explores multiple dimensions of Flodden space through four semiautobiographical journeys to the Flodden battlefield during the author’s life: as a family holiday; a teenager with interest in military strategy; an early career field geologist; a project manager working with the local community and artists. The article concludes by suggesting the word territory may not be appropriate for ecomuseums: it suggests that Peter Davis’s favoured term place may be an improvement; however, it ends by proposing that space may be an even better word for the geographic context of ecomuseums. © 2017 Landscape Research Group Ltd


Crawshaw J.,Northumbria University
Landscape Research | Year: 2017

A knowledge exchange programme exploring the role of art in relation to the planning context of the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, this paper explores the role of artistic knowledge in making landscape. During 2013, 25 artistic workshops were developed in collaboration with residents and planning officials, resulting in an exhibition of works produced. From a pragmatist perspective this paper draws on ethnographic accounts of the realisation of the exhibition to reveal artistic knowledge exchange as ‘relational knowing’. The contribution of the paper is to recommend we account for artistic work as an ingredient of landscape planning. Although specifically drawing on fieldwork in Holy Island the experiential nature of this article makes a novel contribution across the field of rural planning. © 2017 Landscape Research Group Ltd


Robinson M.,Northumbria University
Recent Results in Cancer Research | Year: 2017

The pathology laboratory has a central role in providing human papillomavirus (HPV) tests for patients with head and neck cancer. There is an extensive literature around HPV testing and a large number of proprietary HPV tests, which makes the field difficult to navigate. This review provides a concise contemporary overview of the evidence around HPV testing in head and neck cancer and signposts key publications, guideline documents and the most commonly used methods in clinical practice. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017.


Munkley J.,Northumbria University
Endocrine-Related Cancer | Year: 2017

Changes in glycan composition are common in cancer and can play important roles in all of the recognised hallmarks of cancer. We recently identified glycosylation as a global target for androgen control in prostate cancer cells and further defined a set of 8 glycosylation enzymes (GALNT7, ST6GalNAc1, GCNT1, UAP1, PGM3, CSGALNACT1, ST6GAL1 and EDEM3), which are also significantly upregulated in prostate cancer tissue. These 8 enzymes are under direct control of the androgen receptor (AR) and are linked to the synthesis of important cancer-associated glycans such as sialyl-Tn (sTn), sialyl LewisX (SLeX), O-GlcNAc and chondroitin sulfate. Glycosylation has a key role in many important biological processes in cancer including cell adhesion, migration, interactions with the cell matrix, immune surveillance, cell signalling and cellular metabolism. Our results suggest that alterations in patterns of glycosylation via androgen control might modify some or all of these processes in prostate cancer. The prostate is an abundant secretor of glycoproteins of all types, and alterations in glycans are, therefore, attractive as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Emerging data on these often overlooked glycan modifications have the potential to improve risk stratification and therapeutic strategies in patients with prostate cancer. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology Printed in Great Britain.


Lewis R.J.,Northumbria University
Molecular Microbiology | Year: 2017

Peptidoglycan (PG), an essential stress-bearing component of the bacterial cell wall, is synthesised by penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). PG synthesis at the cell division septum is necessary for constructing new poles of progeny cells, and cells cannot elongate without inserting new PG in the side-wall. The cell division regulator GpsB appears to coordinate PG synthesis at the septum during division and at the side-wall during elongation in rod-shaped and ovococcoid Gram-positive bacteria. How the control over PG synthesis is exerted is unknown. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Rued et al. show that in pneumococci GpsB forms complexes with PBP2a and PBP2b, and that deletion or depletion of GpsB prevents closure of the septal ring that in itself is PBP2x-dependent. Loss of GpsB can be suppressed by spontaneous mutations, including within the gene encoding the only PP2C Ser/Thr phosphatase in Streptococcus pneumoniae, indicating that GpsB plays a key – but unknown – role in protein phosphorylation in pneumococci. Rued et al. combine phenotypic and genotypic analyses of mutant strains that suggest discrepancies in the literature concerning GpsB might have arisen from accumulation of unidentified suppressors, highlighting the importance and power of strain validation and whole genome sequencing in this context. © 2016 The Authors.


MacGowan G.A.,Northumbria University
ASAIO Journal | Year: 2017

To manage myocardial recovery in patients with the HeartWare left ventricular assist device (HVAD), we describe a minimally invasive approach (‘decommissioning’) that involves disconnecting the driveline and occluding the outflow tract through a small left thoracotomy incision leaving the device in situ, in conjunction with optimal medical therapies and comprehensive assessment of left ventricular recovery. Nine patients (all male, 37 ± 12 years, all non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy) had an HVAD implanted for 766±343 days. When left ventricular function improved to mild impairment by echocardiography, patients underwent assessment at reduced flow (2578±148 to 1822±67 rpm) with documentation of compensated right heart hemodynamics and ejection fraction 52±8%. Eight of nine patients underwent decommissioning, and 1 patient had a hybrid procedure of percutaneous occlusion of outflow graft and surgical division of driveline. 2 patients died post operatively at 413 days (sepsis) and 810 days (heart failure). In conclusion, in selected patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy a prolonged period of HVAD support in conjunction with heart failure medications can lead to recovery of left ventricular function. Surgical decommissioning is then an option to remove these patients from support. These patients are however not ‘cured’ and remain at risk for future deterioration in ventricular function and infections. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs


Salmonowicz H.,Northumbria University | Passos J.F.,Northumbria University
Aging Cell | Year: 2017

Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible cell cycle arrest induced by different types of cellular stresses. The field of senescence has made significant advances in the understanding of many of the mechanisms governing this phenomenon; however, a universal biomarker that unambiguously distinguishes senescent from proliferating cells has not been found. In this issue of Aging Cell, Evangelou and colleagues developed a sensitive method for identification of senescent cells in different types of biological material based on the detection of lipofuscin using an analogue of Sudan Black B (SBB) histochemical dye coupled with biotin, which they named GL13. The authors propose that this method is more sensitive and versatile than using SBB alone. Lipofuscin, a nondegradable oxidation product of lipids, proteins and metals, is found in senescent cells. Detection of lipofuscin using GL13 staining may be a more feasible method than others currently used for identification of senescent cells both in cell culture and tissues. © 2017 The Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Kenter J.O.,Scottish Association for Marine Science | Reed M.S.,Northumbria University | Fazey I.,University of Dundee
Ecosystem Services | Year: 2016

It is increasingly argued that preferences and values for complex goods such as ecosystem services are not pre-formed but need to be generated through a process of deliberation and learning. While the number of studies incorporating deliberation in monetary and non-monetary valuation of ecosystem services is increasing, there is a limited theoretical basis to how values are influenced and shaped in social valuation processes. In this paper we present the Deliberative Value Formation (DVF) model, a new theoretical model for deliberative valuation informed by social-psychological theory. Anchored within a broader theoretical framework around shared and plural values, the DVF model identifies a range of potential positive (e.g. learning) and negative (e.g. social desirability bias) outcomes of deliberation and key factors that influence outcomes (e.g. ability to deliberate, institutional factors, power dynamics). It also conceptualises how values may be formed by ‘translating’ transcendental values, our principles and life goals, into more specific contextual values. Underpinned by this theoretical model, we present a six-step template for designing deliberative valuation processes. The DVF provides a theoretical and methodological framework for more rigorous monetary and non-monetary deliberative valuation, and enables more effective integration of social learning and plural knowledges and values in valuation and decision-making. © 2016 The Authors


OBJECTIVE:: To determine whether TDF-associated renal tubular dysfunction is associated with evidence of mitochondrial injury in urine. DESIGN:: Single centre cross-sectional observational study of HIV positive outpatients. METHODS:: Biochemistry was performed on paired serum and urine samples. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was studied by real-time PCR and long-range PCR on cellular fractions of urine. RESULTS:: 48 subjects were enrolled of whom half were TDF-treated. Mean age was 43 years. 58% had eGFR ≥90, with no differences between ART treatment groups. Urinary phosphate wasting was common and independently associated with TDF exposure (p?=?0.02). No subjects had low molecular weight proteinuria. Cellular mtDNA content in urine was heavily influenced by the cellularity of the sample. The mtDNA ‘common deletion’ mutation (CD) was detectable significantly more commonly in the urine of TDF exposed subjects compared with unexposed (13/22 TDF+ subjects (59%), 4/21 TDF- (19%), p?=?0.01). CD levels were not associated with age, eGFR or urinary phosphate wasting. No mtDNA measures were associated with current or nadir CD4 lymphocyte counts, duration of disease or anti-retroviral therapy, or historical exposure to NRTIs with systemic mitochondrial toxicity. CONCLUSIONS:: The presence of mtDNA mutations in the context of TDF exposure adds weight to the hypothesis that TDF associated renal damage is at least in part mitochondrially-mediated. The assessment of mtDNA markers in urine may be a feasible non-invasive investigation for TDF-treated patients. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.


Toft K.,Northumbria University
Current Opinion in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery | Year: 2017

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to examine the current state of the art of dysphagia intervention delivery description and to propose use of a new tool to facilitate this: the behaviour change technique taxonomy version 1 (BCTTv1). RECENT FINDINGS: Describing intervention delivery is difficult, and published research in the field of speech and language therapy (SLT) does not include detail on this key aspect of research protocols. Interventions themselves are often poorly delineated, and a way is needed of classifying how these interventions are delivered in practice. SUMMARY: Use of the BCTTv1 would facilitate clarity and transparency in intervention delivery description and have positive implications for research, clinical practice and undergraduate teaching if employed by the SLT profession. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Hurren A.,Northumbria University
Current Opinion in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery | Year: 2017

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A consensus and body of robust evidence has developed regarding optimal laryngeal voice outcome measures. This contrasts with a lack of clarity for equivalent assessments in alaryngeal voice. Addressing this situation would enable clinicians to select the best tools currently available to facilitate research, audit and clinical practice. This is important because of the limited knowledge regarding the optimal surgical or reconstruction techniques and rehabilitation regimes for the laryngectomy population. RECENT FINDINGS: There is currently no evidence to support the use of acoustic instrumental measures in terms of validity. Preliminary data support the validity of a new tracheoesophageal voice auditory–perceptual tool the SToPS, for professional and naive raters. Few specific self-rating tools exist with the Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngectomy having the most evidence regarding validity, reliability and clinical utility. Laryngeal self-report questionnaires have been utilized, but concerns have been expressed regarding content validity. Patient self-report outcomes do not concur with professional or naive judgements, which reflect findings in the laryngeal voice literature. SUMMARY: Further research is needed to establish the optimal tools for research and clinical practice. Investigations should also incorporate assessments of real-life communication in daily living rather than solely focussing on recordings in laboratory conditions. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Deary V.,Northumbria University
Molecular Psychiatry | Year: 2017

Self-reported tiredness and low energy, often called fatigue, are associated with poorer physical and mental health. Twin studies have indicated that this has a heritability between 6 and 50%. In the UK Biobank sample (N=108 976), we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of responses to the question, ‘Over the last two weeks, how often have you felt tired or had little energy?’ Univariate GCTA-GREML found that the proportion of variance explained by all common single-nucleotide polymorphisms for this tiredness question was 8.4% (s.e.=0.6%). GWAS identified one genome-wide significant hit (Affymetrix id 1:64178756_C_T; P=1.36 × 10-11). Linkage disequilibrium score regression and polygenic profile score analyses were used to test for shared genetic aetiology between tiredness and up to 29 physical and mental health traits from GWAS consortia. Significant genetic correlations were identified between tiredness and body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, forced expiratory volume, grip strength, HbA1c, longevity, obesity, self-rated health, smoking status, triglycerides, type 2 diabetes, waist–hip ratio, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, neuroticism, schizophrenia and verbal-numerical reasoning (absolute rg effect sizes between 0.02 and 0.78). Significant associations were identified between tiredness phenotypic scores and polygenic profile scores for BMI, HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, coronary artery disease, C-reactive protein, HbA1c, height, obesity, smoking status, triglycerides, type 2 diabetes, waist–hip ratio, childhood cognitive ability, neuroticism, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia (standardised β’s had absolute values<0.03). These results suggest that tiredness is a partly heritable, heterogeneous and complex phenomenon that is phenotypically and genetically associated with affective, cognitive, personality and physiological processes.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 14 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.5. © 2017 The Author(s)


McCabe W.A.,Northumbria University
Psychiatric Genetics | Year: 2017

Associations between the γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAA) and alcohol dependence risk have been reported, although the receptor subunit driving the association is unclear. Recent work in mice has highlighted a possible role for variants in the Gabr β1 subunit (Gabrβ1) in alcohol dependence risk, although this gene does not contain any common nonsynonymous variants in humans. However, the GABAA receptor is a heteropentamer so multiple potential variants within the gene complex could generate the alcohol dependence phenotype. The association between GABRβ1 variants and alcohol dependence risk was explored in a British and Irish population of alcohol-dependent cases (n=450) and ancestrally-matched controls screened to exclude current or historical alcohol misuse (n=555). Twelve common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a rare nonsynonymous variant, rs41311286, were directly genotyped; imputation was then performed across the whole gene. No allelic association was observed between alcohol dependence risk and any of the directly genotyped or imputed SNPs. However, post-hoc testing for genotypic association identified five common intronic SNPs that showed modest evidence for association after correction for multiple testing; two, rs76112682 and rs141719901, were in complete linkage disequilibrium [Pcorrected=0.02, odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=5.9 (1.7–2.06)]. These findings provide limited support for an association between GABRβ1 and the risk for developing alcohol dependence; further testing in expanded cohorts may be warranted. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


OBJECTIVES:: Dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) particularly in short-term clinical trials. Whether these effects are sustained in the long-term remains to be established. The objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that examined whether dietary nitrate supplementation for more than 1 week has beneficial effects on SBP and DBP. METHODS:: Electronic databases were searched from inception until May 2016. Specific inclusion criteria were duration at least 1 week, report of effects on SBP or DBP or both and comparison of inorganic nitrate or beetroot juice supplementation with placebo control groups. Random-effects models were used to calculate the pooled BP effect sizes. RESULTS:: Thirteen trials met eligibility criteria. The trials included a total of 325 participants with seven to 65 participants per study. The duration of each intervention ranged from 1 to 6 weeks. Ten trials assessed BP in resting clinic conditions, whereas 24-h ambulatory and daily home monitorings were used in six and three trials, respectively. Overall, dietary nitrate was associated with a significant decline in SBP [−4.1?mmHg (95% confidence interval: −6.1, −2.2); P?


Steiner R.A.,King's College London | Tucker J.A.,Northumbria University
Acta Crystallographica Section D: Structural Biology | Year: 2017

A short introduction is provided to the concept of restraints in macromolecular crystallographic refinement. A typical ligand restraint-generation process is then described, covering types of input, the methodology and the mechanics behind the software in general terms, how this has evolved over recent years and what to look for in the output. Finally, the currently available restraint-generation software is compared, concluding with some thoughts for the future.An overview of the process of ligand restraint generation for macromolecular crystallographic refinement is given. © 2017 Steiner and Tucker.


Langton D.,Northumbria University
The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume | Year: 2017

BACKGROUND: Large-diameter (≥36-mm) metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip replacements have been shown to fail at an unacceptably high rate. Globally, the DePuy Pinnacle prosthesis was the most widely used device of this type. There is evidence to suggest that one of the main reasons for the poor clinical performance of large-diameter MoM prostheses is the metal debris released from the head-stem taper junction-i.e., taper junction failure. The aim of this study was to investigate variation in the as-manufactured finish of the female taper surface and to determine its influence on material loss. We hypothesized that rougher surfaces with higher relative material peaks would be significantly associated with greater taper wear rates.METHODS: We analyzed 93 Articul/eze femoral head tapers with a 36-mm bearing diameter that had been used in combination with a Corail titanium uncemented stem. The influence of the surface topography of the as-manufactured female taper surface on taper wear was examined by means of a multiple regression model, taking into account other known variables.RESULTS: We identified great variation in the as-manufactured surface finish of the female taper surface, with a range of measured Ra values from 0.14 to 4.20 μm. The roughness of the female taper surface appeared to be the most important variable associated with taper wear (p < 0.001). The best-fitting regression model, including duration in vivo, head offset, reduced peak height (Rpk) value, stem shaft angle, and bearing surface wear rate, explained approximately 44% of the variation in taper wear rates.CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the roughness of the female taper surface appears to be a significant factor in metal debris release from head-stem taper junctions.CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study shows evidence that previously unappreciated variations in manufacturing processes may have a major impact on the clinical outcomes of patients.


Bateson M.,Northumbria University | Nettle D.,Northumbria University
Aging Cell | Year: 2017

Longitudinal studies of human leucocyte telomere length often report a percentage of individuals whose telomeres appear to lengthen. However, based on theoretical considerations and empirical data, Steenstrup et al. (Nucleic Acids Research, 2013, vol 41(13): e131) concluded that this lengthening is unlikely to be a real biological phenomenon and is more likely to be an artefact of measurement error. We dispute the logic underlying this claim. We argue that Steenstrup et al.'s analysis is incomplete because it failed to compare predictions derived from assuming a scenario with no true telomere lengthening with alternative scenarios in which true lengthening occurs. To address this deficit, we built a computational model of telomere dynamics that allowed us to compare the predicted percentage of observed telomere length gainers given differing assumptions about measurement error and the true underling dynamics. We modelled a set of scenarios, all assuming measurement error, but both with and without true telomere lengthening. We found a range of scenarios assuming some true telomere lengthening that yielded either similar or better quantitative fits to the empirical data on the percentage of individuals showing apparent telomere lengthening. We conclude that although measurement error contributes to the prevalence of apparent telomere lengthening, Steenstrup et al.'s conclusion was too strong, and current data do not allow us to reject the hypothesis that true telomere lengthening is a real biological phenomenon in epidemiological studies. Our analyses highlight the need for process-level models in the analysis of telomere dynamics. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

With Cassini making final preparations to penetrate Saturn's rings, and renewed interest in colonising the Moon and sending people to Mars, space flight and exploration are experiencing a level of interest not seen since the Apollo missions to the Moon in the late 60's and 70's, and the space shuttle programme of the 80's. Space travel and exploration have resulted in a variety of technological developments which have benefitted life on Earth - but could the experiences of humans in space also have impact on our understanding of terrestrial human health? Scientists at the University of Plymouth and Northumbria University, Newcastle, are helping to write the medical rulebook that will keep astronauts fit and healthy during long trips through the solar system. While working at the European Astronaut Centre (EAC), in Germany, Northumbria's Dr Andrew Winnard realised there was very little evidence housed under one roof on what changes we expect to occur in astronauts during spaceflight - and what interventions work best to try and prevent these changes. Andrew also noticed that there was no systematic review group for the entire aerospace medicine field, like there are for almost all other areas of medicine. He recommended a systematic review group for aerospace medicine, to look at the effectiveness of interventions to prevent health and fitness changes among astronauts and military and civil aviators that will facilitate reviews to inform operational medical guidelines and decision-making processes. He enlisted the support of systematic review expert, co-convener of the Cochrane Priority Settings Method Group and qualified pilot, Dr Mona Nasser from the University of Plymouth, to help formulate the group. As well as benefiting astronauts and those working in space, the learning will also be used to inform medical practice on Earth; such as in the treatment of lower back pain. Northumbria is working with experts from the University of Plymouth, the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the Royal Air Force (RAF) the International Space University and Blue Abyss - the world's largest research, training and development pool for marine and aerospace - to launch this review group at an aerospace medicine conference in the US in May 2017. The group are also launching their website at the Aerospace Medical Association 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting in Denver, between April 29- and May 4 2017. The Aerospace Medicine Systematic Review Group will facilitate pooling of studies done in aerospace medicine under one roof and ensure that results of reviews are used to feed into comprehensive guidelines that will feed into major operational decisions. Dr Winnard, Lecturer in Clinical/Musculoskeletal Biomechanics at Northumbria University and Coordinator of the UK Space Environments Association, said: "The group is developing and publishing methods that can be used by anyone undertaking aerospace systematic reviews. These tools help researchers understand and assess what is good quality aerospace research. For example, one tool already developed and available freely online (at our website) helps researchers determine the quality of bed rest studies often used to similar spaceflight for research. "Already the ESA is hoping the group can help lead reviews to answer questions such as, what exercises will work in small spacecraft on missions that return to the moon, compared to on the International Space Station (ISS) and also asking how the medical challenges will be different on the moon compared to what we are familiar with on ISS." Dr Mona Nasser from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry added: "Systematic reviews are vital to helping clinicians, researchers and the public make sense of published research. Research evidence needs to be considered in the context of evidence which has gone before in the form of a systematic review. Only by looking at the full picture in a systematic manner can we hope to glean a glimmer of understanding. By bringing the discipline of the systematic review to research around aerospace medicine, we believe we can help aerospace clinicians make the most of the research available to improve their practices and benefit their patients. That this can be translated to 'Earth-bound' medicine is also exciting." Northumbria University has already worked with ESA and international collaborators including astronauts to conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of exercise to protect the lower spine and pelvis from changes that happen in space. The review found no current researched exercises are fully effective at preventing these changes so post flight rehab is needed. Northumbria is now developing the 'Functional Re-adaptive Exercise Device', known as FRED, which has been created to combat the back problems astronauts suffer when they return to earth. The device can also be used by those that have developed back pain on Earth. Former NASA Astronaut Dan Barry said: "As more people go into space and as space exploration expands beyond low earth orbit, effective countermeasures to low gravity environments become even more essential for crew health and mission success. "Existing literature on space health topics is widely scattered and of highly variable quality. A dedicated systematic aerospace medicine review group is important to provide a consistent, high quality assessment of findings that will lead to improved medical decisions." Wing Commander Pete Hodkinson, Consultant in Aviation and Space Medicine for the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine added: "Aerospace medicine like all other areas of medicine is striving to improve the evidence base to its practice. The establishment of an aerospace medicine systematic review group is a great step towards more evidence based practice in this field; it is warmly welcomed and strongly supported by the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine."


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: phys.org

Space travel and exploration have resulted in a variety of technological developments which have benefitted life on Earth - but could the experiences of humans in space also have impact on our understanding of terrestrial human health? Scientists at the University of Plymouth and Northumbria University, Newcastle, are helping to write the medical rulebook that will keep astronauts fit and healthy during long trips through the solar system. While working at the European Astronaut Centre (EAC), in Germany, Northumbria's Dr Andrew Winnard realised there was very little evidence housed under one roof on what changes we expect to occur in astronauts during spaceflight - and what interventions work best to try and prevent these changes. Andrew also noticed that there was no systematic review group for the entire aerospace medicine field, like there are for almost all other areas of medicine. He recommended a systematic review group for aerospace medicine, to look at the effectiveness of interventions to prevent health and fitness changes among astronauts and military and civil aviators that will facilitate reviews to inform operational medical guidelines and decision-making processes. He enlisted the support of systematic review expert, co-convener of the Cochrane Priority Settings Method Group and qualified pilot, Dr Mona Nasser from the University of Plymouth, to help formulate the group. As well as benefiting astronauts and those working in space, the learning will also be used to inform medical practice on Earth; such as in the treatment of lower back pain. Northumbria is working with experts from the University of Plymouth, the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the Royal Air Force (RAF) the International Space University and Blue Abyss - the world's largest research, training and development pool for marine and aerospace - to launch this review group at an aerospace medicine conference in the US in May 2017. The group are also launching their website at the Aerospace Medical Association 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting in Denver, between April 29- and May 4 2017. The Aerospace Medicine Systematic Review Group will facilitate pooling of studies done in aerospace medicine under one roof and ensure that results of reviews are used to feed into comprehensive guidelines that will feed into major operational decisions. Dr Winnard, Lecturer in Clinical/Musculoskeletal Biomechanics at Northumbria University and Coordinator of the UK Space Environments Association, said: "The group is developing and publishing methods that can be used by anyone undertaking aerospace systematic reviews. These tools help researchers understand and assess what is good quality aerospace research. For example, one tool already developed and available freely online (at our website) helps researchers determine the quality of bed rest studies often used to similar spaceflight for research. "Already the ESA is hoping the group can help lead reviews to answer questions such as, what exercises will work in small spacecraft on missions that return to the moon, compared to on the International Space Station (ISS) and also asking how the medical challenges will be different on the moon compared to what we are familiar with on ISS." Dr Mona Nasser from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry added: "Systematic reviews are vital to helping clinicians, researchers and the public make sense of published research. Research evidence needs to be considered in the context of evidence which has gone before in the form of a systematic review. Only by looking at the full picture in a systematic manner can we hope to glean a glimmer of understanding. By bringing the discipline of the systematic review to research around aerospace medicine, we believe we can help aerospace clinicians make the most of the research available to improve their practices and benefit their patients. That this can be translated to 'Earth-bound' medicine is also exciting." Northumbria University has already worked with ESA and international collaborators including astronauts to conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of exercise to protect the lower spine and pelvis from changes that happen in space. The review found no current researched exercises are fully effective at preventing these changes so post flight rehab is needed. Northumbria is now developing the 'Functional Re-adaptive Exercise Device', known as FRED, which has been created to combat the back problems astronauts suffer when they return to earth. The device can also be used by those that have developed back pain on Earth. Former NASA Astronaut Dan Barry said: "As more people go into space and as space exploration expands beyond low earth orbit, effective countermeasures to low gravity environments become even more essential for crew health and mission success. "Existing literature on space health topics is widely scattered and of highly variable quality. A dedicated systematic aerospace medicine review group is important to provide a consistent, high quality assessment of findings that will lead to improved medical decisions." Wing Commander Pete Hodkinson, Consultant in Aviation and Space Medicine for the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine added: "Aerospace medicine like all other areas of medicine is striving to improve the evidence base to its practice. The establishment of an aerospace medicine systematic review group is a great step towards more evidence based practice in this field; it is warmly welcomed and strongly supported by the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine." Explore further: European space agency to help NASA take humans beyond moon


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

With Cassini making final preparations to penetrate Saturn's rings, and renewed interest in colonizing the Moon and sending people to Mars, space flight and exploration are experiencing a level of interest not seen since the Apollo missions to the Moon in the late 60's and 70's, and the space shuttle program of the 80's. Space travel and exploration have resulted in a variety of technological developments that have benefitted life on Earth - but could the experiences of humans in space also have impact on our understanding of terrestrial human health? Scientists at the University of Plymouth and Northumbria University, Newcastle, are helping to write the medical rulebook that will keep astronauts fit and healthy during long trips through the solar system. While working at the European Astronaut Centre (EAC), in Germany, Northumbria's Andrew Winnard realized there was very little evidence housed under one roof about what changes we expect to occur in astronauts during spaceflight, and what interventions work best to try and prevent these changes. Winnard also noticed that there was no systematic review group for the entire aerospace medicine field, like there are for almost all other areas of medicine. He recommended a systematic review group for aerospace medicine to look at the effectiveness of interventions to prevent health and fitness changes among astronauts and military and civil aviators that will facilitate reviews to inform operational medical guidelines and decision-making processes. He enlisted the support of systematic review expert, co-convener of the Cochrane Priority Settings Method Group and qualified pilot, Mona Nasser from the University of Plymouth, to help formulate the group. As well as benefiting astronauts and those working in space, the learning will also be used to inform medical practice on Earth, such as in the treatment of lower back pain. Northumbria is working with experts from the University of Plymouth, the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the Royal Air Force (RAF) the International Space University and Blue Abyss - the world's largest research, training and development pool for marine and aerospace - to launch this review group at an aerospace medicine conference in the U.S. in May 2017. The group are also launching their website at the Aerospace Medical Association 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting in Denver, between April 29- and May 4 2017. The Aerospace Medicine Systematic Review Group will facilitate pooling of studies done in aerospace medicine under one roof and ensure that results of reviews are used to feed into comprehensive guidelines that will feed into major operational decisions. "The group is developing and publishing methods that can be used by anyone undertaking aerospace systematic reviews. These tools help researchers understand and assess what is good quality aerospace research. For example, one tool already developed and available freely online (at our website) helps researchers determine the quality of bed rest studies often used to similar spaceflight for research," Winnard said. "Already the ESA is hoping the group can help lead reviews to answer questions such as, what exercises will work in small spacecraft on missions that return to the moon, compared to on the International Space Station (ISS) and also asking how the medical challenges will be different on the moon compared to what we are familiar with on ISS." "Systematic reviews are vital to helping clinicians, researchers and the public make sense of published research. Research evidence needs to be considered in the context of evidence which has gone before in the form of a systematic review. Only by looking at the full picture in a systematic manner can we hope to glean a glimmer of understanding. By bringing the discipline of the systematic review to research around aerospace medicine, we believe we can help aerospace clinicians make the most of the research available to improve their practices and benefit their patients. That this can be translated to 'Earth-bound' medicine is also exciting," Nasser added. Northumbria University has already worked with ESA and international collaborators including astronauts to conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of exercise to protect the lower spine and pelvis from changes that happen in space. The review found no current researched exercises are fully effective at preventing these changes so post flight rehab is needed. Northumbria is now developing the "Functional Re-adaptive Exercise Device," known as FRED, which has been created to combat the back problems astronauts suffer when they return to earth. The device can also be used by those that have developed back pain on Earth. "As more people go into space and as space exploration expands beyond low earth orbit, effective countermeasures to low gravity environments become even more essential for crew health and mission success," Former NASA Astronaut Dan Barry said. "Existing literature on space health topics is widely scattered and of highly variable quality. A dedicated systematic aerospace medicine review group is important to provide a consistent, high quality assessment of findings that will lead to improved medical decisions." "Aerospace medicine like all other areas of medicine is striving to improve the evidence base to its practice. The establishment of an aerospace medicine systematic review group is a great step toward more evidence based practice in this field; it is warmly welcomed and strongly supported by the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine," added Wing Commander Pete Hodkinson, Consultant in Aviation and Space Medicine for the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

According to Glasgow and HSE/Northumbria researchers, repetition of non-verbs as well as verbs can boost the effect of syntactic priming, i.e. the likelihood of people reproducing the structure of the utterance they have just heard. The way the human brain works makes people prone to repeating the syntactic structures they have recently heard or uttered. In psycholinguistics, this phenomenon is called the syntactic priming effect. Until recently, it was believed that repetition of verbs in particular could enhance this effect. University of Glasgow researchers Christoph Scheepers and Claudine Raffray, in collaboration with Andriy Myachykov (representing HSE and Northumbria University), have shown in their experiments that this is not necessarily true, and that repetition of other parts of speech, not only verbs, can influence the magnitude of the syntactic priming effect. Their findings are published in the Journal of Memory and Language in the article "The lexical boost effect is not diagnostic of lexically-specific syntactic representations". The priming effect, i.e. people's ability to unconsciously reproduce prior experience - something that they have seen, heard, etc. - is well documented in psychology. Priming can manifest itself in simple things, such as the unconscious repetition of gestures, intonations or body poses of others, and in more complex behavioural patterns. This happens because perceptions tend to 'warm up' the brain, preparing it for similar experiences. For example, someone who has just spent an hour solving mathematical problems can handle another mathematical problem faster than someone who has been cooking or reading War and Peace. Classical priming studies have often focused on basic elements of perception, such as processing similar visual stimuli. Having seen a round pizza image, a subject will react faster to a coin image, because it has a similar shape. Yet at a deeper level, the same effect manifests itself in the perception and reproduction of content and meaning. "People tend to repeat their own and others' behaviour. It is the foundation of priming. This effect, according to the interactive alignment theory, is more than just experimental curiosity or the reflection of very primitive behavioural patterns. In fact, it is an important subconscious mechanism that underlies children's linguistic and broader cognitive development, allowing us to signal to each other that 'we are of the same blood' and helps reduce everyone's cognitive burden, since people no longer need to control their every word and gesture and invent something new all the time," the researches explain. Verbal or linguistic priming, i.e. the tendency to reproduce one's own or other person's linguistic patterns at different levels - lexical (words), semantic (meanings) and syntactic (sentence structures) - is the main theme of the study. The syntactic priming effect was first demonstrated in the 1980s. It was shown, for example, that after reading a sentence with a certain syntactic structure, a person will perceive and process the next sentence with a similar structure much faster and will be more likely to repeat the syntactic frame of the sentence just heard. Scheepers, Raffray, and Myachykov offer the following example of syntactic priming. "Imagine someone describing an event in which a girl handed a ball to a boy. This event can be described in more than one way. One can say, 'the girl gave the boy a ball' or 'the girl gave a ball to the boy'. Let's say the person you are talking to uses the first option, 'the girl gave the boy a ball'. Let's call this sentence a prime. Let's assume that now you need to describe an event to the other person, in which an artist shows an easel to a child. Let's call this sentence a target. It turns out that you are more likely to say, 'the artist showed the child an easel' than 'the artist showed an easel to the child', repeating the syntactic structure of the prime. While, of course, it does not work every time, the tendency to repeat a syntactic structure from one utterance to the next is real and forms the basis of syntactic priming." It was initially assumed that the syntactic priming effect is autonomous and not subject to external influences, such as the repetition of words or their meanings between prime and target. Then, in the late nineties, papers began to appear showing a 'lexically boosted' syntactic priming effect. Specifically, it was shown that if prime and target utterances both contain the verb give, the likelihood of re-using the syntactic structure of the prime in the target increases even more than if the prime contains the verb give and the target the verb show. Curiously, the question of whether repeated nouns could produce comparable lexical boosts to structural priming had been largely ignored in past research. "Indeed, our research reveals that repetition of any content word of a sentence - noun or verb - can boost the syntactic priming effect, and that the more words are repeated, the stronger syntactic priming turns out to be," say the authors. In the target trials of their experiments, subjects were asked to produce sentences from randomly arranged words on screen; these target trials were preceded by prime trials in which subjects had to read out complete sentences. Across conditions, the authors systematically varied the numbers and types of content words shared between the primes and the targets. These findings are of academic significance in the context of the theory of syntax and simple sentence theories. "While there is consensus that the verb plays a pivotal role in determining the syntactic structure of a sentence, our research shows that the lexical boost to syntactic priming is not bound to repetition of verbs," the researchers explain, adding "Contrary to previously held views, the lexical boost effect is not a very good diagnostic of lexicalised syntax."


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Giving your partner a massage can improve both their wellbeing and yours. That is the key finding of research by Sayuri Naruse and Dr Mark Moss from Northumbria University that is being presented today, Thursday 4 May 2017, at the British Psychological Society's Annual Conference in Brighton. "The benefits of receiving a massage from a professional are well documented, but this research shows how a similar outcome can be obtained by couples with little prior training and experience of the activity." A total of 38 participants completed a three-week massage course, assessing their wellbeing via questionnaires before and after massage sessions across eight areas of physical and mental wellbeing, stress, coping and relationship satisfaction. The couples' wellbeing, perceived stress and coping was positively impacted by the massage course, with none of these effects having significantly decreased at a follow up three weeks after the end of the reporting period. Couples also found that their physical and emotional wellbeing had significantly improved following the completion of each massage session. Crucially, this was equally apparent whether the participant was giving or receiving the massage. Of the couples who took part in the study, 91 per cent said that they would recommend mutual massage to their friends and family. With past research having shown that couples tend to operate as a pair when coping with stress, giving each other a massage may also help to ensure relationship stability. "These findings show that massage can be a simple and effective way for couples to improve their physical and mental wellbeing whilst showing affection for one another. "Our data also suggests that these positive effects of a short massage course may be long lasting, as is reflected in 74 per cent of the sample continuing to use massage after the course had finished. "Massage is a cost effective and pleasant intervention that isn't just for a therapeutic setting but can be easily incorporated into a healthy couple's daily routine." For further information BEFORE THE CONFERENCE contact the British Psychological Society Press Centre: 0116 252 9500 / 07773 173 510 or email presscentre@bps.org.uk DURING THE CONFERENCE (3 to 5 May) call the conference press office on: 07793 800 366 / 07773 173 510 or email presscentre@bps.org.uk Full poster/paper presentation title: 'To give is better than to receive? Couples Massage Significantly Benefits Both Partners Wellbeing' The British Psychological Society annual conference takes place from 3 to 5 May at the Hilton Brighton Metropole. For details of the programme visit http://www. The BPS is the representative body for psychology and psychologists in the UK. We are responsible for the development, promotion and application of psychology for the public good. For more information visit http://www. .


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Along with the usual desks and blackboards, primary school classrooms may soon be equipped with something a little less traditional – rosemary essential oil. According to a study recently conducted by a team from Northumbria University, the scent of the herb boosts children's working memory. Led by Dr. Mark Moss and Victoria Earle, the scientists administered a memory test to 40 children aged 10 to 11. Each child was randomly assigned to take that test either in a room in which rosemary essential oil had been diffused for 10 minutes, or in a room with no scent. They were tested individually, seated across a table from a researcher. When the results were tallied, it was found that children tested in the scented room received "significantly higher" scores. This was particularly true of tasks in which they had to recall words. Although the science behind the effect isn't entirely understood, it is believed that aromas may affect electrical activity in the brain, or that pharmacologically-active compounds might be absorbed via exposure to odors. A previous study conducted by the same group concluded that rosemary essential oil aroma could boost cognition in healthy adults. According to Moss, however, the phenomenon may be particularly beneficial to school-age children. "We do know that poor working memory is related to poor academic performance and these findings offers a possible cost-effective and simple intervention to improve academic performance in children," he says. A paper on the research is being presented this Thursday at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference in Brighton, UK.


Gilbert H.J.,Northumbria University | Knox J.P.,University of Leeds | Boraston A.B.,University of Victoria
Current Opinion in Structural Biology | Year: 2013

Plant cell walls are complex configurations of polysaccharides that are recalcitrant to degradation. The enzymes deployed by microbes to degrade these materials comprise glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases and polysaccharide oxidases. Non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are found as discretely folded units within the multi-modular structures of these enzymes where they play critical roles in the recognition of plant cell wall components and potentiating the activity of the enzymes. Here we propose a refinement to the Types A, B, and C classification of CBMs whereby the Type A CBMs remain those that bind the surfaces of crystalline polysaccharides but the Type B CBMs are redefined as those that bind internally on glycan chains ( endo-type), CBMs that bind to the termini of glycan chains are defined as Type C modules ( exo-type). In this context, we discuss recent advances, primarily driven by structural studies, which reveal the molecular modes of CBM-sugar interactions and how this specifically underpins and influences the biological function of CBMs in cell wall recognition and degradation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.23M | Year: 2012

Novel transplant regimens are currently being developed to improve beneficial GvL effects and reduce GvHD and infections via several new forms of cellular therapies. This newly emerging supra-disciplinary field of cellular therapy and regenerative medicine is also being used to improve outcomes in autoimmune disease (such as Rheumatoid Arthritis) and cancers. The goal of this research programme is to gain insight into the mechanisms of action of GvL and GvHD in order to improve current therapies and develop and test novel ones via clinical trials and/or animal model experiments. The research is therefore necessarily multidisciplinary including clinical medicine, immunology, genomics, proteomics, molecular biology and pathology. In order to implement cellular therapies across Europe the current EU Directive 2001/83/EC applies. These regulations stipulate that the cellular therapies which are advanced therapeutic medical products (ATMP) must be produced under current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Not only is there a lack of understanding of GvL vs. GvHD effects but there is also a lack of training in cGMP for both clinical and non-clinical scientists. We aim to re-address these basic current needs, as well as those of industry, which include lack of access to clinical tissue for validation of bio-markers prior to commercialisation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.90M | Year: 2016

The Arctic plays a key role in the Earths climate system and is an area of growing strategic importance for European policy. In this ETN, we will train the next generation of Arctic microbiology and biogeochemistry experts who, through their unique understanding of the Arctic environment and the factors that impact ecosystem and organism response to the warming Arctic, will be able to respond to the need for leadership from public, policy and commercial interests. The training and research programme of MicroArctic is made up of seven interlinked Work Packages (WP). WP1 to WP4 are research work packages at the cutting edge of Arctic microbiology and biogeochemistry and these will be supported by three overarching WPs (WP5-7) associated with the management, training and dissemination of results. WP1 will deliver information about the role of external inputs (e.g., atmospheric) of nutrients and microorganism that drive biogeochemical processes in relation to annual variation in Arctic microbial activity and biogeochemical processes. WP2 will explore ecosystem response on time scales of 100s of years to these inputs using a chrnosequence approach in the already changing Arctic. The effect of time and season and the warming of the Arctic on ecosystem functioning and natural resources will be quantified through geochemical analyses and next generation multi-omics approaches. Complementing WP1 and WP2, WP3 will focus on organism response and adaptation using a range of biochemical, molecular, experimental and culturing approaches. WP4 will address specific applied issues such as colonisation by pathogenic organisms and biotechnological exploitation of Arctic ecosystems. MicroArctic will bring together interdisciplinary experts from both the academic and non-academic sectors across Europe into a network of 20 Institutions across 11 countries.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-3.2-1 | Award Amount: 16.82M | Year: 2009

The ultimate ambition of COPIRIDE is to develop a new modular production and factory concept for the chemical industry using adaptable plants with flexible output. This concept will be superior, intellectual property (IP) protected, and enable a much wider spread of know-how and education of this skill-intensive technology. Key functional enabling units are new production-scale, mass-manufactured microstructured reactors as well as other integrated process intensification (PI) reactors realising integrated processes. This will lead to a substantial reduction in costs, resources & energy and notably improves the eco-efficiency. To ensure the competitiveness of European (EU) manufacturing businesses, PI technology / know-how is transferred from leaders to countries (and respective medium & small industries) with no exposure in PI so far, but with a track record in sustainability, and to the explorative markets food and biofuels. A deeply rooted base will be created for IP rights (Copyright, = COPIRIDE) by generic modular reactor & plant design and new generic processes via Novel Process Windows, facilitating patent filing. Due to the entire modular plant concept comprising all utilities far beyond the reaction & processual parts - a holistic PI concept is provided, covering the whole development cycle with, e.g., safety & process control & plant approval. Features, inter alia, are fast plant start-up and shut-down for multipurpose functionality (flexibility in products), sustainable & safe production, and fast transfer from lab to production & business (time-to-market). Industrial demonstration activities up to production scale with five field trials present a good cross-section of reactions relevant to the EU chemical industry. The economic impact in COPIRIDE is 10 Mio /a (cautiously optimistic) to 30 Mio /a (optimistic) by direct exploitation. Indirect exploitation might sum up to 800 Mio /a (very optimistic) by other companies via technology transfer.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.4-5 | Award Amount: 1.96M | Year: 2009

FUTURAGE aims to produce the definitive road map that will guide European research on ageing and health for the next 10-15 years. It represents plans for the most extensive consultation ever conducted in this field and for the mobilisation of not only the leading scientists but also the stakeholders that will determine the fate of the road map. FUTURAGE combines all of the major coordination actions in the ageing field, including an ERA-Net and, on this basis, promises to produce the most comprehensive formally grounded and scientifically credible road map, as well as one that commands wide support. FUTURAGE represents a unique set of partnerships among leading scientists and between scientists and key stakeholders. It builds on and extends the existing ERA-AGE collaboration (12 existing partners) by (i) combining all of the key coordination actions and specific support actions on ageing of the past decade including: FORUM, ERA-AGE LINK-AGE and AGEACTION, (ii) extending the collaboration to new Member States, (iii) integrating scientists and programme managers, (iv) emphasising knowledge translation and policy impact and (v) engaging all key stakeholders. The resulting roadmap will not only represent the state-of-the-art in scientific terms but will also reflect the needs of a wide range of research users including funders, industry, policy makers, practitioners and older people.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: HEALTH.2013.4.1-4 | Award Amount: 553.89K | Year: 2013

The landscape of genetic testing is rapidly changing. Soon, whole genome sequence analysis (3Gb-testing) will be an effective and financially viable alternative to targeted gene analysis. New technologies that allow efficient sequencing of a whole human genome in a diagnostic setting will have an enormous impact on diagnostic centres replacing many existing molecular and cytogenetic tests. Patients deserve to benefit from our vastly growing knowledge on functional genomics. 3Gb-testing is the ideal method to bring these benefits to the public. However, it is critical to avoid mistakes with respect to ethics, quality, over or mis-interpretation of data. It is essential that our society is prepared for the change once it is implemented. Hence, current gaps in our knowledge have to be identified and research has to be initiated to bridge these gaps. The 3Gb-TEST project will bring stakeholders together and ensure they are informed with respect to the desirable and undesirable developments. The clinical utility and cost effectiveness of whole genome sequencing needs to be determined as part of a robust health technology assessment process (HTA). Interpretation of sequence data in terms of clinical relevance will pose a challenge to both laboratory and clinical geneticists. Substantial investments may be required and the logistic restructuring of genetic services will need to be addressed. This project aims to prepare Europe for innovations in molecular testing. Quality assessment schemes, HTA and guidelines have to be in place. Healthcare professionals must be aware of the impending change and potential impact on practice. The Consortium will inform the healthcare community and make recommendations to the European Commission, the European Society of Human Genetics, and national organizations relevant to this field. A key output will be a validated roadmap for the implementation of diagnostic genome sequencing in Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.4-03 | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2012

Guaranteeing the long term availability of safe foods is a global concern that has initiated a large number of activities, including research, policy development and implementation, legislation and training. Extensive information is generated about food safety, but it is fragmented, and not internationally disseminated. The Collab4Safety consortium will establish a global network on food safety with the aim of developing a sustainable coordination platform for exchange of food safety information about research findings, capacity building and policies and facilitate the control and mitigation of existing and emerging food risks. Tried and tested methods will be used to identify problems and gaps in knowledge, resulting in generation of outputs valuable to research managers and interested stakeholders globally. Establishing a permanent structure will contribute to the development of trust between key players and institutions, which is needed to create an international forum for exchange of information and opinions on matters pertaining to food safety in the food and feed chain


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: SSH.2012.2.1-2 | Award Amount: 1.33M | Year: 2013

DESAFIO means challenge in both Portuguese and Spanish. The guiding concept of our proposal is to make a contribution towards tackling what is arguably one of the major challenges facing Brazil and Latin American countries in the 21st century: eradicating structural social inequality in the access to essential water and sanitation services. The overarching objective of our proposal is assessing existing experiences and developing new strategies that bring about sustainable, appropriate, and innovative socio-technical solutions to foster economic and social development through social transformation in vulnerable communities, particularly with reference to access to safe water supply and sanitation in urban, peri-urban, and rural areas of South America, with a particular emphasis on Brazil. These strategies will be developed through research and networking that actively engages beneficiary communities, practitioners, local authorities, and other relevant actors in their planning, design, assessment, implementation, monitoring, validation, and diffusion. Our transdisciplinary approach is predicated on a close interaction with non-academic actors in the production and validation of knowledge, among other things to underpin policy and behavioural transformations. We have selected a number of case studies that will cover a range of situations and characteristics, from informal settlements in the urban periphery of world megacities (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) and in peri-urban areas of provincial capitals (Cali, Colombia), favelas located in the heart of booming mid-range urban centres (Recife, Brazil), to small rural villages (Mondomo, Colombia) and communities in semi-arid areas (Cear and Minas Gerais, Brazil and Santa Fe, Argentina). We will endeavour to draw lessons and develop recommendations that are applicable to other socio-cultural and economic contexts across the developing world.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2014 | Award Amount: 1.04M | Year: 2015

The objective of the Cultural Narratives of Crisis and Renewal project is to examine cultural production and cultural practices in periods of societal crisis at the turn-of the 20th Century on both sides of the Atlantic. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate the role of cultural production, not just as a vehicle to elaborate cohesive narratives in moments of crisis, but as a space to create alternative imaginaries for social renewal. We need to explore the changing nature of our societies and the reconfiguration of regional and/or national cultural landscapes into globalized real (and virtual) spaces that erode the cultural frontiers of the nation-state. The project aims to address the scarcity of scientific research on cultural narratives elaborated around conjunctures of crisis and renewal, from the 1970s transition to neoliberalism in Latin America, to the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis in Spain. The analysis of cultural narratives and production in periods of societal crisis will lead us to identify underlying sets of values, beliefs, and practices: the way people think and act; who those people are and why they operate in a given cultural set (Cardoso and Jacobetty 2012). The programme will bring together researchers specialized in Hispanic and Latin American culture from 4 universities in Europe (Newcastle University (UNEW), Amsterdam University (UVA), Universitat de Valncia (UV) and Universitat de Lleida (UDL)) and 4 universities in Latin America (Universidad Austral de Chile (UACH), Pontificia Universidad Catlica del Per (PUCP), Universidad Nacional de Crdoba (UNC: Argentina), and Universidad Nacional Tres de Febrero (UNTREF: Argentina)). The project will support international networking, high quality academic publications (including at least 3 edited volumes, and 6 collaborative articles in international peer-reviewed journals), and knowledge transfer through research and training events, conferences, and exhibitions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-26-2014 | Award Amount: 4.95M | Year: 2015

Most adults who try to lose weight fail to maintain it. Obesity is a key economic and healthcare challenge for Europe. Effective interventions and commercial programmes for weight loss are widely available, but most people re-gain their lost weight. Currently few comprehensive solutions exist to help Europeans manage weight loss maintenance (WLM). Current research suggests the most promising evidence-based behaviour change techniques for WLM are self-monitoring, goal setting, action control, building self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Recent research also suggests that stress management and emotion regulation skills are key enablers of relapse prevention and weight-regain. Information technology offers attractive tools for teaching and supporting these techniques, some of which are currently delivered through resource-intensive face-to-face therapies. ICT-delivery includes networked-wireless tracking technologies, weighing-scales and activity sensors, online tools and smart-phone apps, multi-media resources and internet-based support. A broad choice of tools is most likely to be acceptable to users, who can pick and choose their own preferred technologies. The NoHoW project tests whether ICT-based delivery of the most promising evidence-based behavior change techniques is effective for WLM. We will carry out a large-scale international 3-centre trial of information technology tools that implement the most up-to-date behavioural science research. This trial will establish the effectiveness of these ICT tools in supporting WLM, linked to studies of European consumer needs and behaviour. Impact: The project will directly feed results into development of new products and services from the UKs largest commercial weight-loss provider, Slimming World providing immediate benefit to 500,000\ consumers. Commercialisation of project results will provide much needed WLM services that promote health education and long-term weight management programmes.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: NMP-2008-4.0-7 | Award Amount: 5.30M | Year: 2009

Disabling foot and ankle pain is common; it impacts negatively on health related quality of life, and it is has major cost implications on health systems across Europe. Foot and ankle orthoses are an effective treatment for these conditions. However, the market is dominated by low cost mass produced products, craftsmanship built customised devices with delivery times >15 days, and a limited range of computer-aided design and manufactured products. The objective of the A-FOOTPRINT project is to develop novel foot and ankle orthoses which are personalised for shape and biomechanical function and can be ready for patient use within 48 hours. The goal is to achieve improved fit and comfort, functionality, aesthetic appeal and ease of use with better clinical and cost effectiveness over state-of-the-art products. Innovative CAD tools will be developed and combined with rapid manufacturing to create complete geometric design freedom. This will be coupled with step change advances in personalisation by developing individual patient data from gait analysis and medical images to inform the design process, aided by biomechanical simulation to optimise functionality such as joint stabilisation and pressure distribution. Rapid manufacturing techniques will be used to develop novel customised orthotic components such as living hinges, variable stiffness and fine resolution cushioning to enable better personalised function. Setting new industry standards, prototype devices will be evaluated by near pharmaceutical industry level controlled trials to further improve product knowledge. This highly integrated, multidisciplinary project will make a significant impact on the health-related quality of life and well-being of EU citizens. The Consortium comprises leading orthotic and enabling technology SMEs, clinical and academic research centres and large enterprise. The project will enable the SMEs to become international leaders with strong competitive advantages.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-11-2015 | Award Amount: 1.90M | Year: 2016

Traditional valorisation approaches focus on linear processes: from academia to society. In order to bring valorisation to a higher level, all relevant actors need to cooperate in an equal setting: co-creation. Co-creation transcends boundaries, but it does not happen naturally. Therefore, the ACCOMPLISSH consortium, consisting of 14 universities from 12 countries (representing all the sub disciplines in SSH), will actively involve the other partners from the so called Quadruple Helix (industry, governments and societal partners) within the project. The project has chosen an Open Innovation approach. The ACCOMPLISSH project (Accelerate co-creation by setting up a multi-actor platform for impact from Social Sciences and Humanities) will create a platform for dialogue where not only universities are involved. The dialogue platform is organised in such a way that academia, industry, governments and societal partners equally contribute in identifying barriers and enablers of co-creation. The results from both practice and the theory of co-creation form the basis of the valorisation concept and will be tested in the project in a quadruple helix setting. This concept will be tested and developed in such a way that it is transferable, scalable and customized for academia, industry, governments and societal partners in the whole of Europe. The impact profile of SSH research could be far stronger and more visible than it currently is. There are significant barriers to the valorisation of SSH research which still need to be understood in detail. In order to push the envelope within universities, we acknowledge that next to SSH researchers, the research support officers are key players in valorisation of SSH research. The project will identify all barriers and enablers of co-creation in order to develop an innovative valorisation concept, which will foster knowledge exchange within the quadruple helix and strengthens the position of SSH research.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 5.18M | Year: 2009

New and recent developments have revolutionized the prostate cancer research and clinical arenas, requiring the next generation scientists to have comprehensive knowledge and expertise in basic, clinical and applied research. PRO-NEST offers young researchers a European integrated, multi-disciplinary training programme to become an independent and all-round scientist and team leader in (prostate) cancer research. This network is driven by recognised and experienced scientists from 17 academic and industrial partners. The joint PRO-NEST research programme focuses on the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the initiation and progression of prostate cancer as well as on the development of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets, with the ultimate goal to improve the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and prevention of this major European health problem. The fellows will strongly contribute to this programme by their individual research projects that will be carried out in a high standard and collaborative scientific infrastructure under the supervision of experts in the field. In this way, they will become technical specialists in a dedicated area of cancer research. The scientific and complementary skills of the fellows will be expanded and deepened by secondments and by theoretical and practical network-wide training courses on basic and clinical aspects of prostate cancer, biomarkers, technology, valorisation, scientific writing and presentation, project management, communication skills and job application skills. In an international conference entitled The European prostate cancer research floor on stage organised at the end of PRO-NEST, the fellows are given the opportunity to present themselves to potential coming academic and industrial employers. The expertise, state of the art tools and technological skills provided by each of the partners are competitive at the world scale, and form the comprehensive basis of top-level research and training in PRO-NEST. The available support from professional organizations and the existing collaborations in large research consortia ensures the successful realization of the PRO-NEST goals.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2007.4.2.1.1. | Award Amount: 2.60M | Year: 2008

The proposed project will develop a method for scaling down the analysis of policy impacts on multifunctional land uses and on the economic activities. This method will rely on micro-simulation and multi-agents models, designed and validated at municipality level using input from stakeholders. The models will address the structural evolution of the populations (appearance, disappearance and change of agents) depending on the local conditions for applying the structural policies on a set of municipality case studies. We shall consider policies related to use of Structural Funds (SFs), Cohesion Fund (CF), Preaccession funds (PAFs) and EAFRD (respectively CAP). This project will include the following actions: - Review the EU structural policies, identify driving forces at EU, national and regional levels for multifunctional land use activities and provide baselines for the design of national and regional scenarios on multifunctional land use activities. - Interaction with stakeholders: pre-model engagement with stakeholders in terms of scenario design and formulating agent decision rules for agent-based models, on-model engagement with stakeholders mirroring agent-based models, and post-model engagement with stakeholders in terms of assessing model outputs. - Design and develop micro-simulation and multi-agents models, of local dynamics and of the impact of European structural policies at the municipality level. - Build a mapping between available data on municipalities and prototypical, contrasted evolutions of micro-simulation and agent based models. This will allow us to aggregate the results provided by these models at a regional level, on a set of regional case studies, and to compare these results with existing models at regional scale. - Investigate the potential of the approach to design a method that enhances the scope of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Sustainable Impact Assessment (SIA).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SST.2010.2.1-3. | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2012

The BESTFACT objective is to develop, disseminate and enhance the utilisation of best practices and innovations in freight logistics that contribute to meeting European transport policy objectives with regard to competitiveness and environmental impact. BESTFACT builds up on the work of BESTUFS, PROMIT and BESTLOG and integrates four interrelated areas of the key freight logistics challenges the European Union is confronted with and creates coherence with the key actions of the Freight Logistics Action Plan: urban freight, green corridors and co-modality, transport related environmental issues and eFreight. BESTFACT will establish a robust and replicable methodology for collecting and processing best practices. Best practice is understood as the combination of three dimensions: (1) the identification, evaluation and prioritising of relevant business cases. (2) the credible knowledge management of best practices and (3), the utilisation and implementation within existing or new industrial realities. The BESTFACT best practice methodology comprises a three-level approach that includes the set up of a comprehensive best practice inventory for which 160 cases will be analysed providing a general description. 60 in depth surveys will be made including a detailed analysis of the best practice cases. The development of best practices will be addressed in 5 best practice implementation actions stimulating modal shift on company or regional level, co-operation among stakeholders or the introduction of best practices into administrative procedures. Practical best practice handbooks as well as research and policy recommendations addressing new and additional policy tools will be provided. BESTFACT will organise 12 cluster workshops and 3 conferences. Furthermore, a comprehensive knowledge management will be established to enlarge the knowledge basis and simplifying access to best practice. BESTFACT will be a neutral and open platform for any interested party.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.06M | Year: 2013

We will provide the first-ever research training in the transdisciplinary area of Microbial Resource Management and Engineering (MRME) to develop new concepts and technologies to meet the imminent societal challenge of closing the Urban Water Cycle (UWC), the sustainable management of residual waters and the preparation and distribution of safe potable water. The network consists of 10 regional world-leading Network Partners (NP) from private and academic sectors in DK, BE, UK, PT, CH, SE, complemented by 8 associated partners. Transdisciplinary training of 13 ESR and one ER will span from (molecular) microbial ecology to environmental engineering. Each ESR develops a personal and professional development plan. Training elements include expert training through cutting-edge individualized research projects, cross-sectoral mentorships, private sector internships, and participation in Network-wide PhD schools. Schools alternate between professional and technical training. The ITN ends with a fellow-led international research symposium. A supervisory board tracks project implementation. The private sector is engaged at the highest level: 4 private partners are full NPs. The ITN will provide ESRs with transsectoral training and experience, and instill an aptitude for research valorization, to create opportunity for research careers in public and private sectors. This ITN is timely, significant, and unique, as scientific and technological advances create tremendous opportunities for MRME, training in this transdisciplinary area is essentially absent across EU, and the need for innovation in closing the UWC is pressing, as water resources dwindle, urban consumption grows, and existing infrastructure ages. The ITN will structure the European research area and strengthen ties between and within the academic and private partners across regions. Researchers will be trained at the highest level with job prospects across academic, private, and public sectors.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.82M | Year: 2013

The expanding diversification and specialization of knowledge and the growing complexity of contemporary research in translational research warrant the creation of cooperative multi-disciplinary networks including both basic and medically oriented expertise. This notion is especially true for Mitochondrial Medicine which aims at understanding the physiopathological mechanisms sharing the features of mitochondrial biology and represents an ideal platform for the training of young investigators who will develop a broad view of biomedical sciences working in such a multifaceted area of research. The project will create a network of 10 basic and translational laboratories (among which 2 SMEs) and 2 associated partners who will provide well established professional tools for training and dissemination. MEET will train 11 ESRs and 3 ERs supervised in their research by 15 mentors and by their collaborators. In addition, the 14 trainees will attend at least 1 advanced course in the genetic field, 1 complementary training course about public and private financial sources for R&D and Innovation projects and 1 or 2 selected technical workshops organized by the 10 partner laboratories. The cohesion of the research and teaching activities will be guaranteed by: monthly telematic meetings of, an international scientific Symposium specifically addressed to associations and foundations of patients and patients families in order to exchange the most up-to-date knowledge advances.By creating the critical mass of scientific excellence documented by the track records of the individual investigators, most of whom have worked together in the FP6 EUMITOCOMBAT project, MEET will combine the efforts of leading clinicians with those of more basic oriented groups and will have important implications for the comprehension and treatment of mitochondria-related pathologies


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IRSES | Award Amount: 451.50K | Year: 2012

This project will develop a joint networking and advanced research programme on critical issues of planning, management and urban heritage that will strengthen research partnerships between European and Chinese partners. This aim will be achieved by short and longer-term periods of staff exchanges and networking activities between the participants, each a prestigious research institution. In total 79 researchers will undertake 215 months of exchange. The ultimate goal of this project is to achieve more rapid progress in advancing current knowledge, both conceptually and in terms of practical strategies of management, of the challenges of managing heritage as part of a wider process of spatial planning in the very different contexts provided by Europe and China. Its focus is the role of heritage in continuity and change in the city and region. Urban areas are the critical sphere of investigation as it is cities and urban regions that are subject to the greatest pressures for change and transformation and conflict and potential complementarity with heritage protection most acute. Europe and China are, broadly speaking, polar examples of the rate of urban change. In Europe the pace of urban change, in part due to heritage designation, is often very slow and we maybe building up a heritage time-bomb. In China, by contrast, urban change is an astonishingly rapid process, with the risk of heritage erasure. Each of the participating organisations has expertise in these areas and each is a geographical location that presents rich empirical case studies to explore.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.0 | Award Amount: 2.94M | Year: 2010

The 2003 breakthrough discovery of a nanoscale optically active cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, made it possible for the first time, to genetically re-engineer neuron cells to be photosensitive. It became possible to stimulate or inhibit individual action potentials at will, without further chemical modification. The capabilities have been demonstrated in a number of recent high profile journals detailing optical-neural control from cell culture to primate models. The light-gated cation channels were discovered and first applied by European researchers. The photonics and optoelectronics sectors, which can provide new stimulation technologies to this field, are additionally, European strengths. Nevertheless, in recent years, the dominant research output in this area has shifted to well-funded US laboratories.\nThis proposal therefore aims to create a consortium to develop an array of ultra bright electronically controlled microLEDs which will provide a truly revolutionary tool for the neuroscience and neurotechnology community. The consortium consists of experts in the field who converge the many disciplines (optics, sophisticated LED fabrication, CMOS flip chip design and bonding, biophysics, molecular biology, neurophysiology) to bear on the complex, and crucial to neuroscience, problem of studying dendritic physiology and neural network dynamics. Advances in the techniques of this field will absolutely be required to further our understanding of brain function. The system we propose to develop will be powerful, sophisticated and at the same time, lead to a commercial spin-out that will provide them at relatively low cost. In the longer term, the tools we develop in this proposal will hasten our long term aims of developing an optogenetic retinal prosthesis.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SPIRE-08-2015 | Award Amount: 11.09M | Year: 2015

IbD will create a holistic platform for facilitating process intensification in processes in which solids are an intrinsic part, the cornerstone of which will be an intensified-by-design (IbD). The IbD approach is hinged on the use of robust data about a process to redesign, modify, adapt and alter that process in a continuous, intensified system, and will be the new paradigm in the intensification of processes based on statistical, analytical and risk management methodologies in the design, development and processing of high quality safe and tailored chemicals, pharmaceuticals, minerals, ceramics, etc. under intensified processes. The IbD Project will deliver the EU process industry with an affordable and comprehensive devices-and-processes design-platform endeavoured to facilitate process intensification (PI), which specially targets -but is not limited to- solid materials processing. Five PI industry case studies will be implemented in mining, ceramics, pharmaceutical, non-ferrous metals and chemical processes using the IbD approach and to validate the IbD methodologies, tools, PI modules, control and fouling remediation strategies and the ICT Platform itself for the industrial implementation of PI in processes involving solids. The Platform includes design modules for the commonest intensified reactors-Rotating fluidized beds, micro-structured reactor and spinning disk, among others, as well as a generic Module Builder -equipped with a set of both proprietary and third-parties design tools- for designs carried out on the basis of radically novel ideas. The IbD Platform output is basically a data set that comprises the intensified reactor design -ready to be built or assembled-, an optimised whole process design including the upstream/downstream intensified unit operations and their solids handling capability, as well as cleaning methods, etc. and the expected economic and environmental quantitative impacts.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.10.2 | Award Amount: 1.68M | Year: 2013

The EUBrazilCC project is a first step towards providing a user-centric, cross-Atlantic test bench for European & Brazilian research communities. EUBrazilCC is centred in practical scientific use cases, and it is built on a close collaboration among European & Brazilian excellence centres. EUBrazilCC will exploit & coordinate, in a 2 year project, existing heterogeneous e-Infrastructures (virtualized datacentres, supercomputers and opportunistic resources) with more than 5500 CPU and 17000 GPU cores.\nEUBrazilCC includes 3 multidisciplinary & highly complementary scenarios, covering Epidemiology, Health, Biodiversity, Natural Resources & Climate Change. All those scientific scenarios involve complex workflows & access to huge datasets. EUBrazilCC will leverage from the experience in Brazil & Europe for the federation of resources (JiT Cloud, OurGrid, CSGrid and InterCloud), programming environments & scientific gateways (mc2, COMPSs, eScienceCentral) & distributed scientific data access (parallel data analysis).\nFor the use cases, EUBrazilCC involves lead institutions, such as FIOCRUZ, world leader in Leishmaniasis; BSC, developer of the heart simulator Alya, which received an HPC Innovation Excellence Award; & CMCC, key node in the Earth System Grid Federation.\nEUBrazilCC defines a strong, networked dissemination to promote the infrastructure among new communities, leveraging from the networks of SINAPAD and Brazilian National Institutes of Science and Technology, LifeWatch-ESFRI & the European Network for Earth System Modelling.\nThe project incorporates a specific interoperability task involving Helix-Nebula initiative and EGI & it will exploit the opportunities in mobility for the cooperation among the partners, such as Science without borders. Finally, EUBrazilCC defines a focus on sustainability through dedicated tasks related to draw an exploitation plan for the platform & the 3 use cases whilst adhering to the adoption of international standards.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2011.1.2-2 | Award Amount: 11.03M | Year: 2012

The objective of the ALEXANDER project is the identification of novel strategies (e.g., proteolytic enzyme strategy, thiomer strategy, zeta potential changing systems, SNEDDS strategy) and the optimization of existing strategies (e.g., disulfide breaking strategy and slippery surface strategy) for the efficient transport of nanocarriers through the mucus gel layer (e.g., intestinal, nasal, ocular, vaginal, buccal, pulmonary). In particular, R&D activities will be focused on the synthesis of functionalized nanocarriers capable of permeating the mucus gel layer and delivering their therapeutic payload to the epithelium. The nanocarriers will be characterized with respect to their physicochemical properties, ability to cross the mucus gel layer, in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity. The potential of the developed nanocarriers as delivery systems for mucosal administration of macromolecules will be demonstrated via the oral delivery of peptides, oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides and the nasal delivery of a plasmid encoding for an antigen.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SST.2008.1.1.9. | Award Amount: 3.45M | Year: 2010

The purpose of SuperGreen is to promote the development of European freight logistics in an environmentally friendly manner. Environmental factors play an increasing role in all transport modes, and holistic approaches are needed to identify win-win solutions. SuperGreen will evaluate a series of green corridors covering some representative regions and main transport routes throughout Europe. The selected corridors will be benchmarked based on parameters and key performance indicators covering all aspects related to transport operations and infrastructure. Environmental issues and emissions, external-, infrastructure- and internal costs will be covered to get an overall and realistic picture. Based on this benchmarking, areas and candidates for improvement will be identified (i.e. bottlenecks). The next step will be to evaluate how green technologies may support improving the identified bottlenecks. Among the green technologies considered may be novel propulsion systems, alternative fuels, cargo handling technologies, new terminal technologies or novel concepts relevant for the multimodal green corridors. The benchmarking issue is an iterative process. Next, a similar process needs to be accomplished taking into consideration smarter utilisation of available information in the multimodal chain (ICT-flows). An analysis will be made on how this information can be utilised to achieve greener logistics along the green corridors (e.g. e-freight, Supply Chain Management (SCM), smarter planning, scheduling and tracking & tracing). Based on these iterative benchmarks and evaluations, new R&D within specific topics may be needed to improve the identified bottlenecks. Recommendations for future calls for R&D proposals will be made. Last but not least, the project will review and assess the implications of alternative policy measures for green corridors, both at the local and the European level.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.39M | Year: 2017

The PATHSENSE (Pathogen Sensing) ETN will bring together an interdisciplinary team of world-leading researchers from Europe to tackle a highly ambitious scientific project, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of sensory perception in bacterial pathogens. PATHSENSE will establish an innovative doctoral training programme that will deliver 13 PhD graduates and high-impact scientific outputs. The relationship between molecular structures and biological function is central to understanding any living system; however the research methodologies required to unravel these relationships are often complex and fast-changing. The team participating in this Network has the infrastructure and track-record to train ESRs in these state-of-the art methodologies, including structural biology, proteomics & protein biochemistry, molecular biology, bacterial genetics, food microbiology, mathematical modelling, cell biology, microscopy and comparative genomics. PATHSENSE will investigate the poorly understood structure-function relationships that exist within a large multi-protein complex called a stressosome, which acts as a sensory organelle in bacteria. The project will involve extensive inter-sectoral mobility of the ESRs across 7 EU countries to make full use of the complementary skills available at each of the hosting institutions. The inter-sectoral Network comprises 8 leading Universities, 1 public research institution, 4 companies (from spin-off to large multi-national) and 1 governmental agency. A major objective of this Network will be to exploit the fundamental research to develop novel antimicrobial treatments that have applications in the food and public health sectors. This project will deliver high-impact science, 13 highly-trained innovative researchers and will produce a long-lasting inter-sectoral network of collaborators who will continue to work together to exploit fundamental research for the socio-economic benefit of Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.92M | Year: 2016

Mitochondria are essential organelles found in every eukaryotic cell, required to convert food into usable energy. The mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system, which produces the majority of cellular energy in the form of ATP, is controlled by two distinct genomes: the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). Mutations in mitochondrial genes encoded by either genome could cause diseases affecting OXPHOS system, called mitochondrial diseases, whose prevalence has been estimated to be 1:8500. Moreover, dysfunction of mitochondrial OXPHOS system has emerged as a key factor in a myriad of common diseases, including neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders like Parkinsons and Alzheimers Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and was linked to aging process. Despite all this, it is surprising that our understanding of the mechanisms governing the mitochondrial gene expression and its associated pathologies remain superficial and therapeutic interventions unexplored. The basic machineries for mtDNA replication, mtDNA transcription and mitochondrial translation are known, but the regulation of these processes in response to metabolic demands is poorly understood. The complex nature of mitochondrial gene expression that relies on two different genomes calls for a multidisciplinary approach where different teams of researchers join forces. Studies in this area are not only of basic scientific interest but may also provide new avenues towards treatment of mitochondrial dysfunction in a variety of human diseases. The key aim of the REMIX Network is combine the skills of European research groups to provide strategic training of the next generation of scientists through a programme that will progress in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms and pathways that regulate mitochondrial gene expression.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SST.2008.2.1.5. | Award Amount: 12.65M | Year: 2010

The key issues that will be addressed in e-Freight are: 1. Intra-European trade is complicated due to disconnected logistic chains. This hindrance conflicts with the legitimate ambition of achieving a European maritime transport space without barriers. Linked to these issues is the broader need for simplification and harmonisation of regulatory requirements and accelerated development of EU and National Single Windows to streamline traffic and cargo reporting to authorities particularly in the context of co-modal transport. Further, safety and security issues need special attention, particularly in establishing efficient collaboration between authorities and transportation stakeholders to improve the development of capabilities for proactive and remedial measures to protect the environment as well as the security of freight transport networks. 2. Optimisation of road, rail, and waterborne transportation resources to achieve co-modality requires improved ways for transport stakeholders to establish co-operation and to integrate their processes. For this, the e-Freight project will introduce Information Highways for Co-modality to denote solutions assisting transport operators to establish common end-to-end transportation processes incorporating regulations compliance and intelligent monitoring and control. 3. In centrally managed networks prevailing in transportation services, coordination is achieved through the networks formal structure and central communications. The movement towards a much more open environment for the realisation of co-modality goals is dependent on transport service providers publishing their services in the internet in a manner that can readily be used by independent web based transport management systems. This requires both stakeholder engagement in the promotion of open networks and innovative but practical utilisation of web services standards and enabling technologies including a suitable registry of e-Freight services.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST-2007-3.2-01 | Award Amount: 25.69M | Year: 2008

The European Bus System of the Future (EBSF) project is conceived as a driver to increase the attractiveness and raise the image of the bus systems in urban areas, by means of new technologies on vehicles and infrastructure in combination with operational best practices, in a system approach. For the first time in European research, these concepts are fully endorsed by all stakeholders, with all major bus manufacturers joining their industrial capabilities along with operators and authorities pooling together in this pre-competitive research project. This project is funded on the consideration that the bus still remains the most universal solution for balanced and sustainable urban development from an economic, environmental and social standpoint, serving 80% of the total European Public Transport. The research will conceive and develop an innovative high quality bus system which will demonstrate the full potential of a new generation of urban bus networks, using state of the art clean vehicular technologies. It will integrate all necessary elements and include a breakthrough design of vehicles, infrastructures and operations placing emphasis on system approach, and identifying the potential for technical harmonisation and standardisation. The project focuses on the bus system in urban and suburban areas. For this reason all the features of the traditional bus services will be examined and developed in conjunction with the relationships between itself and the other modes of transport, in order to concentrate the objectives of the project on the development and improvement of all the characteristics of the EU Bus System of the Future. During its 48 months lifetime, the project will produce several outputs of two main families: Practical and Theoretical deliverables. The former include the results of activities aiming at technology development, and their integration, whereas the latter include concepts, tools, simulations, specifications, and recommendations


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.5-02 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2013

The objective of the PreSto GMO ERA-Net project is to clearly map out the steps needed to create and successfully implement an ERA-Net that will coordinate transnational research on the effects of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the areas of human and animal health, the environment, and techno- economics and societies. The focus of the ERA-Net will be on GMOs intentionally released into the environment and/or used immediately in feed and food applications. PreSto GMO ERA-Net brings together ministries, agencies, and funding bodies from different Members States and the scientific community to jointly prepare a strategic plan and roadmap for the implementation of the ERA-Net. In addition, the ERA-Net will explicitly take into account the wider views of a diversity of stakeholders and end-users (e.g. non-governmental organisations, industry, farmers). This is intended to strengthen ownership of the ERA-Net among stakeholders in order to encourage participation of different scientific communities in the future joint transnational calls, to enhance collaboration between actors and to increase the accountability of research trajectories and outcomes. The results of the project will form the basis for a robust ERA-Net proposal. In achieving this the project work will (1) promote the accessibility of existing scientific information to interested stakeholders and end-users, (2) lead to the harmonisation of research requirements and capacity building within Europe, (3) complement international developments, (4) contribute to a more efficient use of research funds internationally and (5) identify how strategic collaboration can be used to respond to these future research and training needs through enhancement of durable partnerships.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH.2011.3.4-2 | Award Amount: 2.23M | Year: 2012

The main purpose of RESCAP-MED is to enhance the non-communicable diseases (NCDs) research landscape in southern and eastern Mediterranean countries by (a) strengthening capacity in a set of disciplines most relevant to improving public health and reducing health inequalities, and (b) enhancing networking, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers in the Mediterranean region. The main concept for achieving this purpose and making it sustainable is: 1 the creation of a Mediterranean regional network for NCD researchers; 2 the establishment of a competitive, funded fellowship programme linked to this research network. This proposal aims to enhance and, where needed, build research capacity in the region for health, its social and environmental determinants and their complex interactions, in order to inform policy development and implementation. We concentrate on the immense challenge posed to the health systems and economies of the region by the increasing burden of NCDs. We focus on strengthening the disciplinary capacity necessary to explain the social and environmental factors causing the rise in NCDs, and necessary to identify achievable policy outcomes and interventions. We prioritise five disciplines in this action: epidemiology, health economics, environmental health, medical anthropology, and health policy evaluation. These actions would create new institutional possibilities for the future, and are made more achievable because this proposal develops out of an existing FP7-funded research collaboration (MedCHAMPS, Grant number 223075) in several countries of the region, each of which is a partner in RESCAP-MED. It thus builds directly on established and ongoing personal and institutional relationships, and the emerging evidence from MedCHAMPS. This consortium brings together 11 partners: ten academic partners and one international organisation (WHO-EMRO).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.2.2-1 | Award Amount: 7.48M | Year: 2012

Falls are a major public health concern that directly affects millions of elderly Europeans, the healthcare system, and the adult children and caregivers of older people. The V-TIME approach combines cutting edge technology with emerging concepts from gerontology, neuroscience and rehabilitation to reduce fall risk in a unique way. The V-TIME multi-modal intervention consists of treadmill training (TT) that promotes walking abilities and physical fitness. A key novel addition is the simultaneous use of a virtual reality (VR) environment that challenges, implicitly teaches and enhances cognitive skills that facilitate the safe execution of many activities of daily living: visual scanning, planning, dual tasking abilities, and obstacle negotiation. Exciting pilot studies support the idea that TT augmented with VR (TT\VR) addresses the limitations of existing fall prevention interventions. Via TT\VR, V-TIME offers task-specific training in a motivating and safe environment that can readily be reproduced and standardized. The major goal of the current proposal is to establish the beneficial effects of V-TIME training in a large (n=300) and diverse group of elderly via a multi-centre, prospective randomized controlled trial. Outcomes include post-training 6 month fall incidence rates (the primary outcome), gait, physical activity (e.g., steps walked in 7 days), cognitive function, quality of life, and neuroimaging measures (fNIRS, fMRI). The effects of dosing and an extension phase will be examined (n=60). The consortium brings together world leaders in ageing, neuroscience, rehabilitation and VR technology to test a new therapy that may dramatically reduce the negative costs of falls, financial and other. The RCT is designed to show that V-TIME offers a significant and clinically relevant greater benefit compared to current clinical management; to probe brain plasticity; and to establish efficacy on fall risk, mobility, cognitive function, and functional independence.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-24-2015 | Award Amount: 18.47M | Year: 2016

The management of febrile patients is one of the most common and important problems facing healthcare providers. Distinction between bacterial infections and trivial viral infection on clinical grounds is unreliable, and as a result innumerable patients worldwide undergo hospitalization, invasive investigation and are treated with antibiotics for presumed bacterial infection when, in fact, they are suffering from self-resolving viral infection. We aim to improve diagnosis and management of febrile patients, by application of sophisticated phenotypic, transcriptomic (genomic, proteomic) and bioinformatic approaches to well characterised large-scale, multi-national patient cohorts already recruited with EU funding. We will identify, and validate promising new discriminators of bacterial and viral infection including transcriptomic and clinical phenotypic markers. The most accurate markers distinguishing bacterial and viral infection will be evaluated in prospective cohorts of patients reflecting the different health care settings across European countries. By linking sophisticated new genomic and proteomic approaches to careful clinical phenotyping, and building on pilot data from our previous studies we will develop a comprehensive management plan for febrile patients which can be rolled out in healthcare systems across Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-2-2014 | Award Amount: 9.44M | Year: 2015

The overall aim of the REFRESH project is to contribute significantly towards the objective of reducing food waste across the EU by 30% by 2025 (which amounts to between 25 to 40 million tonnes of food not being wasted in 2025[1], worth tens of billions of Euros a year) and maximizing the value from unavoidable food waste and packaging materials. To achieve this ambitious goal, we will adopt a systemic approach and use cutting edge science to enable action by businesses, consumers and public authorities. A central ambition of the REFRESH project is to develop a Framework for Action model that is based on strategic agreements across all stages of the supply chain (backed by Governments), delivered through collaborative working and supported by evidence-based tools to allow targeted, cost effective interventions. Success will support transformation towards a more sustainable and secure EU food system, benefitting Europes economy, environment and society.


HarmonicSS vision is to create an International Network and Alliance of partners and cohorts, entrusted with the mission of addressing the unmet needs in primary Sjogren Syndrome; working together to create and maintain a platform with open standards and tools, designed to enable secure storage, governance, analytics, access control and controlled sharing of information at multiple levels along with methods to make results of analyses and outcomes comparable across centers and sustainable through Rheumatology associations. The overall idea of the HarmonicSS project is to bring together the largest well characterized regional, national and international longitudinal cohorts of patients with Primary Sjgrens Syndrome (pSS) including those participating in clinical trials, and after taking into consideration the ethical, legal, privacy and IPR issues for sharing data from different countries, to semantically interlink and harmonize them into an integrative pSS cohort structure on the cloud. Upon this harmonized cohort, services for big data mining, governance and visual analytics will be integrated, to address the identified clinical and health policy pSS unmet needs. In addition, tools for specific diagnostic procedures (e.g. ultrasonography image segmentation), patient selection for clinical trials and training will be also provided. The users of the HarmonicSS platform are researchers (basic/translational), clinicians, health policy makers and pharma companies. pSS is relevant not only due to its clinical impact but also as one of the few model diseases to link autoimmunity, cancer development (lymphoproliferation) and the pathogenetic role of infection. Thus, the study of pSS can facilitate research in many areas of medicine; for this reason, the possibility for sustainability and expandability of the platform is enhanced. Moreover, pSS has a significant impact on the healthcare systems, similar to that of rheumatoid arthritis.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-21-2016 | Award Amount: 7.07M | Year: 2017

ImpleMentAll will develop, apply, and evaluate tailored implementation strategies in the context of on-going eHealth implementation initiatives in the EU and beyond. Common mental health disorders account for an alarming proportion of the global burden of disease. Being regarded as an evidence-based psychotherapeutic eHealth intervention, Internet-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (iCBT), has the potential to answer to this societal challenge by providing an efficacious and efficient treatment from which more people can benefit. As a result, various iCBT implementation projects are currently conducted across the world. We propose to use this natural laboratory to develop and evaluate a toolkit for tailored implementation strategies that is expected to make implementation trajectories more efficient. The objectives for ImpleMentAll are: 1) To develop a generic Integrated Theory-based Framework for Intervention Tailoring Strategies (the ItFits-toolkit) for data-driven tailored implementation of evidence-based eHealth services. 2) To demonstrate the impact of the ItFits toolkit on the implementation of eHealth for common mental disorders, in 9 European countries, 2 LMIC, and Australia. 3) To disseminate the validated toolkit in various healthcare contexts across Europe. ImpleMentAll is a true multidisciplinary international collaboration that unites key experts in clinical practice, health innovation, clinical research, and implementation science. Combined with its unique setup, ImpleMentAll will be able to test if tailoring implementation strategies lead to more efficient implementation. The resulting ItFits-toolkit will enable data driven evaluation of eHealth implementation projects in terms key performance indicators for process, effectiveness, and efficiency outcomes. Its methods, materials, and strategies will provide concrete guidance on tuning implementation interventions to local determinant of practice across a variety of health care systems.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.7.2 | Award Amount: 11.54M | Year: 2010

VERITAS aims to develop, validate and assess an open framework for built-in accessibility support at all stages of ICT and non-ICT product development, including specification, design, development and testing. The goal is to introduce simulation-based and VR testing at all stages of product design and development into the automotive, smart living spaces, workplace, infotainment and personal healthcare applications areas. The goal is to ensure that future products and services are being systematically designed for all people including those with disabilities and functional limitations. Specifically, VERITAS will develop:\n\tAn Open Simulation Platform (OSP) for testing at all development stages that will provide automatic simulation feedback and reporting for guideline/methodologies compliance and quality of service.\n\tdetailed virtual user physical, cognitive, behavioural and psychological models as well as the corresponding simulation models to support simulation and testing at all stages of product planning and development.\n\taccessibility support tools at all the stages of iterative planning and development (i.e. specification, design, development, testing, evaluation) and for the five new application areas.\n\tvirtual simulation environments for ICT and non-ICT products offering tools for testing and verification mainly at the design stage but also during the development stages when links to ICT technologies are implemented.\n\ta VR simulation environment for realistic and iterative testing providing simultaneous multimodal (visual, aural, etc.) feedback to the designer/developer as well as the potential for immersive realistic simulation and virtual persona testing (i.e. the developer taking the role of the end user).\n\ta simulation environment that will support multimodal interface virtual testing in realistic scenarios that will offer the opportunity to fine tune and adapt these technologies to the specific application.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: TPT.2012.3-1. | Award Amount: 1.89M | Year: 2013

The European Transport Network Alliance-ETNA Plus-is a 3 year coordination action that will build upon the activities and knowledge acquired in the ongoing project European Transport NCP Alliance (ETNA) with a new and wider approach reflecting the new political context and the priority given to Europe 2020 and to the Horizon 2020 objectives. It will also take advantage of the positive results of TransNEW and MARKET-UP FP7 projects and, to avoid duplication of efforts, will make use of existing data and information, collaborating with the TRKC (Transport Knowledge Research Centre) and CORDIS PS. The overall objective of ETNA Plus is to foster innovation in trans-national cooperation in Transport with a focus on promoting the active participation of new actors and regions in EU research calls and projects. Transport NCPs will be key players in this mechanism, but their role will be complemented and enhanced thanks to the contribution of other relevant stakeholders, which will bring to the project a real added value both in terms of knowledge and expertise. ETNA Plus will also seek the active involvement of 56 Associated Partners (APs) nominated officially as Transport NCPs. ETNA Plus will target transnational cooperation through different activities, following a two-fold approach; on one side, specific initiatives to raise awareness on the EU transport R&I landscape will be carried out, on the other side, efforts to improve the level of expertise on EU funding (e.g. Horizon 2020) will be undertaken both at NCP and researcher level. To this end, the proposal foresees: the development of a web tool on EU funding opportunities, both public and private; an analysis of innovation strategies implemented in the industrialized Countries; the support to stakeholders to build trans-national consortia and the reinforcement of Transport NCPs and researchers expertise through ad hoc training and twinning measures; networking with other initiatives relevant to transport R


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 2.98M | Year: 2013

The advancement in life sciences has created a growing number of disciplines that are required to elucidate the increasingly complicated biological questions. This has led to an unsurpassed level of knowledge, but it has also resulted in a continuous specialization in PhD trainings, which makes the students less prepared for complex present day biological questions. To provide a better comprehensive and multidisciplinary PhD training in microbiology, we have brought together 10 EU partners and we have setup the ITN programme Advanced Multidisciplinary Training in Molecular Bacteriology (AMBER). Within this international training programme, we will investigate an important and multifaceted bacterial problem; the intertwinement of central carbon metabolism and several main cellular processes. To tackle this intricate topic the consortium comprises specialists in key areas of microbial physiology, including cell division, cell wall synthesis, RNA processing, DNA replication, metabolic regulation, stress management, metal homeostasis, metabolomics, and secondary metabolite production. This enables us to apply an integrative research approach that is necessary to solve this complex and essential bacterial problem. Importantly, this multidisciplinary project provides a unique training environment for ambitious early-stage researchers (ESRs). As a model system we will use the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. This is the best known Gram-positive organism, and it is also widely used in the biotechnology industry. In fact, the AMBER consortium includes 3 active industrial partners that use B. subtilis for different commercial purposes; enzyme production, synthesis of lipopeptide (antibiotics) or as probiotics additive. The training programme will therefore ensure that the ESRs will gain industrially relevant expertise. Thus, the AMBER programme will prepare ESRs for both a successful career in academia as well as in the private sector.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.3-03 | Award Amount: 12.00M | Year: 2013

Production diseases compromise health and welfare, generating inefficiencies which impact adversely on profitability, environmental footprint, antibiotic use and product quality. The PROHEALTH project will develop understanding of the multi-factorial dimension of animal pa-thologies linked to the intensification of production and use this to develop, evaluate and disseminate ef-fective control strategies to reduce impact. It will address production diseases of pigs and poultry raised in a wide range of EU intensive systems, using both epidemiological and experimental approaches to consider the extent of, and the risk factors associated with diseases, the influence of genotype and its modification by early life experience, and the dynamic influences of the environment on disease. The mechanisms underlying differences in disease susceptibility will be explored at different levels. Improvement strategies for diseases including neo-natal mortality, gut and respiratory disorders, leg and metabolic disorders will be evaluated in farm scale tests, and data from diverse systems used to model whole-chain socioeconomic implications of disease states and their alleviation. The consortium has expertise in veterinary science and epidemiology, physiology and immunology, ge-netics, nutrition, socioeconomics, welfare and production science of pigs and poultry. The 10 academic, 1 association 4 industry and 7 SME partners cover the full European geographic range to derive meaningful epidemiological data and test interventions across diverse production circumstances. Dissemination activities will encompass all stakeholders in the food chain and establish new e-learning tools. PROHEALTH will deliver novel diagnostics for the propensity to develop production diseases and their occurrence, and multifactorial improvement strategies that can be applied to produce better quality products in a welfare friendly manner and improve competitiveness and sustainability of EU pig & poultry systems


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: TPT-2008.0.0.8 | Award Amount: 1.63M | Year: 2010

TransNEW is a Horizontal Activity for the implementation of the Transport Programme. It is a Coordinating and Support Action aimed at supporting transport research activities in the New Member States. It contributes to the implementation of the Framework Programme and to the preparation of future Community research and technological development. It also stimulates, encourages and facilitates the participation of the New Member States and particularly SMEs in those countries in national, regional and European research. TransNEW has one primary focus to assess, analyse and define strategies for realising New Member and Associated States potentials in transport research. This is absolutely in line with the Integration/Efficiency Topic TPT.2008.8. TransNEW aims to map the transport research capacities in new Member States (and Associated States) by analysing their transport research activities to establish their recent patterns of collaboration. With this information evaluated by Mode and by Activity this will then be used to maximise the benefits of transport research at regional level and at a mode level. TransNEW covers all the transport modes including Aeronautics and aims to evaluate research capability in order to support the involvement of New Member States in a number of topics and potentially exploit the synergies between Air transport and surface transport modes. Through mode evaluation, TransNEW will assess the research actors who can make an active contribution to the common (transport research) objectives of advancing competitiveness, anticipating and responding to the socio-economic and environmental challenges of the transport system. TransNEW will cluster the research capacity results by Activities. The five Activities are: 1. Greening - environmental impacts of transport and climate change 2. Enhanced integration of transport modes 3. Safety and Security 4. Transport system efficiency and Mobility 5. Competitiveness


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-7 | Award Amount: 7.74M | Year: 2011

Over the last 40 years, treatment for childhood and adolescent cancer has improved greatly; 5- year survival after childhood cancer is now 80% in developed countries. Approximately 1 individual in 750 of young adults is now a childhood cancer survivor. Epidemiologic data on the number of European childhood cancer long-term survivors are not available, but estimates suggest a number between 300,000 and 500,000. However, significant differences in both survival and services for long-term follow-up exist across Europe. Recent research from North America has shown that the frequency of late complications continues to rise as the length of follow-up increases with, so far, no evidence of a plateau of incidence. Some late complications of treatment lead to chronic ill health or disability, and thereby constitute a significant burden both on individuals and families, and on health services and society. However, there is considerable opportunity for early identification and appropriate management of complications to improve the survivors health and quality of life, and to maximise efficient use of health services. PanCareSurFup proposes an integrated group of research and service projects to meet these needs. PanCareSurFup will, through cooperation with existing registries and databases, collect data on the risks of complications of cancer treatments to create a retrospective European cohort. Using this cohort research will centre on cardiac toxicity, second cancers and late mortality, with service projects based on a study of models of follow-up and transition to adult care. PanCareSurFup will describe risks of complications of treatment received. Risk prediction and guidelines for care and education will be based on our research and existing evidence, and tailored for each country. The expected benefit is to provide every European childhood cancer survivor with better access to care and better long-term health.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2011

The objective of the CONNECT4ACTION project is to improve communication between consumers, consumer scientists, food technology developers, and other key players in the food technology development and commercialisation process. Focusing on communication and knowledge exchange between food technologists and consumer scientists, the results of the CONNECT4ACTION project will contribute to improvement of the multidisciplinary dialogue and to increase consumer acceptance of new food products, thereby lower the failure rate of new (food) technologies in Europe. A large group of stakeholders (food scientists and technologists from companies, universities and research institutes, together with consumer scientists, ethical experts, representatives of science media/journalist, and consumers) will be connected with the project and each other via the online CONNECT4ACTION community. This online community strengthens the project with input and feedback during various stages and serves as showcase of improved communication. Based on effective communication strategies identified in the relevant literatures and, subsequently, opinions of experts based on their daily practices and experiences, this project will deliver an improved communication framework, accompanied by tools and training materials that enable food technology developers and other key players to step-by-step improve their food technology development processes. This FP7 experienced consortium, consisting of a broad, multidisciplinary network of key players that are involved in food technology development and commercialisation, has the expertise and experience from the field to disseminate and successfully implement innovative communication strategies into daily life activities. Dissemination of project outcomes receives great attention, even after the project is finished. Finally, the networking effort of CONNECT4ACTION will result in a strengthened European cooperation between public and private stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.4 | Award Amount: 4.15M | Year: 2011

Ageing is generally associated with a decrease in mobility and social interaction. A growing body of research suggests that reduced levels of out-of-home mobility can have widespread, detrimental effects for older adults. Adults for whom mobility is a problem suffer in a variety of ways. Not only are their social lives restricted but they are also more limited in terms of their access to good nutrition, leisure and other activities. For example people with restricted mobility have fewer choices in terms of where and when they can shop, and they have been found to experience problems in maintaining a balanced diet. Shopping has been found to be a useful way of maintaining physical exercise as well as providing the opportunity for social interaction. However, older adults can lose confidence in their ability to go out independently, particularly in unfamiliar and crowded spaces and may start to withdraw into their homes.Several factors adversely affect mobility, the most obvious being physical impairment, loss or reduction of visual and auditory ability and of the key function of balance. Less recognised but as important is the decline of cognitive abilities, which reduces confidence in manoeuvring around unfamiliar environments. The slower reaction to external stimuli and the diminished navigation skills can be predictors of the onset of more severe cognitive problems. With the median age in Europe projected to grow from 37.7 (2003) to 52.3 (2050), the population of potentially afflicted people is substantial.In this context, sustained levels of physical and social activity by a prolonged autonomous mobility are key to successful ageing. In this project, we pursue autonomous mobility through the development of the so-called c-walker. This mobility aid supports navigation in crowded and unstructured spaces by acquiring sensory information, by anticipating the intent of human agents and by deciding the path that minimises the risk of accidents. The c-walker is aimed at providing physical, cognitive and emotional support to older adults in public environments such as shopping centres and airports. Its expected benefits are a reduction in the anxiety of navigating in these environments and an increased likelihood of continued autonomous use of these environments. The c-Walker has a merely assistive role: it recommends a course to the user through visual, acoustic and haptic interfaces. The user remains in charge of final decision making.The c-Walker is the expected result of a multidisciplinary research, with an active involvement of the end user in the RTD activities to elicit requirements, co-define the specifications, monitor and test the project (through an advisory panel) and the prototype (through lab and field experiments). The intended users of the c-walker are older adults, who have a combination of mild cognitive, visual and/or auditory impairments and are losing confidence in independent exploration of public environments.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.1-1-B | Award Amount: 15.82M | Year: 2012

EURenOmics will integrate several established consortia devoted to rare kidney diseases with eminent need and potential for diagnostic and therapeutic progress (i.e. steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy, tubulopathies, complement disorders such a haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and congenital kidney malformations). The Consortium has access to the largest clinical cohorts assembled to date (collectively >10,000 patients) with detailed phenotypic information and comprehensive biorepositories containing DNA, blood, urine, amniotic fluid and kidney tissue. The project aims to (1) identify the genetic and epigenetic causes and modifiers of disease and their molecular pathways; (2) define a novel mechanistic disease ontology beyond phenotypical or morphological description; (3) develop innovative technologies allowing rapid diagnostic testing; (4) discover and validate biomarkers of disease activity, prognosis and treatment responses; and (5) develop in vitro and in vivo disease models and apply high-throughput compound library screening. For these purposes we will integrate comprehensive data sets from next generation exome and whole-genome sequencing, ChiP-sequencing, tissue transcriptome and antigen/epitope profiling, and miRNome, proteome/peptidome, and metabolome screening in different body fluids within and across conventional diagnostic categories. These data will be combined in a systems biology approach with high-resolution clinical phenotyping and findings obtained with a large array of established and novel in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo disease models (functiomics) to identify disease-associated genetic variants involved in monogenic or complex genetic transmission, disease-defining molecular signatures, and potential targets for therapeutic intervention. These efforts will converge in the development of innovative diagnostic tools and biomarkers and efficient screening strategies for novel therapeutic agents.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-1.3-1 | Award Amount: 15.59M | Year: 2008

ESNATS aims at developing a novel toxicity test platform based on embryonic stem cells (ESC), especially human ESC (hESC), to accelerate drug development, reduce R&D costs and propose a powerful alternative to animal tests (3 Rs). ESNATS will address current drug-testing shortcomings: - testing takes place late in the development cycle - animal test systems bear the risk of non-prediction due to inter-species variation - non-ESC assays rely on primary cells or cells of malignant origin that are hard-to-standardise and limited in regard to quantity, homogeneity and genetic diversity - existing assay systems based on primary animal cell lines do not reliably represent the physiological situation ESNATS will develop a battery of toxicity tests using hESC lines subjected to different standardised culture protocols. Tests will cover embryoid bodies in different developmental stages and differentiated derivatives including gamete and neuronal lineages, complemented with test systems for hepatic metabolism. Predictive toxicogenomics and proteomics markers will be identified. The individual tests will be integrated into an all-in-one test system. To enable future industrial use ESNATS will prepare automating and scaling up of hESC culture. The predictivity, quality and reproducibility of ESNATS will be evaluated in a proof of concept study. ESNATS benefits are to increase safety due to better predictivity of human test systems, to reduce, refine and replace animal tests, to lower testing cost, and to support medium/high throughput testing. ESNATS objectives will be achieved in a 5 year multi-disciplinary collaboration of leading European researchers in alternative testing, toxicology, ESC research, genomics, modelling, and automation. The consortium will also include representatives from regulatory bodies, the pharmaceutical industry and ethical advisors to provide guidance to ensure rapid applicability of the developed tests systems.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.4-1 | Award Amount: 7.84M | Year: 2010

Delayed graft function (DGF) is defined as the need for dialysis within seven days of renal transplantation (DGF promotes allograft rejection, requires prolonged dialysis and hospitalisation, and increases the likelihood of graft failure and ultimately the duration of renal graft survival-expectancy. The incidence of DGF occurs in 21-44% of cases following cadaveric renal graft. Several rare diseases, particularly those of genetic origin, are associated with the requirement for solid organ transplantation as the disease progresses. At Opsona Therapeutics we have developed a novel antibody (OPN-305) which has received OMP designation (EU/3/09/638) for use in the prevention of DGF. The scientific basis of this development is the inhibition of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-mediated ischaemic reperfusion injury which has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of DGF and its sequelae. The MABSOT project is designed to progress the development of this OMP through Phase I and II clinical trial. The successful completion of the programme will allow the continued development of OPN-305 as an OMP for the treatment of DGF in a range of solid organ transplant situations. OPN-305 development will have significant benefit to these patients and health care providers in reducing the prolonged hospitalisation of these individuals, providing greater longevity associated with the transplanted organ and enhanced quality of life for these individuals.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2009-1.2-2 | Award Amount: 4.72M | Year: 2010

Scaling has driven the microelectronics industry for over 40 years and revolutionised information and communication technologies, health care, education, engineering, etc. Maintaining progress has becomes more challenging and costs of fabrication facilities are rising exponentially. Possible technical/cost solutions centre on development of bottom-up techniques to (nano)pattern (the patterns yield device elements) surfaces rather than top-down photolithographic (PL) methods that are the major cost of manufacturing circuitry (a single PL system is ~65 million for next generation devices). Self-assembly is one route to nanopatterns but regularity/alignment over large areas is not consistent with circuit manufacture. Recent work on the self-assembly of block-copolymer (BCP) systems suggests that realisation of patterns of small feature size (~10 nm), at high density (i.e. spaced at ~10 nm), in precisely defined positions (to an accuracy of < 10 nm) on a large area substrate (12) is possible. This proposal will develop BCP methodology into a set of process techniques for subsequent industrial pre-development. The methodology centres around a combination of bottom-up and top-down techniques to provide the fidelity required to make the methods reproducible and reliable. This proposal would have significant value:- - Enable continued development of devices towards their ultimate performance. - Allow development of advanced circuitry at lower costs. - Prevent monopolisation of the semiconductor industry by 1 or 2 companies that can afford capital costs by opening the market to new competition. - Afford the EU with opportunities to develop profitable companies in materials, process equipment and emerging device technologies. Without a suitable EU-level engagement in this area, competition in the US and Asia will gain a significant technological lead that will minimise the EUs potential to deliver new and advanced nano-electronic devices.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.3.1 | Award Amount: 5.46M | Year: 2008

NANOSIL Network of Excellence aims to integrate at the European level the excellent European research laboratories and capabilities in order to strengthen scientific and technological excellence in the field of nanoelectronic materials and devices for terascale integrated circuits (ICs) and disseminate the results in a wide scientific and industrial community.NANOSIL will explore and assess the science and technological aspects of nanodevices and operational regimes relevant to n\4 technology node and beyond. It will provide a forward-look for the industry, enabling informed decisions to be taken on technology development in order to speed up technological innovation. It will encompass flagship projects on nanoscale CMOS and post-CMOS. The activities will thus be centred on the More Moore and Beyond-CMOS domains but natural links will also been established with the other ENIAC areas. Within the Network there are all the critical facilities and expertise to occupy and transcend this space. We will propose innovative concepts, technologies and device architectures- with fabrication down to the finest features, and utilising a wide spectrum of advanced deposition and processing capabilities, extensive characterisation and world leading device modelling. This work will be carried out through a network of joint processing, characterisation and modelling platforms. The consortium will work closely with and take steering from European industry. It will feed back data and know-how on materials and devices that deliver the required performance. This critical interaction will strengthen European integration in nanoelectronics, help in decision-making by industry and ensure that Europe remains at the forefront of nanoelectronics for the next 2 3 decades.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.4-01 | Award Amount: 11.53M | Year: 2014

Food Integrity the state of being whole, entire, or undiminished or in perfect condition. Providing assurance to consumers and other stakeholders about the safety, authenticity and quality of European food (integrity) is of prime importance in adding value to the European Agri-food economy. The integrity of European foods is under constant threat from fraudulently labelled imitations that try to exploit that added value. The FOODINTEGRITY project will directly address this issue and will be an international focal point for harmonisation and exploitation of research and technology for insuring the integrity of European food. Comprising an inner core of project participants from industry, academia, research institutes, technology providers and a global network of stakeholders, FOODINTEGRITY will rationalise and harmonise capability to provide a coherent structure and process for assuring the food supply. FOODINTEGRITY will: facilitate the sharing of information between stakeholder groups regarding European food integrity; establish processes for harmonising & exploiting existing databases; establish fit for purpose methodology to address stakeholder needs; identify and address research gaps by procuring and delivering 3M of commissioned projects; establish a self-sustaining Food-fraud early warning system for identifying emerging fraud risks; establish a self-sustaining worldwide network of stakeholders to ensure maximum uptake of the project legacy. Improved verification procedures will be developed for food control and industry stakeholders using 3 key commodities as exemplars: olive oil, spirit drinks & seafood. In addition a consumer study in China will assess their consumer attitudes in the face of substantial counterfeiting of European food. Finally it will establish expert food authenticity platforms that will supply independent expert opinion on food authenticity/food fraud to the European Commission, Codex and other national/international bodies


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2011.2.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 6.98M | Year: 2011

Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high levels of brain iron. The most common form is pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). Classic PKAN and most other NBIA cases are characterised by early childhood onset and rapid progression. Currently, there is no proven therapy to halt or reverse PKAN or any other NBIA. This is especially unfortunate as both the iron accumulation in NBIA and the biochemical defect in PKAN are predicted to be amenable to drug-based treatment. Thus, the current absence of clinical trials is not due to lack of therapeutic options but to rarity of the disease, lack of patient registries and fragmentation of therapeutic research worldwide. For example, the iron-chelating drug deferiprone has been administered to PKAN patients on an individual basis or in pilot trials, both precluding firm conclusions about its efficacy. With TIRCON, we will address this urgent and unmet need for NBIA/PKAN therapy with an ambitious and highly collaborative plan that leverages worldwide expertise. We propose a large investigator-driven randomized clinical trial of deferiprone in PKAN, bringing together leading centres and patient advocacy groups from Europe and the US to reach the required patient cohort size. In addition, together with a European SME, we propose to pursue preclinical development of pantethine and its derivatives which have shown promising efficacy in a Drosophila PKAN model. To facilitate future research, we will develop a harmonized patient registry and biomaterial bank to allow for natural history studies and biomarker development, two critical needs in NBIA research. TIRCON partners, apart from their unique clinical and basic science expertise in NBIA, have longstanding experience in investigator-driven and industry-driven randomized clinical trials. Importantly, they have been closely collaborating in recent years.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: Fission-2007-3.1-02 | Award Amount: 361.02K | Year: 2008

The growing use of diagnostic X-rays and of high-dose techniques (CT, interventions) in children and adolescents is a topic of concern in radiological protection. Studies of other populations indicate that children are generally more sensitive to health effects of radiation than adults. In addition, children have a longer life-span to express any radiation-related health effect and, because of their smaller mass children, may receive higher doses to specific organs from these procedures if examination protocols are not adapted. Procedures of particular concern include: the use of CT in children (which delivers doses that are substantially greater than those from conventional X-rays); interventional cardiology, in which fluoroscopy is used to guide small instruments such as catheters through blood vessels (which, if repeated, can deliver doses of several hundred mGy to specific organs); and the use of repeated X-rays for monitoring respiratory, cardiac and digestive pathologies in premature babies (for repeated procedures, cumulative doses range up to a few mGy and premature babies could be particularly sensitive to radiation induced diseases). Because the health effects of these low doses of radiation are expected to be relatively small, trans-national collaborative studies are needed to ensure sufficient statistical power to study these effects. In this project we seek support to assemble a critical mass of scientists involved in the study of medical radiation exposures and health effects of radiation dispersed throughout Europe with the aim of: Assessing the feasibility of establishing prospective trans-national cohorts suitable for long term follow up (including evaluation of the statistical power of the study) If the feasibility is demonstrated: - Making recommendations for future research needs including populations suitable for long term follow-up; - Developing specific project proposals, including study protocols and procedures for follow-up.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.4 | Award Amount: 14.52M | Year: 2012

The FutureID project builds a comprehensive, flexible, privacy-aware and ubiquitously usable identity management infrastructure for Europe, which integrates existing eID technology and trust infrastructures, emerging federated identity management services and modern credential technologies to provide a user-centric system for the trustworthy and accountable management of identity claims.\nThe FutureID infrastructure will provide great benefits to all stakeholders involved in the eID value chain. Users will benefit from the availability of a ubiquitously usable open source eID client that is capable of running on arbitrary desktop PCs, tablets and modern smart phones.\nFutureID will allow application and service providers to easily integrate their existing services with the FutureID infrastructure, providing them with the benefits from the strong security offered by eIDs without requiring them to make substantial investments. This will enable service providers to offer this technology to users as an alternative to username/password based systems, providing them with a choice for a more trustworthy, usable and innovative technology. For existing and emerging trust service providers and card issuers FutureID will provide an integrative framework, which eases using their authentication and signature related products across Europe and beyond. To demonstrate the applicability of the developed technologies and the feasibility of the overall approach FutureID will develop two pilot applications and is open for additional application services who want to use the innovative FutureID technology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: MG-9.6-2014 | Award Amount: 3.00M | Year: 2015

This proposal specifically addresses the topic MG.9.6-2014. Strengthening the research and innovation strategies of the transport industries in Europe. The aim of SETRIS is to deliver a cohesive and coordinated approach to research and innovation strategies for all transport modes in Europe. To fulfil the aim of SETRIS, the following objectives are envisaged: 1. To identify synergies between the transport European Technology Platforms (ETPs) strategic and research and innovation agendas (SRIAs) and between these and relevant national platforms; 2. To review and update the existing SRIAs for each of the transport ETPs within a multi-modal and integrated transport system framework; 3. To benchmark past and present research initiatives affecting the achievement of integrated transport SRIAs and market uptake; 4. To define comprehensive, credible and realistic implementation plans for each SRIAs in a coordinated framework of running ETPs; 5. To support, shape and contribute to future TRA events. Objectives 1-4 lead to two integrated agendas highlighting not only innovations or research activities that need to be done but also the changes in governance that are required to facilitate these Agendas. These objectives will be implemented through the involvement, for the first time, of representatives of all relevant transport modes and European Technology Platforms within one single collaborative initiative. The ETPs will develop a framework for long-term cooperation between actors from all transport modes that will support the cohesive and coordinated approaches to research and innovation strategies that will facilitate the delivery of a truly integrated transport system. The potential impact of SETRIS for the transport sector is extremely significant and the successful outcome of SETRIS is essential for Europes transport future. SETRIS will impact by defining comprehensive, credible and realistic implementation plans for joint SRIAs in a coordinated framework of running ETPs. This is a leap forward is cooperation between the ETPs and has been fully supported by the ETPs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: MG-7.2b-2014 | Award Amount: 1.34M | Year: 2015

The proposal is to create an ITS Observatory providing easily accessible and understandable information on Intelligent Transport Systems. The main objectives of the ITS Observatory are to bridge knowledge fragmentation across Europe, support ITS deployment by creating an intelligent software platform, create an efficient user-friendly decision-making tool which will enable fact based policy making and to create a common EU Library for ITS projects, research, pilots and implementation. The ITS Observatory will comprise three main elements; 1) a database of projects that have been completed or are underway, predominantly those with Commission funding/co-funding, 2) a mechanism for capturing factual up to date information about projects and 3) a front-end to allow users to make a range of inquiries. In addition, the ITS Observatory will contain articles, briefing notes, fact sheets etc. illustrating results of ITS deployment. The ITS Observatory responds to the call MG-7.2b-2014 Towards seamless mobility addressing fragmentation in ITS deployment in Europe of the Mobility for Growth call of the Transport challenge Smart Green and integrated transport of the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Horizon 2020. In particular, the ITS Observatory will directly address the objective to Reduce the thematic and geographical knowledge fragmentation. The ITS Observatory will alleviate existing gaps and fragmentation of the European ITS landscape by providing decision makers and related stakeholders with access to reliable, understandable and coherent information on outcomes (benefits and impacts) of existing and ongoing ITS deployment, supporting them in developing fact-based policy objectives and strategies. Through knowledge sharing the ITS Observatory will foster a faster take-up of deployment, avoiding reinventing the wheel and previously identified pitfalls and hence leading to larger scale implementation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-04-2016 | Award Amount: 7.35M | Year: 2017

Over 130,000 children born in Europe every year will have a congenital anomaly (CA; birth defect). These CAs, which are often rare diseases, are a major cause of infant mortality, childhood morbidity and long-term disability. EUROCAT is an established European network of population-based registries for the epidemiologic surveillance of CAs. EUROlinkCAT will use the EUROCAT infrastructure to support 21 EUROCAT registries in 13 European countries to link their CA data to mortality, hospital discharge, prescription and educational databases. Each registry will send standard aggregate tables and analysis results to a Central Results Repository (CRR) thus respecting data security issues surrounding sensitive data. The CRR will contain standardised summary data and analyses on an estimated 200,000 children with a CA born from 1995 to 2014 up to age 10, enabling hypotheses on their health and education to be investigated at an EU level. This enhanced information will allow optimisation of personalised care and treatment decisions for children with rare CAs. Registries will be supported in using social media platforms to connect with families who live with CAs in their regions. A novel sustainable e-forum, ConnectEpeople, will link these families with local, national and international registries and information resources. ConnectEpeople will involve these families in setting research priorities and ensuring a meaningful dissemination of results. Findings will provide evidence to inform national treatment guidelines, such as concerning screening programs, to optimise diagnosis, prevention and treatment for these children and reduce health inequalities in Europe. An economic evaluation of the hospitalisation costs associated with CA will be provided. The CRR and associated documentation, including linkage and standardisation procedures and ConnectEpeople forum will be available post-EUROlinkCAT thus facilitating future local and EU level analyses.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.22M | Year: 2017

GETM3 Global Entrepreneurial Talent Management 3 - focuses on young talent as a key driver of future development, developed through co-operation of 3 stakeholders: employers (inc MNC & SMEs), universities and students/graduates. Despite a widely recognized importance of young talent (e.g. Europe 2020), its potential remains largely untapped. They are educated and entrepreneurial and yet experience instability in employment. At the same time, employers report skills mismatch and difficulties with attracting, managing and retaining young talent. To tackle this paradoxical situation, an innovative, multi-perspective approach is needed, reinforced by our 15 partner consortium; comprising of a transnational, inter-disciplinary, inter-generational, gender balanced and inter-sectorial research team. The main objective of GETM3 is to improve employability and future global talent management to support economic development by capitalizing on entrepreneurialism as a key characteristic of the young. To achieve this objective, the project is divided into six work packages. Three WPs focus on in-depth research of specific issues from each of the stakeholder perspectives. The Integration and Innovation WP, essential for impact, aims to integrate research outputs and develop GETM3 across dimensions: generations, genders, disciplines, countries, sectors and stakeholders. These are supported by a project management & administration WP and by the Researcher development, knowledge transfer & dissemination WP. In total, 292 mobility months are planned, 232 of those are for EU partners. Matched funding specially dedicated to H2020 will be claimed from the Korean Research Foundation. The overall design of the project builds impact through researcher mobility in two ways: researchers will gain first hand and in-depth insights on specific issues from various perspectives, and will develop their skills through networking and training incorporated into mobility with sandpit events.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 3.39M | Year: 2011

Plant cell walls constitute a highly complex and dynamic entity of extreme importance in plant growth and development. Growing cell walls can be considered as fibre composites, where cellulose microfibrils are embedded in a matrix of complex glycans. It is becoming increasingly apparent (i) that cell wall glycans are diverse in structural terms, (ii) that these structures are developmentally regulated, and (iii) that not all cell walls in an organ are comprised of the same configurations of glycans. The architecture of plant cell walls is governed by the fine structure of their constitutive polymers, this fine structure having profound effects on polymers functional properties after extraction or in planta. The immense complexity and spatial & temporal versatility of cell wall glycans render a full understanding of their structure-function relationships extremely challenging for plant biology research and for the uses of cell wall-derived materials in industrial contexts. WallTraC has thereby two major interlinked strategic objectives: (i) To develop new molecular tools & techniques for the analysis of plant cell walls & their component polymers - mainly pectin and cellulose - with direct applicability to industrial end-users in the functional food ingredients & plant fibre sectors; (ii) To provide high quality, inter-sectorial & trans-disciplinary training in plant cell wall analysis & complementary skills with the aim of enabling young scientists to respond to future demands in both academic and private sectors thereby securing the future EU expertise base. The WallTraC consortium gathers leading researchers on plant cell walls from the private sector, universities & research centres and will provide world-class infrastructures for research & training. This network of scientists, from distinct but complementary disciplines, will collectively allow the dissection of plant cell wall structures as a prelude to their industrial exploitation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.86M | Year: 2011

ODHIN is a Europe wide project involving research institutions from nine European countries that will help to optimize the delivery of health care interventions by understanding how better to translate the results of clinical research into every day practice. ODHIN will use the implementation of identification and brief intervention (IBI) programmes for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption (HHAC) in primary health care (PHC) as a case study. There is strong evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of IBI in reducing HHAC and its consequences, which include more than 60 clinical diagnoses and conditions. A series of systematic reviews investigating the impact of different behavioural, organizational and financial strategies in changing provider behaviour across a range of clinical lifestyle interventions will be undertaken. The knowledge base of potential barriers and facilitators to implementing IBI will be updated. A stepped cluster randomised controlled trial will be undertaken with five arms and three time phases to test the incremental effect of strategies. Phase A will aim at raising awareness, insight, and acceptance of performance of IBI in PHC. Phases B and C will aim at acceptance, change and maintenance of implementation with financial and organisational strategies used in a different order to test the impact of both separately and in sequence. Modelling studies will test the impact of different IBI approaches on changes in alcohol consumption and the resulting impacts on healthcare costs and health-related quality of life. ODHIN will build a clinical evidence-based database on effective and cost-effective IBI measures for use in PHC and will develop a tool to assess the extent of provision of clinical practice. A project website and a series of scientific publications, reports and fact sheets will widely disseminate the documented and evaluated conceptual models across diverse health care settings throughout Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-8.3-2016 | Award Amount: 2.99M | Year: 2016

The Transportation sector employs over 10 million persons in the EU today. At the same time, Transport is a social sector that is rapidly developing, changing and being influenced to the maximum extent by the development of automation, electrification and greening of transport, among others, thus facing problems in staffing its several domains with appropriate and qualified personnel. This fact, makes the need for changes in training and education content, curricula, tools and methodologies absolutely imperative, incorporating lifelong learning aspects for the professionals in all transports areas. SKILLFUL vision is to identify the skills and competences needed by the Transport workforce of the future and define the training methods and tools to meet them. For all the above trends, employability will be strongly connected by SKILLFUL to future transport job requirements for all transportation modes and multimodal chains (which constitute a key transport of the future trend) and for all levels/types of workers, while all training modes will be included and integrated in a balanced way. To achieve this, SKILLFUL aims to review the existing, emerging and future knowledge and skills requirements of workers at all levels in the transportation sector, to structure the key specifications and components of the curricula and training courses that will be needed to meet these competence requirements optimally and to identify and propose new business roles in the education and training chain, such as those of knowledge aggregator, training certifier and training promoter, in order to achieve European wide competence development. Project results are verified through s wide number of Pilots with low to high skilled workers from all transportation modes Europewide.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: MG-6.3-2016 | Award Amount: 1.81M | Year: 2016

The aim of the project is to build a collaborative capacity community and deployment programme to support public and private stakeholders in the implementation of ITS (C-ITS) with training and educational resources which enable knowledge transfer about the benefits and deployment of ITS. The project will assist public and private stakeholders in developing their knowledge, skills, and abilities to build technical, business and policy making proficiency of ITS deployment while furthering their career paths.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2009.2.2.1.5 | Award Amount: 8.58M | Year: 2010

The Future of Reefs in a Changing Environment (FORCE) Project partners a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from Europe and the Caribbean to enhance the scientific basis for managing coral reefs in an era of rapid climate change and unprecedented human pressure on coastal resources. The overall aim is to provide coral reef managers with a toolbox of sustainable management practices that minimise the loss of coral reef health and biodiversity. An ecosystem approach is taken that explicitly links the health of the ecosystem with the livelihoods of dependent communities, and identifies the governance structures needed to implement sustainable development. Project outcomes are reached in four steps. First, a series of experimental, observational and modelling studies are carried out to understand both the ultimate and proximate drivers of reef health and therefore identify the chief causes of reef degradation. Second, the project assembles a toolbox of management measures and extends their scope where new research can significantly improve their efficacy. Examples include the first coral-friendly fisheries policies that balance herbivore extraction against the needs of the ecosystem, the incorporation of coral bleaching into marine reserve design, and creation of livelihood enhancement and diversification strategies to reduce fisheries capacity. Third, focus groups and ecological models are used to determine the efficacy of management tools and the governance constraints to their implementation. This step impacts practical reef management by identifying the tools most suited to solving a particular management problem but also benefits high-level policy-makers by highlighting the governance reform needed to implement such tools effectively. Lastly, the exploitation and dissemination of results benefits from continual engagement with practitioners. The project will play an important and measurable role in helping communities adapt to climate change in the Caribbean.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-4-07 | Award Amount: 1.17M | Year: 2009

PEGASUS aims to provide policy support regarding the development, implementation and commercialisation of GM animals, and derivative foods. The results will contribute to the FP7 KBBE by integrating existing social, (including existing public perception) environmental and economic knowledge regarding GM animals. The use of GM in farmed animals (aquatic and terrestrial) will be reviewed. A foresight exercise will be conducted to predict future developments. Two case studies (1 aquatic, 1 terrestrial) will be applied to identify the pros and cons of GM animals from the perspectives of the production chain (economics, agri-food sector) and the life sciences (human and animal health, environmental impact, animal welfare, sustainable production). Ethical and policy concerns will be refined through application of combined ethical matrix and policy workshops involving EU and non-EU stakeholders. The case studies will be used to demonstrate best practice in public engagement in the policy process. The activities will provide European policy support regarding GM animals and the foods derived from them, taking into account public perceptions, the competitiveness of EU animal production, and risk-benefit assessments linked with human and animal health, environmental impact, and sustainable production. A final stakeholder dissemination workshop will disseminate the results to the EU policy community.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-24-2016 | Award Amount: 3.21M | Year: 2016

ROLINCAP will search, identify and test novel phase-change solvents, including aqueous and non-aqueous options, as well as phase-change packed bed and Rotating Packed Bed processes for post-combustion CO2 capture. These are high-potential technologies, still in their infancy, with initial evidence pointing to regeneration energy requirements below 2.0 GJ/ton CO2 and considerable reduction of the equipment size, several times compared to conventional processes . These goals will be approached through a holistic decision making framework consisting of methods for modeling and design that have the potential for real breakthroughs in CO2 capture research. The tools proposed in ROLINCAP will cover a vast space of solvent and process options going far beyond the capabilities of existing simulators. ROLINCAP follows a radically new path by proposing one predictive modelling framework, in the form of the SAFT- equation of state, for both physical and chemical equilibrium, for a wide range of phase behaviours and of molecular structures. The envisaged thermodynamic model will be used in optimization-based Computer-aided Molecular Design of phase-change solvents in order to identify options beyond the very few previously identified phase-change solvents. Advanced process design approaches will be used for the development of highly intensified Rotating Packed Bed processes. Phase-change solvents will be considered with respect to their economic and operability RPB process characteristics. The sustainability of both the new solvents and the packed-bed and RPB processes will be investigated considering holistic Life Cycle Assessment analysis and Safety Health and Environmental Hazard assessment. Selected phase-change solvents, new RPB column concepts and packing materials will be tested at TRL 4 and 5 pilot plants. Software in the form of a new SAFT- equation of state will be tested at TRL 5 in the gPROMS process simulator.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-3 | Award Amount: 2.30M | Year: 2013

RARE-Bestpractices will develop a sustainable networking platform, supporting the collection of standardized and validated data and efficient exchange of knowledge and reliable information on rare diseases (RD). RD are characterized by low prevalence (EU 5:10000 persons). There are more than 5000, overall affecting about 30 million citizens of all ages in the EU. RD are often life-threatening and chronically debilitating, and healthcare is impaired by limited knowledge. Collaborative efforts are needed to tackle RD to prevent significant morbidity, perinatal or early mortality, to reduce socio-economic burdens and to improve an individuals quality of life. RARE-Bestpractices aims to improve clinical management of RD patients, narrowing the existing gap among EU MS and other countries, also considering the application of patients rights in cross-border healthcare (EU Directive 2011/24). The platform deals with RD as a global health issue, exploiting and integrating contributions from all EU MS and other world areas (Caucasus, Europe, America, Oceania, PAHO/WHO) and will identify additional research needs to further improve clinical practice. Fostering synergistic collaboration among experts, patients representatives, policy makers, institutions, agencies, and other organizations experienced in systematic reviews and guidelines production, RARE-Bestpractices will focus on: a) collection, evaluation and dissemination of existing best practices; b) an agreed methodology suitable to develop and update best practice guidelines; c) training activities targeted at key stakeholders to spread expertise and knowledge; and d) a forum for exchanging information, sharing lessons learnt, and facilitating collaborations. The platform is conceived for health care providers, experts, patients, policy makers and best practice guideline developers with outcomes that support closure of healthcare gaps among countries and improved clinical management of RD patients globally.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2007-2-1-02 | Award Amount: 3.04M | Year: 2008

The general objective of the FOCUS-BALKANS project is to improve competencies and understanding in the field of consumer food science in the Western Balkan countries (WBC). The scientific results of the research will make important contribution to the public health and consumer protection and to the achievement of the objectives within the FP7. The specific objectives are to: - Develop a network of universities, institutes, high schools, consumer organisations, NGOs and private enterprises active in the field of food consumer science with are able to develop joint-research activities; - Have a better understanding of food consumers in the WBCs, with a focus on products with positive nutritional properties (fruits and health / diet foods) and / or sustainability (organic and traditional food products). Formal training will be organised for key research organisations in the WBCs to enable them to become familiar with state of the art methodologies, practical techniques and theories. The training activities, organised in each WBC-country, target a wide range of organisations from the public and private research sectors, NGOs & consumer associations. 6 regional training meetings will be designed by the project partners and associated organisations. Four studies on niche markets plus one quantitative survey will systematically be conducted by WBC organisations as a mechanism for learning-by-doing. Two open seminars will bring together a wider spectrum of stakeholders including food supply chains representatives and policy-makers. Altogether, these actors will be invited to participate in the Food Consumer Science Balkan Network, which will seek to stimulate regional and interdisciplinary co-operation. The research, training and networking activities are intimately interlinked and will have strong synergies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2011.2.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.38M | Year: 2011

The ARCH research project Architecture and roadmap to manage multiple pressures on lagoons aims to develop participative methodologies in collaboration with policy makers, local authorities and stakeholders to manage the multiple problems affecting lagoons (estuarine coastal areas). These areas represent ecosystems that are very vulnerable for climate change, increasing urbanisation and industrialisation. A central feature of ARCH is to provide realistic solutions to manage these pressures and establish a better connection (the arch) between science and policy. This is accomplished by facilitating the transition (i) from segregated disciplinary scientific results to well integrated and usable scientific knowledge, (ii) from government and sectoral policies towards governance and sustainable management; and (iii) from an unaware and uninformed lagoon community towards an involved and well-informed community. ARCH will work with 10 case study lagoons and estuaries having a geographical distribution covering all major seas surrounding Europe. A participatory workshop methodology will be used at the lagoon sites to develop a decision framework to choose strategies, interventions and measures to manage the existing and future problems in the lagoon. This is accomplished using an integrated planning approach, considering ecosystem services to assess the social, economic and ecological state of the lagoon and linking this to spatial planning methodology. The final products of ARCH are roadmaps for implementation of realistic solutions at the lagoon scale, a management guide for coastal managers and policy makers in Europe and the European Lagoon Management Handbook. The project will actively disseminate products and experiences via newsletters, multiplier seminars, a website and specific web-tool for discussion, and a final conference. The legacy beyond the lifetime of the project is ensured by the connection to international networks, like the UNESCO HELP-program.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: Fission-2008-2.1.1 | Award Amount: 39.59M | Year: 2009

Most of the actors involved in severe accident research in Europe, plus Canada, Korea and the United States (41 partners), will network in SARNET2 (Severe Accident Research NETwork of Excellence - Phase 2) their capacities of research in order to resolve important pending issues on postulated severe accidents of existing and future Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The project has been defined in order to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute a sustainable consortium in which common research programmes and a common computer tool to predict NPP behaviour during a postulated severe accident (ASTEC integral code) are developed. With this aim, the SARNET2 partners contribute to a Joint Programme of Activities, which consists of: - Maintaining and improving an advanced communication tool (developed during SARNET Phase 1) for accessing all project information, fostering exchange of information, and managing documents; - Harmonizing and re-orienting the research programmes, and defining new ones; - Performing experimental programmes on high priority issues, defined during SARNET Phase 1; - Analyzing experimental results in order to elaborate a common understanding of relevant phenomena; - Developing the ASTEC code (including its applicability to all types of European NPPs), which capitalizes in terms of physical models the knowledge produced within SARNET2; - Developing Scientific Databases, in which all the results of research programmes are stored in a common format (DATANET); - Developing education courses on severe accidents for students and researchers, and training courses for specialists; - Promoting personnel mobility amongst various European organizations; - Organizing yearly a large international conference on Severe Accident research (ERMSAR). After the first phase (2004-2008), and the four-year proposed second phase, co-funded by the EC, the network will evolve toward self-sustainability: a legal entity will be created.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SST-2007-2.1-02 | Award Amount: 2.75M | Year: 2008

Efficient use of transport modes and resources requires understanding the options and alternatives and being able to make the right logistics choices. Benchmarking is an instrument which can help to answer this question. Differences in the performance of various modes within the transport sector of a given country, and between the transport systems of different countries, imply that there is a significant potential for improvement. Ongoing technological advances and changes in economic and institutional approaches ensure that this potential is constantly evolving. The transportation sector is influenced and moulded by ongoing economic, environmental and political (usually in the form of public finances) pressures to realise its potential for improvement. BE LOGIC project vision In our opinion, the major improvement potential in logistics performance is among small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), including shippers with relative small transport volumes. Therefore, the focus in BE LOGIC lies on applying the logistics benchmark methodology on SMEs. Key objectives of BE LOGIC - Improve the efficiency within and across different modes of transport - Support the development of a quality logistics system Derived objectives and research questions: - Develop a methodology to assess transport logistics performance in quantitative terms at different levels in Europe and globally - Applying the benchmark methodology to assess logistics and intermodal policies of Member States and other countries - and to assess transport logistics choices and performance from shippers/LSP - and to assess transport logistics performance from transshipment points - Examine existing quality standards (e.g. ISO, CEN) for transport logistics - Consider the need for new quality standards for transport logistics Our approach includes 3 viewpoints: - Viewpoint from the policy maker . - Viewpoint from transport chains - Viewpont from transhipment points


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.4.4-1 | Award Amount: 3.97M | Year: 2008

Autoimmune Addisons disease (AAD) is an endocrine disease resulting from the immune systems destruction of hormone producing cells in the adrenal cortex. Diagnosis is frequently first established after a life-threatening adrenal crisis, often resulting in untimely fatalities. The disease is rare, more common in women than in men, and also affects children. AAD very frequently occurs with other autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid disease and/or premature ovarian failure. Based on a European network of patient registry and biobanks, a translational approach using genetics, immunology, clinical management, and epidemiology, the project aims to unravel the pathogenesis and natural course of AAD, ultimately to improve diagnosis and treatment as well as to offer strategies for disease prevention. The consortium capitalises on the joint cutting edge expertise of leading European investigators covering all these fields. Exploiting these resources, we will describe the natural course of the disease with focus on factors limiting quality of life, and identify and characterise the disease-causing genes, using the corresponding disease in a spontaneous dog model and a gene targeted mouse model. In parallel, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of autoimmunity directed at the adrenal cortex will be unravelled both in humans with ADD and in the genetic mouse model. Together, these efforts will increase our still incomplete understanding of pathogenic pathways operational in AAD and pave the way for new therapies of this debilitating disorder. Moreover, clinical studies will be performed to evaluate more physiological and personalised treatment with cortisol also aimed at prevention. As an autoimmune model disease the results of the project will not only lead to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for Addison patients, but also increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases in general.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: NMP.2011.2.3-3 | Award Amount: 1.68M | Year: 2012

Most products are produced by means of the established mass production infrastructure. Traditionally, this involves large stocks, high manual labor, large capital investments, high energy use, long distance transportation. Although many advanced new materials have unique functional properties that hold a great promise for innovation, they often need to meet the criteria and characteristics of this established mass production paradigm. This delays the exploitation of the huge potential of whole new classes of materials. Combined with major societal trends and consumer needs like customization, personalization, on-demand fulfillment and the fact that the world is becoming ever more digital and networked, there is a need for a paradigm shift in manufacturing called Digital Fabrication. **Digital Fabrication can be defined as a new kind of industry that uses computer-controlled tools and processes to transform digital designs and materials directly into useful products.** DIGINOVA will establish the current status across material domains and application domains in Europe in order to identify the most promising technology and business propositions for Digital Fabrication. The project consortium, consisting of 4 large companies, 7 SMEs and 9 research institutes will identify and connect main stakeholders through establishment of innovation networks centred around concrete business cases to determine the added value and feasible routes to commercialization. The DIGINOVA consortium has broad research and development experience covering a wide range of materials and applications. The consortium is well equipped to generate international interest and expanding participation in the opportunities it identifies and has a proven track record in drafting roadmaps, establishing networks, involving stakeholders and informing the public at large. The DIGINOVA project will last 24 months and requests EU contribution of 1.265.785.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.1-1-C | Award Amount: 17.68M | Year: 2012

Despite examples of excellent practice, rare disease (RD) research is still mainly fragmented by data and disease types. Individual efforts have little interoperability and almost no systematic connection between detailed clinical and genetic information, biomaterial availability or research/trial datasets. By developing robust mechanisms and standards for linking and exploiting these data, RD-Connect will develop a critical mass for harmonisation and provide a strong impetus for a global trial-ready infrastructure ready to support the IRDiRC goals for diagnostics and therapies for RD in close collaboration with the successful A/B projects. It will build on and transform the current state-of-the-art across databases, registries, biobanks, bioinformatics, and ethical considerations to develop a quality-assured and comprehensive integrated hub/platform in which complete clinical profiles are combined with -omics data and sample availability for RD research. The integrated, user-friendly RD-Connect platform, built on efficient informatics concepts already implemented in international research infrastructures for large-scale data management, will provide access to federated databases/registries, biobank catalogues, harmonised -omics profiles, and cutting-edge bioinformatics tools for data analysis. All patient data types will be linked via the generation of a unique identifier (RD-ID) developed jointly with the US NIH. The RD-Connect platform will be one of the primary enablers of progress in IRDiRC-funded research and will facilitate gene discovery, diagnosis and therapy development. RD-Connect has the RD field at its heart and brings together partners with a strong track record in RD research (gene discovery and development of innovative treatments), as well as committed IRDiRC funding partners and representatives of all major international RD initiatives (EU/US/AU/JP) spanning patient organisations, research and public health, to maximise impact to RD patients


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2011

Project aim. Chronic diseases represent an important challenge facing healthcare systems. Research has consistently shown gaps between knowledge and practice for chronic illness care. Tailoring implementation interventions implies that the choice and content of implementation interventions are based on assessment of local barriers and enabling factors. It is widely believed that tailoring contributes to effective implementation, but little is known about specific methods and models for tailoring. The project Tailoring implementation for chronic diseases (TICD) aims to develop better methods of tailoring implementation interventions to barriers and enablers for knowledge implementation in chronic illness care. Project plan. The 48-month project has been organized in 4 research work packages, a dissemination work package and a project management work package. WP1 will systematically review evidence on methods and models for tailoring implementation interventions. WP2 will test different methods and models for identifying barriers and enablers for implementation. WP3 will test different methods and models for matching implementation interventions to barriers and enablers. WP4 comprises of evaluations of the effectiveness of the resulting implementation interventions, and the influence of hypothesized barriers and enablers. We will perform comparitve evaluations, focusing on five chronic conditions: chronic heart failure, obesity, mental health, asthma and COPD, and multimorbidity. Deliverables of the TICD project are: scientific papers on the validity and effectiveness of specific tailoring methods and models, practical guidelines on tailoring for stakeholders, and specific evidence on improving medical care for the targeted chronic conditions.. The TICD consortium comprises of 7 research groups with extensive experience in implementation research, who have successfully worked together in different configurations for over 15 years.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-3-1-02;KBBE-2007-3-1-01 | Award Amount: 7.66M | Year: 2008

With oil reserves diminishing and the effects of industrial emissions on global climate, there is a need for renewable carbon-neutral industrial feedstocks. First generation biorefineries, producing biofuels and bioplastics by the fermentation of sugar or starch, are seeing a rapid expansion and are adding stress to food supplies. A more sustainable option is to use plant biomass from agricultural by-products, or dedicated biomass crops. Plant biomass is underutilized, abundant and composed mostly of cell wall polysaccharides. Conversion of these polysaccharides to sugars will provide cheap and abundant raw materials for industrial biotechnology. The use of plant biomass in this way is hampered by the high cost of saccharification due to the recalcitrance of cell walls to enzymatic hydrolysis. RENEWALL aims to find ways to overcome this technical bottleneck by identifying and modifying the structural features of plant cell walls that make them difficult to process. Our partnership brings together outstanding biologists, chemists, and enzymologists, as well as industrialists from the plant breeding and biotechnology sectors, from Europe and the USA who can together take an integrated multidisciplinary approach to solving this fundamental problem. Combining genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and systems approaches, we will achieve a step-change in our understanding of the biosynthesis of the major components of plant biomass, namely; lignin, cellulose and matrix polysaccharides. Using state-of-the-art and novel analytical methods we will determine the basis of the recalcitrance of plant biomass to saccharification. Combining these approaches, we will identify new genes that can be manipulated to improve the ease and yield of biomass saccharification and will generate rational approaches for improving the quality of plant biomass as an industrial feedstock


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST.2008.1.1.8. | Award Amount: 10.91M | Year: 2010

Increasing environmental concerns and soaring oil prices are creating a new focus on fuel efficiency for the marine industry. Combining low emissions with demands for more advanced vessels than ever before drives the need for radically new propulsion concepts delivering a step-change in efficiency. STREAMLINE is the response of the marine community to this demand that will be addressed through four key objectives. The first objective of STREAMLINE is to demonstrate radically new propulsion concepts delivering an increase in efficiency of at least 15% over current state-of-the-art. The concepts will be designed for maximisation of energy conversion combined with low levels of cavitation, noise and vibration. The research will look at novel applications of large area propulsion, a biomechanical system and distributed thrust (via multiple propulsors). As its second objective, STREAMLINE will investigate methods to fully optimise current SoA systems including conventional screw propeller systems, pods and waterjets. The key here is exploitation of new CFD methods to pursue improvements without dramatic vessel configuration changes. The third objective of STREAMLINE is to develop advanced CFD tools and methods to optimise the hydrodynamic performance of the new propulsion concepts, particularly by analysis of integrated hull and propulsor. Finally, STREAMLINE will characterise the operational, economic and classification aspects of each of the new propulsion concepts. STREAMLINE will demonstrate solutions for a wide range of applications. Short sea shipping and inland waterway operation will be focussed on specifically, as they are identified as key components of transport that can provide a means of coping with the growing congestion of road and rail infrastructure and tackling air pollution. The STREAMLINE consortium, led by Rolls-Royce, is made up of 30 partners from 8 Countries, providing world leading expertise and capability from the EU marine Industry.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.2.3-02 | Award Amount: 12.29M | Year: 2011

The present proposal sees the development of business and value creation models as central to the development of personalised nutrition and thus it is intended to engage in a series of interviews with key stakeholders, which will generate a number of scenarios to be considered by these stakeholders. Parallel to that we will run some focus groups with consumers and develop a tool to ascertain consumer attitudes to personalised nutrition in 8 EU countries (1,000 per country) representing a breadth of gastronomic traditions. Within these 8 countries, we will recruit 1,280 subjects and offer 3 levels of personalised nutrition: 1 Personalised dietary advice alone; 2: personalised dietary advice based on biochemical phenotypic data; 3: the latter to include genomic data. These will be compared with a control group, which will be offered non-personalised dietary advice. All of the data on dietary intake and all of the advice will be Internet delivered and will last 6 months. Within each of the 3 levels of personalised nutrition groups, half will receive their feedback at months 0, 3 and 6 while the other half will have continuous feedback on demand with intensive coaching. The overall outcome measurement will be changes in a healthy eating index. The data gathered in this study will feed into the development of algorithms to provide automated feedback for future services delivering personalised advice on food choice. We will bring together an international group of experts to develop best practice in the application of all aspects of nutrigenomic research to personalised nutrition. We will also scope out existing and future technologies, particularly those involving biofeedback, which will help the development of personalised nutrition. Finally we develop position papers on the ethical and legal aspects of personalised nutrition. Permeating all of this work will be a wide-ranging communications programme aimed at all stakeholders of relevance to personalised nutrition.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-3-05 | Award Amount: 4.17M | Year: 2010

CamCon aims to improve the control of Campylobacter in primary poultry production in various parts of Europe and thereby enable the production of low-risk broilers. The project places great emphasis on ensuring rapid and effective dissemination of scientific achievements to end-users, in particular the EU poultry industry. The consortium consists of 10 participants from seven countries representing various parts of Europe. The participating institutions include national diagnostic laboratories, institutions providing research and advisory services and universities. The scientists involved have a strong background in Campylobacter research and have published many original publications in the field. CamCon will be a 4-year project with a total budget of 4.17 million where the scientific work is organized in five Work Packages: WP1 will study the epidemiology of Campylobacter in broilers in selected regions and climates of the EU and compare the sub-types found in chickens; WP2 will investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of pre-harvest interventions; WP3 will implement on-site, telecommunication-based, hands-free detection methods and develop quantitative screening methods; WP4 will develop second-generation farm-to-fork contamination models for more precise quantitative risk assessments; and WP5 will prepare guidelines, educational videos, Internet-based tools, and propose EU standards for producers, regulators and consumers, which are based on the results of the research carried out in the other Work Packages.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2010.1.1-2.;SST.2010.5.1-1. | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2011

With climate change coming to the forefront of societys perception, there is increasing pressure on all industries to CO2 emissions through increased efficiency and the maritime industry is no exception. The objective of ULYSSES is to demonstrate, through a combination of ultra slow speeds and complementary technologies, that the efficiency of the world fleet can be increased to a point where the following CO2 targets are met : Before 2020, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30% compared to 1990 levels. Beyond 2050, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% compared to 1990 levels. ULYSSES focuses on bulk carriers and tankers as these ship types produce 60% of the CO2 from ocean-going vessels . As bulk carriers and tankers are reasonably similar in design and operation, it is felt that investigating these ships will give the best value for money in terms of potential impact of the project. Additionally, it is more technically challenging to reduce the speed of these ship types as they are relatively slow speed already and therefore it is expected that directional stability and other seakeeping issues will arise. However, the results of the project will be directly transferable to other ship types. To achieve these goals, it is expected that the target speeds will be: Phase I - Existing vessel in 2020: ~10 knots Phase II - New vessel built in 2020: ~7.5 knots Phase III - New vessel built in 2050: ~5 knots


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH.2013.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 6.38M | Year: 2014

The multi-disciplinary CUPESSE project carries out a comparative analysis of both the demand and supply side of youth unemployment in ten Member States of the EU and Associated Countries (i.e. Austria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom). These ten countries represent the main empirical scope of the project, but whenever possible, the analysis is extended to include all European countries. CUPESSE has five main objectives. The first objective is to obtain a more refined understanding of the supply side of young adults employment by concentrating on how the inter-generational accumulation of social capital and cultural capital in the context of family organisation influences the economic self-sufficiency and entrepreneurship of young people in Europe. The second objective is to examine how supply-side factors and demand-side factors affect the unemployment of young adults. In this context we are particularly interested in the degree to which the attitudes and skills of young adults match with employers demands. The third objective is to understand the implications of young adults unemployment in the longer term, including the effects on the unemployed individuals and on society as a whole. The fourth objective is to investigate the degree to which flexicurity policies, policies supporting business start-ups and self-employment, and policies promoting education and training platforms are embraced by the European states and to assess their impacts on young adults unemployment. The fifth objective of the CUPESSE project is to present ideas for new policy measures and formulate strategy for overcoming youth unemployment in Europe. To attain this goal, the project brings together theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches from four academic disciplines, namely economics, political science, psychology, and sociology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SSH-2007-2.2-01 | Award Amount: 1.65M | Year: 2007

This proposal outlines the organisation and strategic activities of a social platform, Social Polis, for the development of a research agenda and scientific dialogue addressing the role of cities and social cohesion. Its central purpose is to engage significant stakeholders from the scientific, civil society and governance sectors in establishing key scientific and policy issues for the agenda, informing focussed and coherent FP7-SSH calls for proposals on this theme in March 2008 and June 2009. Social Polis will mobilise a wide range of relevant findings, recommendations and scientific/practitioner networks from previous research projects under Framework Programmes 4, 5 and 6. Building on these experiences, Social Polis will organise consultation with a wide network of researchers and other stakeholders, including two workshops and one large-scale conference. Coordination and support activities will include: surveying relevant literature, starting from the conclusions of FP4, 5 and 6 projects, for findings, recommendations, missing topics and methodological shortcomings, to define a future research agenda on Cities and Social Cohesion in Europe and the world; meetings and other forms of consultation with different groups of significant stakeholders; synthesising research agendas and set priorities; preparing two draft call texts on Cities and Social Cohesion (for FP7-SSH-2008 and -2009) organising a semi-permanent meeting room between significant stakeholders, which will ultimately lead to the establishment of a Social Platform; following developments in international research, stakeholder and policy debates relating to cities and social cohesion; dissemination and provision of educational resources.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-01a-2014 | Award Amount: 9.93M | Year: 2015

Feed-a-Gene aims to better adapt different components of monogastric livestock production systems (i.e., pigs, poultry and rabbits) to improve the overall efficiency and to reduce the environmental impact. This involves the development of new and alternative feed resources and feed technologies, the identification and selection of robust animals that are better adapted to fluctuating conditions, and the development of feeding techniques that allow optimizing the potential of the feed and the animal. To reach this overall objective, the project will: - Develop new and alternative feeds and feed technologies to make better use of local feed resources, green biomass and by-products of the food and biofuel industry. - Develop methods for the real-time characterization of the nutritional value of feeds to better use and adapt diets to animal requirements. - Develop new traits of feed efficiency and robustness allowing identification of individual variability to select animals that are more adapted to changes in feed and environmental conditions. - Develop biological models of livestock functioning to better understand and predict nutrient and energy utilization of animals along their productive trajectory. - Develop new management systems for precision feeding and precision farming combining data and knowledge from the feed, the animal, and the environment using innovative monitoring systems, feeders, and decision support tools. - Evaluate the overall sustainability of new management systems developed by the project. - Demonstrate the innovative technologies developed by the project in collaboration with partners from the feed industry, breeding companies, equipment manufacturers, and farmers organisations to promote the practical implementation of project results. - Disseminate new technologies that will increase animal production efficiency, whilst maintaining product quality and animal welfare and enhance EU food security to relevant stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-2 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2012

OPTIMISTIC is a proposal for a European collaborative project of doctors, scientists, relevant stakeholders (TREAT-NMD, patient organizations) and SMEs with the aim to improve clinical practice for patients suffering from a rare, inherited, and neglected disease, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). It is one of the most variable human diseases with complex, multi-systemic and progressively worsening clinical manifestations. Despite the huge impact of DM1 on the daily life of both patients and their family members, DM1 patients fail to receive the quality of healthcare that is available as they are not assertive users of the health care system. There is no cure for DM1. The aim of treatment is to relieve impairments, reduce limitations and support participation in everyday activities. Based on our DM1-specific model which shows that physical activity and experienced fatigue are main determinants of DM1 health status (Kalkman 2007), OPTIMISTIC investigates the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in combination with exercise training to improve functional capacity and to stimulate an active lifestyle. OPTIMISTIC compares the outcome of a treatment regimen with regular management in a multi-centre, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial, designed to 1) result in evidence-based clinical guidelines on exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy in DM1, 2) capture clinically meaningful changes in existing and novel outcome measures, and 3) identify both individual and composite biomarkers as surrogate treatment outcome measures that are reflective of the disease state. There is an urgent need for an European clinical trial infrastructure for DM1. High prioritization of this is required to enhance the speed of clinical development of new putative DM1 therapeutics approaching the market. OPTIMISTIC will provide this and safeguard the rapid uptake of the developed clinical guidelines ensuring improvements in DM1 care and quality of life.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: Fission-2010-3.2.1 | Award Amount: 7.04M | Year: 2011

Diagnostic radiation represents an indispensable, sometimes life-saving, tool in modern medicine. However, the growing use of computerized tomography (CT) is a topic of concern in radiological protection, especially for children and adolescents. Children are generally more sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation than adults. In addition, they have a longer life-span to express any effect and, because of their smaller mass, they may receive higher radiation doses from a CT scan than an adult. A large-scale multinational collaborative study will be set up with the objective of providing guidance towards optimisation of doses from paediatric CT scans. We have the following specific aims: 1) describe the pattern of use of CT in different countries and over time; 2) derive individual estimates of organ doses ; 3) assess biological markers of CT-irradiation effects; 4) directly evaluate radiation-related risk of cancer following CT; and 5) characterize the quality of CT images in relation to the estimated doses in order to better inform CT imaging practice. Scientists from nine European countries with expertise in epidemiology, clinical practice, radiology, dosimetry, biology and public health will contribute to the project with the objective of provide recommendations for a harmonized approach to CT dose optimisation for paediatric patients in Europe. Results of this research will serve to increase awareness of the scientific and medical communities about public health aspects related to the use of diagnostic radiation and to provide recommendations on the use of valuable diagnostic tools, with lowering the risk of its potential hazards as much as possible.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST-2007-1.1-04 | Award Amount: 21.92M | Year: 2009

The electric ship concept offers many benefits; among other aspects if offers flexibility of control and effectiveness of power transmission. But predominantly it enables higher energy conversion efficiency by ensuring that prime movers are effectively loaded at all times and across all operating conditions. This dominating advantage cannot be matched by mechanical transmission systems because gearboxes offer little chance of integrating a high number of prime movers in the restricted space of a ship whereas this integration is straight forward when managed electrically. Thus the electric ship concept offers reduced emissions through improved efficiency of engine operation but critically it offers significant reduced emissions during the critical phase of entry to littoral water when with speed generally reduced engines in a mechanical systems become very lightly loaded. It is proposed to enhance the electric ship concept so it suits a wider range of vessels than currently. The principal barrier to adoption of the electric ship concept in merchant ships is the size of the equipment. However if size reductions can be achieved then adopting the electric ship concept in a wider range of merchant ships will, as described above, reduce emissions and improve the impact on global warming. Overall this impact will be significant given the current and anticipated levels of global trade and the proportion to be moved by sea transport. This challenging ambition, to enable the adoption of the electric ship concept in a wider range of merchant ships, will demand the development of new technologies across all of marine electrical engineering: 1. High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS): This is a technology that allows smaller principal electrical components and an increase in efficiency. 2. Wireless monitoring: This provides simpler internal control communication and enables the adoption of more advanced control regimes (as offered by the electrification of propulsion). 3. Harbour Shore Electrical Supplies: Running lightly loaded generators in harbour - as is commonly the practice among merchant ship operators - threatens the environment in a sensitive zone. The lack of any propulsion load prevents loading the generators more effectively. The answer is to supply the ship with electricity from shore connections. This does not need technological innovation but the widespread adoption of shore supplies demands standardisation among connectors and mode of electrical supply that has yet to be investigated. 4. Electrical actuation: This is a technology which aims to replace mechanically actuated auxiliaries by using direct electrical actuators and reduces size, cost, maintenance and improves efficiency The benefits of these proposed innovations will be tested by developing designs for specific ship types: multi-purpose, cruise and container. The integration process will be composed of 6 steps: 1 Ship mission 2 Energy consumers 3 Draft design 4 Performance simulations 5 Final design 6 Environmental impact. To reduce costs only the design for the multi-purpose ship will be taken through all the six steps. The remaining 2 ship types will only be taken through steps 1 to 3. Finally, the innovative HTSC technology will be demonstrated in a land demonstrator, scaled as much as possible to reduce costs, while retaining relevance of the demonstration to full scale implementation. This demonstrator will include: the propulsion system, including an HTSC propulsion motor and its power converter, a DC distribution system with innovative protection and an HTSC segment, and various auxiliary loads.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SST-2007-6.0-03 | Award Amount: 800.62K | Year: 2008

Europe has a strong maritime economy with a high global position. The strength of the European maritime industry is based on its entrepreneurship and ability to innovate. The European maritime companies can only maintain their position to produce innovative products if they can attract highly qualified RTD personnel. In order to remain at the cutting edge of knowledge and technology for green, competitive, safe and secure advanced maritime products and operations not only naval architects, offshore and marine engineers but also marine scientists, marine transport economists and financiers as well as other related science and engineering graduates have to be attracted to undertake research and development in the maritime sector. PROMARC will raise awareness of job opportunities in the marine transport technology sector in Research and Innovative product development through: 1. An investigation and analysis of current National and European Union schemes to promote maritime transport sector. 2. Investigation and analysis of current and future sector skill shortage and demand 3. Creation of promotional materials on the research and innovation career opportunities in the maritime transport sector to be published online and as brochures and pamphlets for distribution by all sector stakeholders 4. Activities to promote of marine transport technology sector in schools including site visits, schools visits and interactive internet site. 5. Activities to attract graduates to a career in research including academic competitions, thematic workshops and summer schools It is recognised that there is a severe gender imbalance in the marine technology sector and special efforts will be targeted at female students to encourage them to follow research and innovation careers in the sector.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.4.1-10 | Award Amount: 16.21M | Year: 2009

Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports a link between chronic inflammation and cancer and indicates a role for inflammatory cells in the initiation, progression and metastasis of malignancy. The objective of the collaborative integrated project INFLA-CARE is to structure a European collective of scientific and technological excellence in the field of Inflammation & Cancer which will capitalise on the available expertise and develop effective anti-inflammatory strategies and novel agents for cancer prevention and treatment. The project will specifically seek to identify molecular and cellular targets for cancer therapy through the development and systematic study of state-of-the-art pre-clinical models of inflammation-driven cancer. By mobilising the outstanding research experience and technological capacities of the network participants, the program will accelerate the translation of knowledge obtained by basic research into new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies which will be used for the detection, prevention and improved management of several types of human cancer. INFLA-CARE will also ensure spreading of scientific excellence and dissemination of knowledge beyond the network, by encouraging innovation and transfer of knowledge and by raising public understanding of scientific and health issues. The impact of the program is therefore expected to be multi-dimensional, namely scientific, educational and innovation-related, enhancing European competitiveness and addressing major scientific issues and societal needs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-IRSES | Award Amount: 772.20K | Year: 2010

Genetic and epigenetic epidemiology are rapidly developing aspects of population-based health research that have clear translational potential. These endeavours both benefit considerably from extensive international collaborations. Establishing robust associations between genetic variation and common complex disease phenotypes requires very large sample sizes than can only realistically be generated through collaborative work. Furthermore, exploring associations in populations with different historical origins contributes to location of functional variation. Interactions of genetic variation and environmental exposures are best studied against a background of widely different environments, something that is best leveraged between, rather than within, countries. Epigenetic patterns are clearly influenced by exposures such as 1-carbon composition of the diet that differ between countries, allowing considerably greater power for establishing associations. Triangulating environmental exposures, genetic variation and epigenetic mediation offers to provide a step-change in ability to detect causal associations, of direct relevance to therapeutic and preventive activities. GeoCoDE will assemble a group of investigators who are custodians of world-leading population resources, have access to appropriate technologies and have been involved in advancing methods of data analysis. Through exchange visits of senior and junior research staff, workshops and extensive networking we will contribute to major advance in European capacity in this field.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.3 | Award Amount: 8.15M | Year: 2011

The design of innovative products and services that take advantage of Systems of Systems (SoS) technology is in its infancy. It is hampered by the complexity caused by the heterogeneity and independence of SoS constituent systems and the difficulty of communication between diverse stakeholders. The state of the art in SoS engineering lacks models and tools that help developers to make trade-off decisions during design and evolution, and assist in working out and recording precise contracts between constituents and the global SoS. This leads to sub-optimal design and expensive rework during integration and in service.\nCOMPASS will augment existing industry tools and practice with an underlying modelling language in which SoS architectures and contracts can be expressed. A formal semantic foundation the first to be developed specifically for SoS engineering will enable this language to support analysis of global SoS properties. The language and methods will be supported by an open, extendible tools platform with integrated prototype plug-ins for model construction, dynamic analysis by simulation and test automation, static analysis by model-checking and proof, and links to an established architectural modelling language (SysML). These strengthened foundations and tools will support enhanced methods guidelines that help users embed this new technology in industrial SoS practice.\nTechnical advances in COMPASS are focussed on industry needs evaluated through substantial industry-led case studies in three diverse and complementary areas. These will be augmented by challenge problems solicited from a range of SoS stakeholders and developer organisations through a special interest group. The open platform, tools plug-ins, semantics, development guidelines, industry case study experience and challenge problems will ensure that COMPASSs outputs can be readily exploited by SoS developers and stakeholders as well as in future research and development.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.8.0 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2011

CADMAD aims to make a foundational breakthrough in the way computers and computer-aided design and manufacturing is employed in DNA-based research and development, making a radically new use of information technologies in biology and biotechnology.Biology and biotechnology research involves DNA programming, which is akin to computer programming. Researchers modify and combine DNA of interest in a programmatic way to uncover its function, to improve its function, or to create new functions. Whereas the composition and editing of computer programs is as easy as using a word-processor, the design, construction and editing of DNA in a programmatic fashion is still a slow, expensive, labour-intensive wet-lab process.CADMADs vision is to replace the labour-intensive DNA processing carried out today by tens of thousands of skilled wet-lab workers around the world, by high-throughput computer-aided design and manufacturing of DNA, which would be fundamentally more efficient than plain de novo DNA synthesis by effectively reusing existing DNA. Computed-aided design and manufacturing of semiconductor chips has enabled the computer revolution, the Internet revolution, and the mobile phone revolution. Computer-aided design and manufacturing of DNA may similarly enable a revolution in biology and biotechnology, in which high-throughput computer-aided and robotically executed experiments replace manual wet-lab work, resulting in accelerated progress in key areas of research and development.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.1.1-3 | Award Amount: 17.32M | Year: 2011

Bacterial infection is the major cause of disability and death in children worldwide. We will use meningococcal disease (MD) as a model to understand genetic factors underlying susceptibility and severity of childhood bacterial infection which will then be applied to other childhood infections. We have established cohorts of patients with MD in Central and Southern Europe (CE,SE), UK and Africa as well as cohorts with other bacterial infections. We have established an inter-disciplinary team with expertise in Infectious Diseases, Immunogenetics, Bio-informatics, Microbiology, Public Health and Vaccinology including SME and industrial partners. We have already undertaken a genome wide study (GWAS) to identify genes causing susceptibility to meningococcal disease in a UK cohort. We identified complement factor H (fH) and fH-related (fHr) genes controlling MD susceptibility. This finding is fundamental to prevention as vaccines containing the MD fH receptor are undergoing trials. We will undertake GWAS on the CE, and SE MD cohorts, allowing meta analysis, and cross validation, and undertake GWAS on 2,500 Meningococcal Vaccine recipients. We will use next generation sequencing to identify the causal variants within the fH/fHr region and other regions implicated by pathway and severity analyses of the three MD GWAS and vaccine GWAS. We will match bacterial and host genetic variation and identify mechanisms of action of fH variants and other genes controlling susceptibility and severity using RNA expression, functional analyses and animal models. We will identify Mendelian defects and rare mutations as well as copy number variation and epi-genetic effects using next generation sequencing and RNA sequencing in extreme phenotype cohorts with MD , pneumococcal ,staphylococcal and salmonella disease. The study will identify mechanisms underlying susceptibility, provide new targets for treatment and prevention, and identify those at risk of disease or poor outcome.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH-2010-3.2-1 | Award Amount: 10.21M | Year: 2011

ALICE RAP is a Europe wide project of 43 partner research institutions involving 107 researchers from 25 European countries providing 1000 months of a plurality of scientific endeavour to analyse the place and challenges of addictions and lifestyles to the cohesion, organization and functioning of contemporary European society. Through integrated multidisciplinary research, a wide range of factors will be studied through a foresight approach to inform a redesign of effective addictions governance. Ownership will be described by an historical study of addiction through the ages, an analysis of public and private stakeholder views, and through image analyses, of professional and citizenship views. A study of how addictions are classified and defined will be followed by estimates of their health, social and economic impact. Determinants of addiction will be investigated through a coordinated and cohesive social, economic and biological analysis of initiation, transition into problem use and transition into and out of dependence. The business of addiction will be analyzed through studies of revenues, profits and participants in legal and illegal trade, the impact of suppliers on addictive substance use and behaviours, and analyses of webs of influence on policy responses. Addictions governance will be studied by describing the views and forces that determine the ways societies steer themselves and by stock taking of present governance practices to old and emerging addictions. Youth as customers will be analyzed through considering the impacts of new technologies on promoting and mitigating use, by studying the interrelations of culture and biology, and by determining features that promote resilience and nudge young people to reduce problematic use. The programme itself will be professionally managed from a partnership perspective to promote a coordinated and integrated approach to the high volume of research and its policy implications.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2011.4.1-3. | Award Amount: 4.88M | Year: 2011

D-RAIL will focus on freight traffic, identifying root causes of derailment of particular significance to freight vehicles, which have a wider range of operating parameters (as a result of the huge range in loads, speeds and maintenance quality) than passenger vehicles. One key question that will be studied is how independent minor faults (e.g., a slight track twist and a failing bearing) could combine to cause a derailment. D-RAIL will extend this study to include the expected demands on the rail freight system forecast for 2050, such as heavier axle loads, faster freight vehicle speeds for time-sensitive low volume high value high speed services (LVHVHS) goods, radically new vehicle designs, or longer train consists. A set of alarm limits will be specified which can be selected as appropriate by infrastructure managers, depending on local conditions. In tandem with the above analysis, current monitoring systems (both wayside and vehicle-mounted) and developing technologies will be assessed with respect to their ability to identify developing faults and potential dangers. Where current systems are shown to be deficient, the requirements for future monitoring systems will be specified. D-RAIL will also examine vehicle identification technologies, such as the standards- and interoperability-focussed RFID system being implemented by GS1 and Trafikverket. Integration of alarm limits, monitoring systems and vehicles across national borders and network boundaries will be examined and a deployment plan set out based on RAMS and LCC analyses. Procedures for applying speed limits to faulty vehicles, or taking them out of service, will be set out; this will include communication with the parties responsible for the transport of the freight and for maintenance of the vehicle. This will input to standards, regulations and international contracts. For field testing and validation, D-RAIL will have access to VUZs test track in the Czech Republic.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2007.6.1 | Award Amount: 905.02K | Year: 2008

This project aims to make public transport more user-friendly by facilitating seamless accessibility to different public transport networks.\nIn 2015 payment processes shall no longer be a barrier for the users of public transport.\nThe objective of the Interoperable Fare Management Project (IFM Project) is to provide travellers with common styles of contact-less media throughout Europe which can be used for multiple transport products in different geographic areas and for sustainable modal switching, such as the use of Park and Ride- unlike existing smartcards which are restricted to specific city or regional geographies.\nThe project is expected to significantly lower the barriers to mobility and encourage the use of public rather than private transport, contributing to a reduction of carbon emissions and a reduction or elimination of paper tickets, thus further enhancing the impact of smart media on environment and on the efficiency of public transport.\nIt will be possible to tailor the media to assist specific groups (e.g. existing concessionary travellers, benefit recipients or part-time workers) thereby supporting the Social Inclusion Agenda.\nThe project is based on delivering an ICT environment that supports nomadic passengers. It will be delivered through work packages covering trust modelling, privacy modelling, common applications and interoperable media, model of IFM organisations and supporting back office ICT system interfaces. It will be managed to ensure effective and efficient consensus and dissemination of best practice among all stakeholders.\nThe project is designed to provide world leadership in its segment and to deliver results which can be transferred to areas outside of the transportation sector world-wide. It will allow manufacturers and suppliers to offer the end-to-end, lossless nature of IFM the platform and transactions in other fields, thereby reducing time to market and lowering the cost of implementing other comparable schemes.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SiS-2009-1.2.1.1;SiS-2009-1.3.2.1 | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2010

PERARES strengthens public engagement in research (PER) by developing multi-annual action plans, involving researchers and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) in the formulation of research agendas and the research process. It uses debates on science to actively articulate research requests of civil society. These are forwarded to research institutes, and results are used in a next phase of the debate. Thus, these debates move upstream into agenda setting. For this, partners link existing debate formats with the science shop network already linking civil society and research institutes - and start a transnational web portal for debates. This is piloted on nanotechnology, then every few months a new debate starts. These are connected to the European reflection on the grand societal challenges for the future of the ERA. To be able to answer to research requests, it is necessary to enlarge and strengthen the network of research bodies doing research for/with CSOs. Thus, nine new science shop like facilities throughout Europe are started, mentored by experienced partners. Science shop-like work is advanced by adding studies on good practices to the available knowledge base and organising workshops. Guidelines to evaluate the impact of engagement activities are developed and tested. The partners pilot and assess alternative forms of agenda-setting dialogue between researchers and CSOs, e.g. long-term periodic meetings, and direct co-operations in two important social sciences fields: Roma/Travellers issues and domestic violence issues. The partners also investigate the potential role of higher education institutes and funding councils in supporting co-operation with CSOs. PERARES discusses its activities with the wider community through two large conferences and ongoing dissemination. Thus, through increased, better structured co-operation, more researchers and CSOs engage in incorporating needs, concerns and knowledge of civil society in research agendas.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: GC.NMP.2013-1 | Award Amount: 11.49M | Year: 2013

Li-ion technologies initiated in the 90 at a fast development pace thanks mainly to emerging ICTs with more than 20 GWh sold in 2010. Soon, it appeared as a credible technology for electrical vehicles as it could provide average energy densities of about 140 Wh/kg. However and since then,major breakthroughs have been expected to reach higher storage levels of 250 Wh/kg on battery system level with an acceptable lifetime of 3000 cycles in order to develop an affordable economical business plan for car batteries. MAT4BAT builds-up its EVs battery strategy on advanced materials and pilot line processes, proposing three novel concepts of cells initiating from a state-of-the art combination of cell materials (NMC/Carbonate liquid electrolyte/Graphite). MAT4BAT will address all critical ageing mechanisms associated to this technology and having direct impacts on product lifetime & safety by implementing two work programs for Battery Assessment (#1) and Battery Technologies (#2). Program #1 will set a framework to define critical charging modalities for a battery system during practical use and associated testing tools & methods for relevant functional performance & lifetime assessment. Within this framework, the program #2 will implement three generations of cells with a focus on electrolytes which will be steadily transformed from Liquid to Gel to All-Solid state electrolytes in order to promote substantial gain in cell lifetime and safety by preventing degradations and hazards and improving energy density with a separator-free cell (all-solid state electrolyte). 100 state-of-the-art commercial cells will be assessed to define normal and critical charge/discharge conditions of testing with appropriate testing protocols. Besides,materials increments will be screened out on coin-cells prior a benchmarking of most promising materials at full cells level. Eventually,(10-40 A.h) prototypes will be produced to validate MAT4BAT best technologies against quantified objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.5-2 | Award Amount: 7.93M | Year: 2012

Chronic inflammatory diseases of joints are major causes of disability in the ageing population. Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common types of arthritis and a major cause of pain and disability in older individuals. OA is expected to place a heavy burden on European healthcare systems, as European citizens grow older. Cartilage damage in OA is detected radiographically by decreases in joint space width (JSW). However, radiographic evidence is seen only after significant cartilage degradation has already taken place. The early stages of the disease may remain latent and asymptomatic for many years. Therefore, there is an acute need for reliable biomarkers and diagnostic tests that can facilitate earlier diagnosis of OA, and inform the prognosis, monitoring and therapeutic strategies for chronic and disabling forms of this disease. However, there is currently a lack of reliable, quantifiable and easily measured biomarkers that provide an earlier diagnosis of OA, inform on the prognostic of the disease and monitor and predict responses to therapeutic modalities. Biomarkers of tissue turnover in joints can reflect disease relevant biological activity and provide valuable information that may be useful diagnostically and therapeutically, potentially enabling a more rational and personalized approach to healthcare management. The proliferation of omic technologies has facilitated rapid progress in biomarker research. Combinations of omic technologies are dominating the biomarker research arena and are playing increasingly important roles in the identification, validation and qualification of new biomarkers. The aim of the D-BOARD consortium is to bring together leading academic institutions and European Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) to focus on the identification, validation and qualification of new combination biomarkers and the development of diagnostic tests capable of subclinical disease diagnosis for degenerative and inflammatory diseases of joints.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2011.1.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 4.24M | Year: 2011

In an interdisciplinary, socially inclusive and collaborative context, emBRACE aims to improve the framing of resilience in the context of disasters in Europe. It will develop a conceptual and methodological approach to clarify how the resilience capacity of a society confronted with natural hazards and disasters can be characterized, defined and measured. On the basis of a systematic evaluation of the widest literature base, the project will first elaborate an initial conceptual framework. Disaster footprints and a review of current data gaps and challenges for human impacts and development databases in providing resilience data on regional and national levels will help inform indicator development. These will then be tested and ground truthed by means of 6 well-chosen case studies across Europe exposed to different natural hazards, situated in different governance settings and socio-demographic-economic contexts. Resilience will be contextualised through the application and evaluation of newly developed indicators and models, and will contribute to reformulation and adaption of the conceptual framework. emBRACE will considerably advance the methodologies for evaluating, modeling and assessing resilience of different actors. emBRACE will be methodologically rich, drawing on partner expertise across the research methods spectrum. It will apply these methods across scales from local to European. Stakeholders and experts will be incorporated into knowledge-sharing groups. There will be ongoing engagement with these stakeholders alongside programmed consultations during the development of the framework and model, case study work, and the reshaping of concepts, guidelines and database requirements for disasters and societal resilience. A key difference in emBRACE is the seeking out of people and groups not normally included in such fora; not as subjects of research but as partners in research and experts in their own right.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Life expectancies in developed countries are projected to continue increasing, with women's life expectancy potentially surpassing 90 years old in South Korea by 2030, according to a study published in The Lancet. The study predicts life expectancy is likely to be highest in South Korea (90.8 years old), France (88.6 years old) and Japan (88.4 years old) for women, and in South Korea (84.1 years old), Australia (84.0 years old) and Switzerland (84.0 years old) for men. The researchers advise that increasing life expectancies will have major implications for health and social services that will need to adapt and will require policies to support healthy ageing, increase investment in health and social care, and possibly changes to retirement age. "As recently as the turn of the century, many researchers believed that life expectancy would never surpass 90 years," said lead author Professor Majid Ezzati, Imperial College London, UK. "Our predictions of increasing lifespans highlight our public health and healthcare successes. However, it is important that policies to support the growing older population are in place. In particular, we will need to both strengthen our health and social care systems and to establish alternative models of care such as technology-assisted home care." [1] In the study, researchers used a statistical technique used in weather forecasting to determine their projections and how certain they are. They developed 21 models to predict life expectancy in 35 developed countries - unlike most life expectancy projections which are based on a single model - and combined the results from these models based on how well they performed. All the predictions in the study come with a range of uncertainty. For instance, there is a 90% probability that life expectancy for South Korean women in 2030 will be higher than 86.7 years, and a 57% probability that it will be higher than 90 years. Although life expectancy is predicted to increase across all 35 countries, the extent of the increase varies by country. Comparing 2030 and 2010 life expectancies, female life expectancy is projected to increase most in South Korea, Slovenia and Portugal (6.6, 4.7 and 4.4 years, respectively). While for men life expectancy will increase most in Hungary, South Korea and Slovenia (7.5, 7.0 and 6.4 years). Life expectancy is predicted to increase least in Macedonia, Bulgaria, Japan and the USA (1.4, 1.5, 1.8 and 2.1 years) for women, and in Macedonia, Greece and Sweden and the USA (2.4, 2.7, 3.0 and 3.0 years) for men. The USA is predicted to see relatively small improvements in life expectancy (from 81.2 for in 2010 to 83.3 in 2030 for women and 76.5 to 79.5 for men). US life expectancy is already lower than most other high-income countries, and is expected to fall further behind in 2030, potentially as a result of its large inequalities, absence of universal health insurance and of the country having the highest homicide rate, body mass index (BMI) and death rates for children and mothers of all high-income countries. Conversely, South Korea's projected gains may be the result of continued improvements in economic status which has improved nutrition for children, access to healthcare and medical technology across the whole population. This has resulted in fewer deaths from infections and better prevention and treatment for chronic diseases, in a way that is more equitable than some Western countries. As well as calculating life expectancy at birth in 2030, the researchers projected how long those aged 65 years were likely to live in 2030. They found that women were likely to live an additional 24 years in 11 of the 35 countries, and that 65-year old men were likely to an additional 20 years in 22 countries [2] - illustrating that older populations are likely to continue growing across the developed world. With an ageing population it will be important to help people to age healthily and ease the impact of an ageing population on health systems through programmes that support healthy lifestyles and detect and treat diseases early. Providing assistive technology could also help older people remain in their homes by compensating for loss of mobility and senses, while building communities that are more accessible and providing good transportation services could help older people access amenities while staying in their community for longer. The social implications of this change will also likely require changes to pensions and retirement, with further payments of social security and pensions needed to support those living longer. As a result, the researchers propose changes to working practice through changing retirement age or creating schemes that allow a gradual transition to retirement. "Dealing with an ageing population will require a combination of strengthening and positioning our health and social care systems and our societies as a whole, so as to ensure that people age healthily, continue to contribute to society for longer, and receive appropriate pension and care once they age." said Professor Ezzati. [1] The researchers explain that the next step of their research will be to extend their model to specific diseases as well as to all countries to provide more accurate predictions of life expectancy globally. The study cannot take into account unprecedented events, such as major political change that affects social and health system determinants of health, in its forecasts because the effects of such events are unknown or highly uncertain. Writing in a linked Comment, Dr Ailiana Santosa, Umeå University, Sweden, said: "Countries are moving towards universal health coverage. Forecasting life expectancy at birth and at age 65 years can help governments and health services to make the right investments in health, such as averting deaths due to infectious diseases and reducing maternal and child mortality. Achieving universal health coverage is worthy, plausible, and needs to be continued." The study was funded by the UK Medical Research Council and the US Environmental Protection Agency. It was conducted by scientists from Imperial College London, the World Health Organisation, Northumbria University and the University of Washington. [1] Quote direct from author and cannot be found in the text of the Article. [2] The projected life expectancy for those aged over 65 in 2030 is higher than for those born in 2030 because the figure for those born in 2030 includes people who will die before the age of 65, which makes the life expectancy average lower. For interviews with author, Professor Majid Ezzati, Imperial College London, UK, please contact Kate Wighton, Research Media Officer at Imperial College London, on: E) k.wighton@imperial.ac.uk / press.office@imperial.ac.uk T) +44 (0)20 7594 2410 For interviews with Comment author, Dr Ailiana Santosa, Umeå University, Sweden, please contact E) ailiana.santosa@umu.se T) +46 738099213 A podcast interview is available, please see: http://press.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST.2010.5.2-2. | Award Amount: 9.35M | Year: 2011

A sustainable and efficient freight transport in Europe plays a vital role in having a successful and competitive economy. Freight transport is expected to grow by some 50 % (in tonne-kilometres) by 2020. However rail has, in many areas, been displaced from a dominant position as road transport services have grown and developed in capability and levels of sophistication that have not been matched by rail service providers. SUSTRAIL aims to contribute to the rail freight system to allow it to regain position and market and the proposed solution is based on a combined improvement in both freight vehicle and track components in a holistic approach aimed at achieving a higher reliability and increased performance of the rail freight system as a whole and profitability for all the stakeholders. The SUSTRAIL integrated approach is based on innovations in rolling stock and freight vehicles (with a targeted increased in speed and axle-load) combined with innovations in the track components (for higher reliability and reduced maintenance), whose benefits to freight and passenger users (since mixed routes are considered) are quantified through the development of an appropriate business case with estimation of cost savings on a life cycle basis. In fact, a holistic approach to vehicle and track sustainability has to be taken, since improvements in track design and materials alone are not enough as demands on the rail system increase. Contributions from the different topic areas (vehicles, track, operations) will be demonstrated on real routes, offering geographic dispersion as well as differences in type, speed, and frequency of traffic. A strong multidisciplinary consortium committed to concrete actions aligned toward a common outcome has been grouped for the achievement of the challenging objectives of the project with a balanced combination of Infrastructure managers, freight operators and Industry, including Large and Small enterprises, with support from Academia.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST.2012.1.1-3. | Award Amount: 6.95M | Year: 2012

MERLINs main aim and purpose is to investigate and demonstrate the viability of an integrated management system to achieve a more sustainable and optimised energy usage in European electric mainline railway systems. MERLIN will provide an integrated optimisation approach that includes multiple elements, dynamic forecasting supply-demand scenarios and cost considerations to support operational decisions leading to a cost-effective intelligent management of energy and resources through: Improved design of existing and new railway distribution networks and electrical systems as well as their interfaces with the public grid and considering network interconnections Better understanding of the influence on energy demand of operations and operational procedures of the different elements of the railway system Identification of technologies and solutions able to further contribute to the optimisation of energy usage More efficient traction energy supply based on optimised use of resources Understanding of the cross-dependency between these different technological solutions to define optimum combinations for optimised energy usage Improving cost effectiveness of the overall railway system Contribution to European standardisation (TecRec) MERLIN will also deliver the interface protocol and the architecture for energy management systems in the railway domain, combining the technical development with new business model that would enable and foster their application.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-14-2015 | Award Amount: 16.00M | Year: 2016

VISION-DMD aims to advance clinical development of the orphan drug VBP15 as a new therapy to revolutionise care for all patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by 2020, in line with IRDiRC goals. DMD is an incurable, rare muscle wasting disease; boys progressively weaken, lose ambulation and death occurs by early adulthood. Corticosteroids (CS) are widely recognised to increase muscle strength and delay disease progression but global acceptance as standard of care is very variable due to severe side effects. VBP15 is an innovative steroid-like drug designed to retain or better CS efficacy and improve membrane stabilization with reduced or no side effects. VBP15 will increase the therapeutic window to slow disease progression and improve quality of life and lifespan for all DMD patients. Building on positive preclinical and Phase 1 results funded by government grants and international patient groups and based on FDA and EMA advice, VISION-DMD proposes a Phase 2 registration directed clinical programme aimed at an affordable therapy: Phase 2a will study the safety and tolerability of ascending doses of VBP15 in ambulant DMD boys; Phase 2b will demonstrate the efficacy and safety of two doses of VBP15 in young ambulant DMD boys. Both studies will be followed by extension studies for long term safety and efficacy data collection leading to cumulative exposure of up to 2100 drug months. The project proposes the Time to Stand Test as a highly relevant and reliable primary endpoint. Innovative exploratory serum biomarkers and novel wide scale MRI techniques will be used to investigate the VBP15 pharmacodynamics and the effect on muscle cellular pathology. VBP15 will meet the unmet need for better treatment for DMD with widespread acceptance and potentially be used in combination with stratified therapies as they are developed. The Consortium links the leading networks TREAT-NMD and CINRG with ECRIN-ERIC, for trial delivery and regulatory undertakings in Europe/US


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.49M | Year: 2008

In 2004 an estimated 5 billion passenger journeys will be made in the UK, France and Germany and the market in the three countries is worth approximately 40 billion. [Ref. 1] . Based on the extrapolation of data relating to the UK, French and German railways [Ref 1], the 500,000 kms of rail [Ref. 2] on the European rail network has an average estimated 5000 rail breaks annually with about 1500 due to weld failure. Although the number of weld failures is relatively small compared to the estimated 11 million alumino-thermic welds on the European network, it still accounts for about 20% of the total 7000\ rail failures each year [Ref. 3]. There is no current available NDT method for the economic and reliable volumetric examination of alumino-thermic welds. This proposal describes the development of a rapid ultrasonic method for the safe and reliable NDT examination of the entire volume of in-situ alumino-thermic welds. The proposed ultrasonic system could be quickly deployed on track using a clamp-on device. The inspection scans will be carried out in a pre-determined sequence, and then the results compared with defect acceptance criteria that will be generated in the project. To achieve this objective, a rigorous analysis of the material properties, the defect interaction with the ultrasonic beams and the design of optimum scanning procedures will first be carried out. It is expected that the scans will be implemented by means of electronic scanning using novel phased arrays and multiple probes. The acceptance criteria will be generated by both Engineering Critical Assessment and fatigue tests on rail samples.


Parkinsons disease (PD) is a major, chronic, non-communicable disease and the 2nd most frequent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Excess iron is primarily detected in the substantia nigra pars compacta, where dopaminergic neurons are exposed to high levels of oxidative stress produced by mitochondrial disorders and dopamine metabolism. Our previous preclinical, translational and pilot clinical studies demonstrated that novel iron chelation therapy with the prototypic drug deferiprone (DFP) (i) induces neuroprotection in cell models of PD via a powerful antioxidant effect, (ii) reduces regional siderosis of the brain, (iii) reduces motor handicap via inhibition of catechol-o-methyl transferase, and (iv) slows the progression of motor handicap in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model and in early PD patients. This project now seeks to demonstrate that conservative iron chelation therapy with moderate-dose DFP (30 mg/kg/day) slows the progression of handicap in de novo PD patients while not affecting systemic parameters. The 9-month, parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial will be followed by a 1-month wash-out period. The primary efficacy criterion will be the change in motor and non-motor handicap scores on the Total Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinsons Disease Rating Scale to identify disease-modifying and symptomatic effects. The secondary efficacy criterion will be the change in score between baseline and 40 weeks (i.e. probing the disease-modifying effect only). Potential surrogate radiological and biological biomarkers, health economics and societal impacts will be assessed. 17 national, European and international research and innovation activities will be linked with the project. The study results should prompt academic and industrial research on iron chelation as a disease-modifying treatment in neurodegenerative diseases.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SST.2013.2-2. | Award Amount: 15.00M | Year: 2013

In 2011, the White Paper on European Transport reasserted how fundamental transport was for society, for the mobility of European citizens and for the growth and vitality of the European economy. CAPACITY4RAIL will deliver research that is innovative, prepares rail for the future and takes into account results from previous research projects and programmes. The project builds on previous useable results and will deliver both technical demonstrations and system wide guidelines and recommendations that will be the basis for future research and investment, increasing the capacities of rail networks in the future. The time used for infrastructure monitoring, maintenance and renewal means down time. New concepts for low maintenance infrastructure, using standardized and plug-and-play concepts will be proposed. Non-intrusive innovative monitoring techniques or self-monitoring infrastructure will be investigated, allowing low or no impact on train operations. The fragility of some key component of the infrastructure system (especially in extreme weather conditions) such as switches may impact the efficiency of the whole system. The resilience of switches to any kind of known failure will be reinforced, as well as the ability of the operation system to recover from incidents. Capacity enhancements will also be achieved by higher speed freight vehicles, allowing an optimized interleaving of freight trains into mixed traffic, and improved planning models for operation. Intermodal integration within the global transport system will be improved through enhanced transhipment of passengers and freight. CAPACITY4RAIL will also look towards 2030/2050, by proposing guidelines for future deployments in the mid-term, recommendations for technologies to de developed and deployed in the long term and investigating the key opportunities for funding these within national and EU funding schemes.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2012.1.1-3 | Award Amount: 2.75M | Year: 2013

The aim of SmartSpec is to provide substance, guidance and practical support to the EU Smart Specialisation Platform, based on the combination of leading academic and practical expertise present in the consortium. The goal is directed at operationalising the concept of smart specialisation in a manner which will be useful to actors in different regional contexts. It will do this by strengthening the analytical underpinnings of the smart specialisation concept, providing methodological guidance for practice and generating strategic intelligence for policy-makers. Through an integrated, multi-dimensional and place-based approach focused on 8 Work Packages, SmartSpec develops robust practical and analytical findings to strengthen the implementation of smart specialisation strategies. With a strong emphasis on knowledge exchange and facilitated learning, SmartSpec will deliver useful results to inform practitioners and policymakers in the development and assessment of smart specialisation strategies, whilst extending the state of the art.


The proposed integrating project LOWINPUTBREEDS aims to develop integrated LIVESTOCK BREEDING and MANAGEMENT strategies to improve ANIMAL HEALTH, product QUALITY and PERFORMANCE in European organic and low input milk, meat and egg production through research, dissemination and training activities. The consortium includes 11 academic centres of excellence and 6 genetics/breeding companies (4 SMEs) in 11 European, 2 ICPC and 2 industrialised third countries. The proposed project has 4 main Science and Technology OBJECTIVES: 1. To DEVELOP and evaluate INNOVATIVE BREEDING CONCEPTS, including (a) genome wide and (b) marker assisted selection, and (c) cross-, (d) flower- and (e) farmer participatory breeding strategies, which will deliver genotypes with robustness and quality traits required under low input conditions. The project will focus on 5 LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION SYSTEMS (dairy cows, dairy and meat sheep, pigs and laying hens) and design SPECIES-SPECIFIC BREEDING STRATEGIES for different macroclimatic regions in Europe. 2. To INTEGRATE the use of IMPROVED GENOTYPES with INNOVATIVE MANAGEMENT approaches including improved diets, feeding regimes and rearing systems. This will focus on issues (e.g. mastitis and parasite control, animal welfare problems) where breeding or management innovations alone are unlikely to provide satisfactory solutions. 3. To IDENTIFY potential ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL, GENETIC DIVERSITY and ETHICAL IMPACTS of project deliverables to ensure they conform to different societal priorities and consumer demands/expectations and are acceptable to producers. 4. To ESTABLISH an efficient TRAINING and DISSEMINATION programme aimed at rapid exploitation and application of project deliverables by the organic and low input livestock industry.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-35-2014 | Award Amount: 1.56M | Year: 2015

CREA aims to promote ICT development and creativity as new drivers able to produce specific structural changes and arrangements in the European entrepreneurial base, to influence the future paths of social change and innovation to a large extent. CREA project wants to validate a new European Model of Summer Academy for students who wants to develop business ideas focus on creativity and ICT and able to explore innovation in advanced fields: new products for new markets, social innovation, meaning drive innovation in old sectors, service innovation, technology driven innovation etc. CREA will test 2 edition of Summer Academy simultaneously organized in 6 European Cities (Milan, Stuttgart, Ljubljana, Newcastle, Tallin, Utrecht), which will end with an international event (CREA ICT Business Idea Contest) for the presentation of results to international investors and the awarding of a prize. The project includes training courses, mentoring activities and the incubation program for start up companies that will be able to use the opportunities of ICT and Creativity to propose new business model with a European vision. The general objectives of CREA project are: - To create European wide system of Summer Academies for university and last year high school students entirely focused on ICT entrepreneurship; - To create a model of Summer Academy action oriented with a strong focus on ICT and entrepreneurial skills development and a rich offer of mentoring, support for business planning, matchmaking opportunities and generation of ICT related business idea; - To stimulate the development of new start up business ideas boosting on ICT and creativity; - To complement and extend similar existing Summer Academy program while strongly focusing on ICT and creativity entrepreneurship; - To organize and promote ICT Business Idea Contests.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-20-2015 | Award Amount: 6.91M | Year: 2016

Strength2Food is a 5-year, 6.9 million project to improve the effectiveness of EU food quality schemes (FQS), public sector food procurement (PSFP) and to stimulate Short Food Supply Chains (SFSC) through research, innovation and demonstration activities. Our 30-partner consortium representing 11 EU and 4 non-EU countries combines leading academic, communication, SME and stakeholder organisations to ensure a multi-actor approach. It will undertake case study-based quantitative research to measure economic, environmental and social impacts of FQS, PSFP and SFSC. The impact of PSFP policies on balanced nutrition in schools will also be assessed. Primary research will be complemented by advanced econometric analysis of existing datasets to determine impacts of FQS and SFSC participation on farm performance and survival, as well as understand price transmission and trade patterns. Consumer knowledge, confidence in, valuation and use of FQS labels and products will be assessed via cross-national survey, ethnographic and virtual supermarket-based research. Lessons from the research will be applied and verified in 6 pilot initiatives, focusing on less-developed and transition regions. These initiatives bring together academic and non-academic stakeholder partners in action research. The six pilot actions are: a school meals initiative to improve the nutritional outcomes and economic benefits for local agri-food producers; in-store trials (undertaken with a grocery retailer) to upscale sales of local produce; a scheme to stimulate a sustainable SFSC that adds value to the fishing community; and pilot actions to expand regional food labelling; increase sales of FQS products in non-traditional markers; and improve returns to local producers at food fairs and farmers markets (via a smartphone app). Project impact will be maximised through a knowledge exchange platform, hybrid forums, school educational resources, a Massive Open Online Course and practitioner recommendations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2013.5-1. | Award Amount: 4.62M | Year: 2013

The transportation industry has for a long time been engaged in the application of new lightweight materials for primary structural design in an effort to develop more energy efficient structures to meet low emissions targets without compromising public safety. This is also true for the rail industry, but the implementation of new lightweight materials has been slow mainly due to the lack of suitable certification procedures addressing the specific operational requirements of a railway vehicle. Such procedures are necessary so that rail vehicle manufacturers and operators can be confident that rolling stock made of a new material will perform as intended and will be at least as safe as a vehicle made out of the material it replaces. The REFRESCO project aims to achieve this goal by creating the regulatory framework for the use of new structural materials in rail car bodies. The existing certification procedures will be analysed, gaps identified and test and assessment methodologies for both isotropic and orthotropic materials will be developed. It is expected that the output from REFRESCO will accelerate the implementation of new materials in transport applications improve the competitiveness of transport industries, ensure sustainable, efficient and affordable transport services will be available and will create new skills and job opportunities through research and development in new material technologies.


Askins K.,Northumbria University | Pain R.,Durham University
Environment and Planning D: Society and Space | Year: 2011

Recent debates around urban encounter, integration cosmopolitanism, and renewed engagement with contact theory have raised questions about the spaces of interaction that may enable meaningful encounters between different social groups. Reflecting on a participatory art project with young people of African and British heritage in northeast England, we argue that discussion and practice around participatory action research, including the deployment of contact zones as theory and method, can cast some light on what fosters transformative spaces. Through analysis of two different approaches to community art used in the project, we show how elements of each enabled and disabled meaningful interaction between young people. We draw attention to the materiality of art (the tools) within participatory practices (the doing of it) in contributing to a space where interactions might take place, emphasising a complex interplay across/between actors, materials, and space that frames encounters as emergent, transitory, fragile, and yet hopeful. We examine the potential of a focus on the material in thinking beyond moments of encounter to how transformative social relations may be 'scaled up' before considering the implications for research and policy. © 2011 Pion Ltd and its Licensors.


Lee R.,Durham University | Howard J.A.K.,Durham University | Probert M.R.,Northumbria University | Steed J.W.,Durham University
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2014

This tutorial review looks at structural and supramolecular chemistry of molecular solids under extreme conditions, and introduces the instrumentation and facilities that enable single crystal diffraction studies on molecular crystals at both high pressure and low temperature. The equipment used for crystallography under extreme conditions is explored, particularly pressure cells such as the diamond anvil cell, and their mechanism of action, as well as the cryogenic apparatus which allows materials to be cooled to significantly low temperatures. The review also covers recent advances in the structural chemistry of molecular solids under extreme conditions with an emphasis on the use of single crystal crystallography in high pressure and low temperature environments to probe polymorphism and supramolecular interactions. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Biswas S.,Northumbria University | Lunec J.,Northumbria University | Bartlett K.,Royal Infirmary
Cancer and Metastasis Reviews | Year: 2012

Cancer biologists seem to have overlooked tumor metabolism in their research endeavors over the last 80 years of the last century, only to have rediscovered Warburg (Warburg et al. 1930; Warburg, Science 123(3191):309-314, 1956) within the first decade of the twenty-first century, as well as to suggest the importance of other, non-glucose-dependent, metabolic pathways such as such as fatty acid de novo synthesis and catabolism (β-oxidation) (Mashima et al.; Br J Cancer 100:1369-1372, 2009) and glutamine catabolism (glutaminolysis) (DeBerardinis et al.; Proc Nat Acad Sci 104(49):19345-19350, 2007). These non-glucose metabolic pathways seem to be just as important as the Warburg effect, if not potentially more so in human cancer. The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of fatty acid metabolism in cancer cells and, where necessary, identify gaps in current knowledge and postulate hypothesis based upon findings in the cellular physiology of metabolic diseases and normal cells. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Prince M.I.,Royal Infirmary | Ducker S.J.,Northumbria University | James O.F.W.,Northumbria University
Gut | Year: 2010

Objective: The aetiology of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is largely unknown. Previous studies have indicated that both environmental and genetic risk factors may be important. Design: We undertook a large case-control study to study possible risk factors in more detail. All patients were sent postal questionnaires on risk factors. Patients: We identified two sets of PBC cases from a geographically defined epidemiology study (epidemiological cases) and from a survey of the national patient support group (Foundation cases). Controls were selected from the electoral roll in strata matched to epidemiological cases by quartiles of age and sex. Results: Analysable questionnaires were received from 318 epidemiological cases, 2258 Foundation cases and 2438 controls. Statistically significant associations were seen with smoking (OR=1.63 (95% CI, 1.27 to 2.09)), epidemiological cases versus controls (1.57 (1.39 to 1.78)), Foundation cases versus controls, hair dye use (1.37 (0.98 to 1.80)), 1.25 (1.07 to 1.46)), and with previous histories of psoriasis (1.90 (1.21 to 1.91), 2.33 (1.03 to 1.73)), urinary infections (2.06 (1.56 to 0.1.73), 1.80 (1.54 to 2.11)), and shingles (2.38 (1.82 to 3.11), 1.23 (1.08 to 1.43)) and previous autoimmune diseases. Alcohol consumption was negatively associated with PBC (0.57 (0.39 to 0.83), 0.73 (0.61 to 0.79)). We did not identify any associations with obstetric risk factors except a previous history of obstetric cholestasis (2.13 (1.25 to 3.59), 2.20 (1.61 to 3.03)). Conclusion: We have confirmed that among environmental risk factors, smoking and the use of some cosmetics as well as urinary infections appear important. Among possible genetic risk factors a family history of PBC is a strong association and that a previous history of obstetric cholestasis as another putative 'genetic' risk.


Mendelow A.D.,Northumbria University | Gregson B.A.,Northumbria University | Rowan E.N.,Northumbria University | Murray G.D.,University of Edinburgh | And 2 more authors.
The Lancet | Year: 2013

Background The balance of risk and benefit from early neurosurgical intervention for conscious patients with superficial lobar intracerebral haemorrhage of 10-100 mL and no intraventricular haemorrhage admitted within 48 h of ictus is unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that early surgery compared with initial conservative treatment could improve outcome in these patients. Methods In this international, parallel-group trial undertaken in 78 centres in 27 countries, we compared early surgical haematoma evacuation within 12 h of randomisation plus medical treatment with initial medical treatment alone (later evacuation was allowed if judged necessary). An automatic telephone and internet-based randomisation service was used to assign patients to surgery and initial conservative treatment in a 1:1 ratio. The trial was not masked. The primary outcome was a prognosis-based dichotomised (favourable or unfavourable) outcome of the 8 point Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) obtained by questionnaires posted to patients at 6 months. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN22153967. Findings 307 of 601 patients were randomly assigned to early surgery and 294 to initial conservative treatment; 298 and 291 were followed up at 6 months, respectively; and 297 and 286 were included in the analysis, respectively. 174 (59%) of 297 patients in the early surgery group had an unfavourable outcome versus 178 (62%) of 286 patients in the initial conservative treatment group (absolute difference 3·7% [95% CI -4·3 to 11·6], odds ratio 0·86 [0·62 to 1·20]; p=0·367). Interpretation The STICH II results confirm that early surgery does not increase the rate of death or disability at 6 months and might have a small but clinically relevant survival advantage for patients with spontaneous superficial intracerebral haemorrhage without intraventricular haemorrhage. © 2013 Mendelow et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY-NC-ND.


Sherratt T.N.,Carleton University | Roberts G.,Northumbria University
Science | Year: 2012

Cooperation now has many solutions, but recent work shows how two well-known mechanisms interact.


Pitceathly R.D.S.,King's College London | McFarland R.,Northumbria University
Current Opinion in Neurology | Year: 2014

Purpose of review: The clinical and genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial myopathies presents considerable diagnostic challenges. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction seems to contribute to the development and progression of many age-related neurodegenerative diseases. This review presents recently published data concerning prevalence, phenotype, gene discovery, disease mechanisms, diagnostic tools and treatment strategies for mitochondrial diseases, and summarizes current understanding concerning the role mitochondria play in the pathogenesis of other common neurological disorders. Recent findings: Heteroplasmic levels of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations are common amongst the general population, although there is considerable geographic variation. Mitochondrial abnormalities also occur in common neurodegenerative disorders, implying a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction and development or progression of disease. The phenotypic spectrum associated with well recognized pathogenic variants continues to expand, whereas next-generation sequencing is identifying new disease-causing nuclear genetic mutations. Biomarkers and imaging modalities for diagnosis and disease monitoring are now in place and novel treatment strategies are emerging. Alas, no clinical trial data for treatment in mitochondrial disease have been published in the last 12 months. Summary: Despite rapid advances in gene discovery, details concerning the altered protein products and cellular pathways that result in mitochondrial disease remain elusive. Understanding the consequences of deleterious mutations and the cellular adaptive response is imperative so that therapeutic targets can be identified. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.


Nettle D.,Northumbria University | Frankenhuis W.E.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Rickard I.J.,Durham University
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2013

Many studies in humans have shown that adverse experience in early life is associated with accelerated reproductive timing, and there is comparative evidence for similar effects in other animals. There are two different classes of adaptive explanation for associations between early-life adversity and accelerated reproduction, both based on the idea of predictive adaptive responses (PARs). According to external PAR hypotheses, early-life adversity provides a 'weather forecast' of the environmental conditions into which the individual will mature, and it is adaptive for the individual to develop an appropriate phenotype for this anticipated environment. In internal PAR hypotheses, early-life adversity has a lasting negative impact on the individual's somatic state, such that her health is likely to fail more rapidly as she gets older, and there is an advantage to adjusting her reproductive schedule accordingly. We use a model of fluctuating environments to derive evolveability conditions for acceleration of reproductive timing in response to early-life adversity in a long-lived organism. For acceleration to evolve via the external PAR process, early-life cues must have a high degree of validity and the level of annual autocorrelation in the individual's environment must be almost perfect. For acceleration to evolve via the internal PAR process requires that early-life experience must determine a significant fraction of the variance in survival prospects in adulthood. The two processes are not mutually exclusive, and mechanisms for calibrating reproductive timing on the basis of early experience could evolve through a combination of the predictive value of early-life adversity for the later environment and its negative impact on somatic state. © 2013 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.


Cunliffe M.,Marine Biological Association of The United Kingdom | Upstill-Goddard R.C.,Northumbria University | Murrell J.C.,University of Warwick
FEMS Microbiology Reviews | Year: 2011

Aquatic surface microlayers are unique microbial ecosystems found at the air-water interface of all open water bodies and are often referred to as the neuston. Unambiguous interpretation of the microbiology of aquatic surface microlayers relies on robust sampling, for which several methods are available. All have particular advantages and disadvantages that make them more or less suited to this task. A key feature of surface microlayers is their role in regulating air-water gas exchange, which affords them a central role in global biogeochemistry that is only now being fully appreciated. The microbial populations in surface microlayers can impact air-water gas exchange through specific biogeochemical processes mediated by particular microbial groups such as methanotrophs or through more general metabolic activity such as the balance of primary production vs. heterotrophy. There have been relatively few studies of surface microlayers that have utilized molecular ecology techniques. The emerging consensus view is that aquatic surface microlayers are aggregate-enriched biofilm environments containing complex microbial communities that are ecologically distinct from those present in the subsurface water immediately below. Future research should focus on unravelling the complex interactions between microbial diversity and the ecosystem function of surface microlayers in order to better understand the important but complex role of microorganisms in Earth system processes. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.


Munn D.H.,Georgia Regents University | Mellor A.L.,Northumbria University
Trends in Immunology | Year: 2016

Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has immunoregulatory roles associated with tryptophan metabolism. These include counter-regulation (controlling inflammation) and acquired tolerance in T cells. Recent findings reveal that IDO can be triggered by innate responses during tumorigenesis, and also by attempted T cell activation, either spontaneous or due to immunotherapy. Here we review the current understanding of mechanisms by which IDO participates in the control of inflammation and in peripheral tolerance. Focusing on the tumor microenvironment, we examine the role of IDO in response to apoptotic cells and the impact of IDO on Treg cell function. We discuss how the counter-regulatory and tolerogenic functions of IDO can be targeted for cancer immunotherapy and present an overview of the current clinical progress in this area. IDO can be induced in the tumor microenvironment by the spontaneous inflammation and T cell activation associated with many tumors; however, IDO may also be induced reactively, in response to inflammation induced by antitumor immunotherapy.IDO is rapidly induced when mice are challenged with apoptotic cells. Inhibiting or genetically deleting IDO results in loss of self-tolerance to apoptotic cell-associated antigens, and susceptibility to lupus-like autoimmunity.DNA-containing nanoparticles can induce immunosuppressive IDO via a pathway dependent on the STING sensor of cytosolic DNA.When Treg cells are activated in the presence of IDO, they upregulate a highly suppressive phenotype driven by the PTEN lipid phosphatase. In vivo, challenge with apoptotic cells triggers IDO-mediated induction of PTEN-expressing Treg cells.In tumors, IDO induction by apoptotic cells may become relevant as the tumor attempts to inhibit immune responses to dying tumor cells following chemotherapy or immunotherapy. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.4.2-7 | Award Amount: 3.58M | Year: 2008

The effectiveness of treatment with oral anticoagulants in the prevention of thrombotic disorders is well established, but these drugs are potentially dangerous because of their narrow therapeutic index. In Europe three coumarins are used: warfarin, acenocoumarol, and phenprocoumon. Genetic factors that have been recently demonstrated to change the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of coumarins are the presence of polymorphisms in the genes encoding for CYP2C9 and VKOR (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex). Polymorphisms in these genes are associated with increased risk for severe overanticoagulation and bleedings. A clinical trial will be performed in seven European countries to determine whether knowledge of the genotype of patients at the start of coumarin treatment will increase the safety of use of these compounds and whether such gene testing is cost-effective. Patients will be randomized to receive treatment with a coumarin either dosed with an algorithm that does not include information on their genotype, or with an algorithm that does contain this information. The primary outcome will be time within therapeutic INR range. Secondary outcomes include INR>4 and bleedings.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-4-15 | Award Amount: 1.31M | Year: 2008

The project proposal has been prepared in response to the call KBBE-2007-1-4-15 Assessing the socio-economic consequences and costs benefits of measures promoting good animal welfare. Central in this call is support to develop European policies implementing the Action Plan on Animal Welfare. Overall objective of the project is related to the policy instruments needed to achieve the aims of the Action Plan on Animal Welfare. At the end of the project we want to say what policy instruments are effective in the route towards higher animal welfare representing the concerns of civil society and in which competitiveness of the livestock industry is guaranteed. Basic questions in relation to objective 1. What are the current welfare initiatives and standards within the EU and its trade partners? 2. What are strength and weaknesses of these initiatives and standards to the animal, society and the production chain? 3. What policy instruments can be designed to promote high(er) animal welfare standards as aimed at in the Action Plan on Animal Welfare, and how can progress be monitored? 4. What are the benefits, costs and trade impacts of upgraded welfare standards? Activities in relation to objective - Communicate and debate to realize interaction across scientists, relevant stakeholders and citizens - Review and analyse current state of animal welfare in selected EU states and third countries - Examine strength and weaknesses in the current animal welfare standards to opinion of animal scientists, the supply chain, and consumers and citizens - Perform a SWOT-analysis on approaches for upgraded animal welfare - Brainstorm on strategic options for the EU to implement the Action Plan on Animal Welfare - Assesses costs and benefits when approaches and policies are introduced within the production chain - Perform macro-economic analysis of the competitiveness of European agricultural sectors and the impact on world trade - Organise a concluding workshop


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.1.1-1-B | Award Amount: 16.85M | Year: 2012

Neurodegenerative (ND) and neuromuscular (NM) disease is one of the most frequent classes of rare diseases, affecting life and mobility of 500,000 patients in Europe and millions of their caregivers, family members and employers. This NEUROMICS project brings together the leading research groups in Europe, five highly innovative SMEs and relevant oversea experts using the most sophisticated Omics technologies to revolutionize diagnostics and to develop pathomechanism-based treatment for ten major ND and NM diseases. Specifically we aim to: (i) use next generation WES to increase the number of known gene loci for the most heterogeneous disease groups from about 50% to 80%, (ii) increase patient cohorts by large scale genotyping by enriched gene variant panels and NGS of so far unclassified patients and subsequent phenotyping, (iii) develop biomarkers for clinical application with a strong emphasis on presymptomatic utility and cohort stratification, (iv) combine -omics approaches to better understand pathophysiology and identify therapeutic targets, (v) identify disease modifiers in disease subgroups cohorts with extreme age of onset (vi) develop targeted therapies (to groups or personalized) using antisense oligos and histone deacetylase inhibitors, translating the consortiums expertise in clinical development from ongoing trials toward other disease groups, notably the PolyQ diseases and other NMD. To warrant that advances affect a large fraction of patients we limited the selection to a number of major categories, some of which are in a promising stage of etiological and therapeutic research while some others are in great need of further classification. The efforts will be connected through a NEUROMICS platform for impact, communication and innovation that will provide tools and procedures for ensuring trial-readiness, WP performance, sustainability, interaction with the chosen Support IRDiRC and RD-Connect project and involvement of stakeholders in the NDD/NMD field.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 15.78M | Year: 2013

The aim of SYBIL is to carry out extensive functional validation of the genetic determinants of rare and common skeletal diseases and the age related factors contributing to these painful conditions. To achieve this goal SYBIL will gather complementary translational and transnational scientists, systems biologists, disease modellers, leading SMEs and industrialists that will perform in-depth characterisation (complete molecular phenotyping) of pre-clinical models (cellular and animal) for a variety of common and rare skeletal diseases. SYBIL will establish a systematic pipeline of in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models of increasing complexity and will also make use of novel technologies such as iPS cells and exclusive Virtual Patient software to identify potential therapeutic targets for further validation through simultaneous modelling of fundamental and complex physiological pathways. SYBIL will rely on i) an Omics Knowledge Factory for systematically generating new knowledge on skeletal disease pathophysiology and to generate the relevant Omics profiles necessary to detect and validate new disease determinants, biomarkers and therapeutic targets for future clinical developments, and ii) a Systems Biology Hub to integrate the high-throughput and data-dense information, to gain a global understanding of pathophysiological commonalities between different skeletal diseases and recognize predominant shared pathways and mechanisms that may represent new targeted routes to treatment. SYBIL will also identify potential modifier genes and study the epigenome that will ultimately influence the timing and efficacy of new personalised treatments. Overall SYBIL achievements will tremendously boost the efficient pre-clinical assessment and development of therapeutics against skeletal diseases and thus indirectly reduce their social and healthcare burden.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EID | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 2.84M | Year: 2016

The Directive 2009/128/EC sets rules in EU for the sustainable use of pesticides to reduce the risks and impacts of pesticide use on peoples health and the environment. Among the listed actions there is the promotion of low pesticide-input management including non-chemical methods. In parallel several chemical active ingredients have been banned because of toxicity concerns. The result is that growers are left with few control tools against pests. On the other hand most of the available alternative control methods have several limitations, especially in term of efficacy. Several new ideas are not reaching the industry and are confined in the academic would. The concept behind this EIT is to explore new approaches to identify new cutting edge solutions for pest control based on new non classical approaches in strict collaboration with industrial partner and to train 10 highly skilled early stage researchers (ESR) through a doctoral programme that integrates 5 academic research with concept-driven product development in 5 EU companies with a strong curriculum in development and innovation within a large interdisciplinary environment. Microorganisms are often used so far as replacement of chemical active ingredients. The innovative aspect of this EID is to base the new pest control solutions on interactions of microorganisms with plants and insects rather than using them as plant protection products. Microorganisms unsurpassed inclination towards the association with eukaryotic macro-organisms determines traits and qualities in the host that harbours them. Microbial symbionts ability to profoundly transform their living habitat paves the way for unexplored outlooks in the ability to use microbial symbioses as sustainable and renewable tools to improve production and quality in agriculture. Microorganisms are key players in shaping several insects semiochemicals, in particular kairomones indicating a food source or oviposition site for some insect species.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2010.1.1-4. | Award Amount: 3.04M | Year: 2011

Reduction of emissions in shipping is currently driven by new regulations and impact on wealth and climate change, while traffic steadily grows at up to 6% rates yearly in spite of economic recession. Ships on port approach, maneuvering up to mooring and on loading and unloading, also affect the local population. TEFLES addresses both sea and at port emissions scenarios by developing after treatment technologies and combining a selection of innovative and promising technologies with potential high impact, integrating them and assessing their impact with models on sea and port operation scenarios. In addition to after treatment solutions, novel aplicable technologies reducing emissions in operations and reductions in the time of operations at port are also considered. Shore power connection, power generation, propulsion, and advanced use of residual heat applications are included as high potential impact emission reduction solutions. The assessed technology solutions and models are then integrated on the impact models of the sea and port scenarios, and then validated on a Atlantic MoS scenario including head ports. The simulation models will also be applicable to other shipping scenarios. Economic aspects, cost benefit, and regulatory and policy issues are further considered. IMO, EMSA, and national and regional administrations will be consulted, and an end users group will be set up to enlarge the partnership, which already includes ports, specialised industries, and a shipyard. A Short Sea Shipping Association and one of the most qualified MoS operators have adhered through letters of interest. Each scenario model will be completed with a final workshop after validation. Dissemination through Beta testing seminars on use of the models will be provided, as well as a web page.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2012.1.1-05 | Award Amount: 2.91M | Year: 2013

The objective of the LOTUS project is to support the development of GMES by developing applications of Sentinel-3 to complete the space observation infrastructure that are designed for land and ocean monitoring for GMES. Sentinel-3 is the GMES space component for monitoring the oceans. The SRAL instrument onboard Sentinel-3 is a radar altimeter that will provide observations of sea-surface and land-ice topography, in continuation of altimeter missions such as ENVISAT, Jason-1 and Jason-2. Furthermore, the SRAL instrument will operate in a SAR mode and provide along-track high-resolution heights of the sea surface in the open oceans, in the coastal seas, in-land water and sea ice areas. The SAR capability is a new feature and no data products based on this SAR mode data are provided or used operationally. New methodologies and new data processing chains need to be developed to prepare the take-up of the GMES Sentinel-3 data. The LOTUS project will develop new methodologies, data processing chains, and applications of the SAR mode data for the high resolution sea surface heights, wave heights and wind speeds in the open oceans, coastal seas as well as in sea ice covered regions for operational marine services. For the operational land services, the LOTUS project will develop new methodologies, data processing chains, and applications of the SAR mode data for the in-land water levels in rivers and lakes, soil moisture, and snow depths. In turn, the new products based on the SAR mode data will support operational services for emergency response and security in the events of, e.g., storm surges and flooding. The new land products will provide valuable information about the hydrological cycle and support services on monitoring hydrological parameters for climate change. Through a strong involvement of innovative companies and SMEs the LOTUS project will stimulate new commercial activities in the value-adding sectors.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-4-11 | Award Amount: 866.38K | Year: 2009

The nine European Technology Platforms (ETPs) that focus on the Knowledge-Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) join forces in this support action BECOTEPS. The main objectives and the respective activities will be: 1) Achieve closer and more coordinated collaboration between the KBBE ETPs. 2) Develop recommendations for better interaction between KBBE ETP stakeholders along the product chains and the sustainability issue regarding multidisciplinary research, application and policy issues. BECOTEPS will help to link science and application by addressing synergies and gaps i) between the SRAs of the ETPs and ii) with respect to the research preparedness of the scientific community by topical workshops on cross-cutting KBBE issues. The first workshop will address trust and collaboration in the food and feed chain, the second the integration of the non-food chains, and the third cross-cutting sustainability issues. The workshop recommendations on research and policy will be summarised in a White Paper. 3) Encourage discussions among public research initiatives - European and national and between the public and the private research initiatives to foster implementation of the Strategic Research Agendas based on the recommendations developed between the ETPs. In addition, BECOTEPS will promote the KBBE concept with the European Commission, European Parliament and national ministries in the member states including the relevant ERA-NETs. A small number of dissemination events will be held to discuss the KBBE, recommendations from the workshops on implementing cross-cutting issues from the ETPs Strategic Research Agendas (including Lead Markets, SMEs, education and training), and future collaboration.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.71M | Year: 2012

The overall objective of this project is the creation of an ITN network for the structured interdisciplinary training of researchers in advanced thin film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The project proposes the development of new technologies compatible with the cost, efficiency, sustainability and mass production requirements that are needed to become a reliable and future alternative to conventional non renewable energy sources. With this objective in mind, the project will focus on the development of kesterite based solar cells. Kesterites are quaternary compounds with a crystalline structure very similar to that of chalcopyrites (CIGS: Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2). They have a strong potential for thin film low cost PV technologies, related to their direct bandgap and high optical absorption. In contrast with CIGS -where the potential for high mass production is compromised by the scarcity of In- they are constituted by abundant elements. For this, a consortium formed by research institutes, universities and companies with strongly complementary expertises has been formed. This includes groups that are leaders on the development of kesterite cells (Univ. Northumbria, HZB, Univ. Luxembourg) with groups with strong expertise on CIGS technologies (that are the parent technologies for kesterite solar cells) (EMPA, UU-ASC, NEXCIS, IREC, Free Univ. Berlin, Univ. dAix-Marseille, Autonomous Univ. Madrid). Free Univ. Berlin has also significant experience in the crystalline analysis of kesterites. Involvement of private companies (NEXCIS, Abengoa) devoted to the production and exploitation of PV technologies provides with complementary training aspects related to transferability of processes to industrial production and exploitation issues. All these aspects are relevant for the definition of a structured interdisciplinary training programme for the formation of high level researchers that will be required in Europe for the development of competitive PV technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-02-2016 | Award Amount: 15.84M | Year: 2017

inteGRIDy aims to integrate cutting-edge technologies, solutions and mechanisms in a scalable Cross-Functional Platform connecting energy networks with diverse stakeholders, facilitating optimal and dynamic operation of the Distribution Grid (DG), fostering the stability and coordination of distributed energy resources and enabling collaborative storage schemes within an increasing share of renewables. inteGRIDy will: a) Integrate innovative smart grid technologies, enabling optimal and dynamic operation of the distribution systems assets within high grid reliability and stability standards b) Validate innovative Demand Response technologies and relevant business models c) Utilize storage technologies and their capabilities to relieve the DG and enable significant avoidance of RES curtailment, enhancing self-consumption and net metering d) Enable interconnection with transport and heat networks, forming Virtual Energy Network synergies ensuring energy security e) Provide modelling & profiling extraction for network topology representation, innovative DR mechanisms and Storage characterization, facilitating decision making in DGs operations f) Provide predictive, forecasting tools & scenario-based simulation, facilitating an innovative Operation Analysis Framework g) Develop new business and services to create value for distribution domain stakeholders and end users/prosumers in an emerging electricity market. inteGRIDy will impact on: a) operations by reconfigurable topology control & supervision b) market by providing new services c) customer by enhanced engagement through DR mechanisms d) transmission by novel forecasting scenarios for the MV/LV areas e) part of the production incorporating innovative storage targeting the optimum use of RES f) environment by CO2 reduction inteGRIDy approach will be deployed and validated in 6 large-scale and 4 small-scale real-life demonstration covering different climatic zones and markets with different maturity.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: MG-8.6-2016 | Award Amount: 599.94K | Year: 2016

The concept of this project is to organise two competitions for transport research awards to be announced at the TRA conference in 2018 - A Young researchers competition with the goal of stimulating the interest among young researchers/students in the field of sustainable surface transport. - A competition for senior researchers in the field of innovative surface transport concepts based on results only from EU-funded projects.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.2.3-1 | Award Amount: 2.62M | Year: 2011

The BROWSE proposal is focussed directly and precisely on all the requirements of the call text. Specifically, it will: - Review, improve and extend the models currently used in the risk assessment of plant protection products (PPPs) to evaluate the exposure of operators, workers, residents and bystanders. - Use the new and improved exposure models to contribute to the implementation of Regulation 1107/2009 on authorisation of PPPs, replacing Directive 91/414/EC. - Use the new and improved exposure models to contribute to the implementation of the Thematic Strategy on the Sustainable Use of Pesticides. - Involve all relevant stakeholders and end-users and take full account of relevant gender issues in developing the exposure models and policy tools. The workplan is aligned with these key objectives. In addition, several key cross-cutting themes are established to ensure their consistent and integrated treatment throughout the project. These are: exposure scenarios, volatilisation, transfer coefficients, statistical modelling and calibration, and data management. Key stakeholder groups will be represented on the project Advisory Panel as well as participating directly via consultations and workshops, and in surveys to obtain new data on practices and sociobehavioural and gender factors influencing exposure. Models for key exposure scenarios covering different regions of the EU will be developed in order of priority based on consultation with stakeholders, implemented as user-friendly software, and tested with end-users. Project outputs will be delivered through established networks with end-users in EU and national authorities, national training organisations, the pesticide industry, and relevant trade unions and NGOs. The consortium is superbly equipped to address the project objectives, including international leading experts on every aspect and long experience in both the science and the regulatory aspects of exposure assessment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST.2008.1.1.6. | Award Amount: 12.92M | Year: 2009

The study of CER, UNIFE, UIC and Euromot of the railway and engine manufacturing industries concluded on a risk of disruptive effect of the NRMM Directive application on the railway diesel vehicle supply market, leading to a possible risk of a partial modal shift from rail to road on regional passenger lines and freight transportation specialized routes, with even foreseeable consequences on the operations of the main electrified system. Such a shift would of course be highly detrimental to the achievement of the general objectives of a sustainable development of the European transport system. The project would also find the best balance between environmental and economical requirements, in order to avoid an always possible shift from rail transport to a less sustainable mode like road, even on electrified main routes would also encourage the engine industry to give rail applications serious consideration in their product development plans and provide the European Commission with proposals for a flexible move to the IIIB objective. The four years project is therefore build on the basis of several application sub-projects, representative of the different engine applications (rail cars, Diesel Multiple Units, shunting locomotives, main line light and heavy-haul locomotives) that will enable the industry to evaluate the different solutions to be applied to rail systems in real operating conditions. The optimum trade-off between the reduction of pollutant emissions by rail vehicles and the fuel energy consumption and CO2 emissions, as well as the overall impact of the applied technologies on the environment through a life cycle assessment approach, will be identified by this experimental part of the project. But the rail manufacturing industry also wishes to foster the development of rail specific applications of innovative solutions so as to even further develop the competitive advantages of rail transport in terms of sustainable development.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-3.3-5 | Award Amount: 1.78M | Year: 2010

The European Commission and other funding agencies make a large investment in child health research. The health of our children is satisfactory, but there are serious concerns, for example, obesity, mental health, alcohol abuse, and sexuality. We know that there are strong links between the health of young people and their social inclusion and level of education. Our objective is to establish a sustainable network for researchers, funders, policy makers, advocates and young people in Europe, to support collaboration in developing the future of child health research. We will produce an inventory of research, and reports, on gaps in research, and on roadmaps for the future of research. Our co-ordination will establish a unique, open, multi-lingual platform for child health research. This will embrace the full multi-disciplinary diversity of European research, while addressing fragmentation by making the parts visible, and supporting multi-lingual input and searching. We will develop formal processes for finding gaps in research, and for making roadmaps. We will use these to find current gaps, and make roadmaps for the future, including for the necessary research capacity. We will promote our work and our results in a series of meetings open to researchers and other stakeholders. Our consortium is a multi-disciplinary team, with great experience in doing innovative child health research in Europe, in developing, and in delivering child health strategies at national, and European level. This mixture of skills and experience gives us a unique perspective on the strategic problems at European level. We have an Expert Group, including young people, advocates, and researchers who will support us. RICHE will support the development and implementation of child health research strategies, and the use of evidence for child health action. These in turn will support innovative research, improve social policy for children, and so improve the quality of life of European children.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2009-1.3-04 | Award Amount: 4.47M | Year: 2010

SALIANT aims to develop a hand-held device for real-time analysis of trace levels of explosives, chemicals and drugs. The key innovation is a positive detection lateral-flow test for small molecules that is highly sensitive and simple to use making it ideally suited to deployment by First Responders at crime scenes and terrorist incidents. Lateral flow immunodiagnostics has long offered the promise of fast, high quality testing for substances of low molecular weight. There have however been very real challenges to bringing the full power of such technology to bear in this area. The problem is simply size. Large analytes can support the simultaneous binding of both capture and detector antibodies, allowing typical excess-reagent sandwich immunoassays to be formatted in which increasing analyte concentration provides an increase of observable signal over a very low zero background. Small molecules are simply not large enough to support such simultaneous binding. Alternative systems in effect measure how much analyte is not present. This causes major problems in terms of precision, sensitivity and read-out where, classically, increasing concentration of analyte reduces the signal produced, making point-of-need devices often difficult to read. What is required is a robust system in which there is no observable signal in the absence of analyte, and even low level samples give an obvious observable signal over this zero background. SALIANT offers a system based on a small bindable moiety that is first conjugated close to the binding site of a primary antibody against the analyte such that when analyte binds the antibody, the moiety can still be bound by a labelled secondary antibody. A large reagent-analogue of the analyte is also introduced, binding analyte-unbound primary antibody, and thereby blocking binding of the secondary antibody to the moiety. Thus the more analyte present, the more binding of secondary antibody occurs and the more signal is produced.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: TPT-2007-0.0-02 | Award Amount: 1.25M | Year: 2008

The KOMODA proposal is presented as an answer to the research objectives launched by call TPT 2007.2 concerning the optimization of the logistics chain through co-modality. More precisely, KOMODAs objective is to produce a roadmap, with associated action plans, to nurture an integrated e-Logistics platform by and between modes of freight transport across Europe. Such platform must comply with a series of basic requirements: has to be based in open standards, usable by any concern, able to communicate freely between existing applications and allow the integration of legacy systems and future development. Several of such IT logistics platforms are currently in use, but mostly consist of private company applications not connected and not even compatible. For such developments, KOMODA will identify the industry requirements in terms of organization of the logistic chain and technical specifications of the integrated information system. Opportunities and obstacles affecting the future implementation of the e-Logistics integrated platform will be identified, resulting in the development of recommendations to empower the former and minimize the later. KOMODA will follow a bottom-up approach, with a strong involvement of freight industry stakeholders. The work will include a wide Delphi survey amongst the logistics chain stakeholders to obtain a comprehensive picture of available e-logistics applications used in transport operations, their sources, availability, functionality and use by companies. A desk research on transport and technical requirements will complement such exercise. Obstacles and opportunities will be identified for finally developing a structured and coherent action plan for innovation and change leading towards an integrated e-logistics system Europe-wide.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.0-1 | Award Amount: 21.36M | Year: 2013

This project builds on results from the TREAT-NMD and BIO-NMD European projects to develop a personalised-medicinal product through to market for the treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). DMD is an inheritable, childhood rare disease that affects approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn boys. This rare disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, resulting in the absence or defect of the dystrophin protein. As a result, patients suffer from progressive loss of muscle strength, typically rendering them wheelchair-bound before the age of 12 and most patients die in early adulthood due to respiratory and cardiac failure. At present, there is no effective treatment for DMD. The goal of the SCOPE-DMD project is to develop a therapy that can restore the expression of a functional dystrophin protein in a targeted DMD patient sub-population. This will be achieved using RNA-based technology, specifically antisense oligonucleotides (AON) inducing exon skipping. The clinical heterogeneity and disease complexity in rare diseases present a major challenge to properly observe statistically and clinically meaningful treatment effects. Innovative clinical study designs and novel outcome measures are required to reduce development timelines. Based on extensive experience from classical clinical trials of two other AONs in DMD patients, the consortium has designed a highly innovative development plan, including an innovative clinical trial design that if successful, could be applied to future clinical trials in DMD and other rare diseases. Also novel biomarkers and functional outcome measures will be incorporated in additional to more established ones. Multiple layers of expertise and scientific knowledge come together in this SCOPE-DMD project consortium to launch an innovative drug product but also to provide a regulatory and pathway-to-market precedence in order to benefit future patients with rare disorders getting earlier access to treatment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-3.2-1 | Award Amount: 29.36M | Year: 2009

The F3 consortiums vision is that the EUs chemical industrys competitive position would be strongly enhanced if it could operate modular continuous plant (F3 plant) which combines world scale continuous plant efficiency, consistency and scalability with the versatility of batch operation. Our project will deliver such a radically new production mode based on: a) Plugandplay modular chemical production technology, capable of widespread implementation throughout the chemical industry. This technology uses generic backbone facilities designed for rapid interfacing with standardized process equipment containers (PEC). The PEC house process equipment assemblies (PEA) composed of intensified process equipment for fast, flexible future chemical production b) Holistic process design methodology applying process intensification concepts and innovative decision tools. This will accelerate process development and provides a substantial reduction in energy consumption, raw material usage and plant volumes. Our consortium of leading academic & research institutions and 7 major synthetic chemical producing industrial companies has 3 main goals: 1. To prove the technical feasibility of the F3 mode of manufacturing by building and operating a 0.1 to 30 kg/hr demonstration facility, 2. To demonstrate that operation of F3 plant will be more economical, ecoefficient and more sustainable than conventional production modes like large scale continuous or small to medium scale batch processing. 3. To drive a step change in the technology available to EU chemical production and engineering companies by designing intensified equipment for reaction and down stream processing, dissemination of standards for plug and play modular plant and providing open access to the backbone facility Our estimates indicate that the F3 concept will generate additional new business and will save 3.75 billion euro when existing products change to the F3 mode of manufacture.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2012.4.2-1 | Award Amount: 4.61M | Year: 2013

Motivated by the opportunity to develop industry pull applications and services for the European EGNOS and GALILEO satellite systems, SPARTACUS will design, realise, test and validate in simulated and real world scenarios GALILEO-ready tracking/positioning solutions for critical asset tracking and crisis management. Integrating, adapting, and improving hardware, software, communication, and tracking algorithm areas of expertise from consortium members strategically committed to GNSS business expansion, SPARTACUS will develop services dedicated to three application areas. They are 1) to track, trace, and localise critical transport assets especially in times of crisis and in case of major failure of existing networks, 2) to track the flow of relief support goods from the sending side to the receiving/end place, and 3) to support and ensure the safety of first responders in crisis management operations. The project will employ a deliberate methodology that leads progression through Identification, Development, Implementation and Exploitation. SPARTACUS innovation areas include hardware adaptations, algorithms for precision improvement, integration of the receivers with inertial platforms to provide dead reckoning functionalities, and communication availability in emergency by restoring local existing network over satellite backhauling. In addition, modular and scalable platforms will be made appropriate for each application area. Consortium networks, marketing channels, and end users from the rail, disaster relief, and first responder sectors will prepare these new EU-specific services for market uptake.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: Shift2Rail-RIA | Phase: S2R-OC-CCA-03-2015 | Award Amount: 1.27M | Year: 2016

DESTINATE aims to develop tools and methodologies for railway noise simulation and cost-benefit analysis of mitigation actions of interior and exterior noise. For accurate noise prediction it is essential to characterize the structure-borne and airborne sound sources accurately in order to create valid input for sound prediction simulation models. The calculated interior and exterior noise can be auralised and visualised in a studio to evaluate the sound quality and sound comfort of potential mitigation measures in the vehicle design process. Auralisation and visualisation of noise can be used to assess the annoyance reduction of a given measure. Thus human perception is adequately taken into account. For decision-making the cost of different design options is a very important parameter. DESTINATE aims to further develop cost effectiveness prediction and thus create the foundation for powerful tools to support decision-making on noise & vibration mitigation measures.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2012.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.09M | Year: 2013

There is a high demand for the design of lightweight energy efficient structures for transport applications in order to meet CO2 emissions targets set worldwide. To achieve this designers have introduced the concept of hybrid structures where two or more lightweight materials are used each possessing unique properties that when joined together result in high performance lightweight structures that would not have been possible if a single material was used. This approach requires the development of joining techniques for materials with fundamentally different physical properties that will ensure the safe and reliable transfer of load between the constituent materials. SAFEJOINT addresses this challenge by developing novel techniques for metal to metal and metal to composite joining as well as developing novel techniques for the non-destructive inspection and evaluation of such joints in order to enhance confidence to designers and end-users of hybrid structures of their through life safe performance.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.4 | Award Amount: 3.62M | Year: 2010

The efficient design of embedded systems is hampered by the separation of engineering disciplines in current state of the art development approaches. A methodology to address system-level design issues across discipline boundaries is lacking and tool support is poor. This design gap inhibits iterative and concurrent engineering, leading to sub-optimal designs and long development lead times. Moreover, the design gap is widening because of increasing system complexity and increasing capabilities of the system artifacts used.DESTECS will create a methodology and supporting open tools platform for the collaborative and multidisciplinary development of dependable embedded real-time control systems. We will develop a methodology combining continuous time and formal discrete event modeling with support for iterative design evolution.Model analysis will be based on co-simulation and the framework will support explicit modeling of faults and fault-tolerance mechanisms from the outset. Tool support is crucial: the methodology will be supported by an open, extendible tools platform, populated with plug-ins supporting co-simulation, test and code generation. DESTECS does not replace current industry practice but it will facilitate and support the cross-discipline design dialogue by integration of domain-specific best practices. The methods and tools development is driven by industry-led case studies which also provide evaluation of the emerging technology.The novel aspects of this proposal are the use of a systems-level modeling approach based on co-simulation of formal models, the explicit modeling of faults and fault-tolerance at this level and the support for lightweight trade-off analysis between design alternatives on the basis of extra-functional properties, especially resilience. In particular, the development of an open tools framework for co-simulation will encourage greater industrial uptake.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-32-2014 | Award Amount: 8.38M | Year: 2015

With a current volume of over USD 100 billion and annual growth rates of over 10%, the world-wide market for cloud computing can be considered as the major growth area in ICT. However, big companies and public authorities are reluctant to entrust their most sensitive data to external parties for storage and processing. The reason for their hesitation is clear: There exist no satisfactory approaches to adequately protect the data during its lifetime in the cloud. PRISMACLOUD addresses these challenges and yields a portfolio of novel security enabled cloud services, guaranteeing the required security for sensitive data in the cloud. Techniques for outsourcing computation with verifiable correctness and authenticity-preservation allow to securely delegate computations to cloud providers. A distributed multi-cloud data storage architecture shares data among several cloud providers and improves security and availability. Dynamically updating shares by means of novel techniques avoids vendor lock-in, preserves data authenticity, facilitates long term privacy and promotes a dynamic cloud provider market. Claims about the secure connection and configuration of the virtualized cloud infrastructures and properties of cloud topologies are verifiable by means of cryptographic techniques. User privacy issues are addressed by data minimization and anonymization technologies due to the application of privacy-preserving cryptographic techniques. As feasibility proof, three use cases from the fields of SmartCity, e-Government, and e-Health, will be implemented and evaluated by the project participants. The PRISMACLOUD work program is complemented with activities addressing secure user interfaces, secure service composition, secure implementation in software and hardware, security certification, and an impact analysis from an end-user view. In order to converge with the European Cloud Computing Strategy, a strategy for the dissemination of results into standards is developed.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.7.1 | Award Amount: 12.23M | Year: 2008

OASIS introduces an innovative, Ontology-driven, Open Reference Architecture and Platform, which will enable and facilitate interoperability, seamless connectivity and sharing of content between different services and ontologies in all application domains relevant to applications for the elderly and beyond. The OASIS platform is open, modular, holistic, easy to use and standards abiding. It includes a set of novel tools for content/services connection and management, for user interfaces creation and adaptation and for service personalization and integration. Through this new Architecture, over 12 different types of services are connected with the OASIS Platform for the benefit of the elderly, covering user needs and wants in terms of Independent Living Applications (nutritional advisor, activity coach, brain and skills trainers, social communities platform, health monitoring and environmental control), Autonomous Mobility and Smart Workplaces Applications (elderly-friendly transport information services, elderly-friendly route guidance, personal mobility services, mobile devices, biometric authentication interface and multimodal dialogue mitigation and other smart workplace applications). Applications are all integrated as a unified, dynamic service batch, managed by the OASIS Service Centre and supporting all types of mobile devices (tablet PC, PDA, smartphone, automotive device, ITV, infokiosk, ...) and all types of environments (living labs, sheltered homes, private homes, two car demonstrators, public transport, DSRT, etc.) in 4 Pilot sites Europewide. As user friendliness and acceptability is a top priority for the project, a user-centred-design approach is followed along the service and application development. Tested iteratively and thoroughly by hundreds of end users, their caregivers and other stakeholders, the OASIS platform and applications will be optimized and submitted for standardization by the purpose-established OASIS world-wide Industrial Forum.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.5.1 | Award Amount: 12.70M | Year: 2008

The overall concept of the CD-MEDICS IP is to develop a technology platform for point-of-care diagnostics, capable of simultaneous genomic and proteomic detection, with embedded communication abilities for direct interfacing with hospital information systems. This will be achieved by exploiting breakthroughs at the confluences of bio-, micro- and nano- technologies to create a low-cost non-invasive intelligent diagnosis system. This platform will be developed in a modular format, which will allow each module to be developed and exploited individually. The modules will subsequently be integrated to facilitate the desired application. Advances in data communications, molecular biology and biosensor technology, with the integration of nanostructured functional components in macro and microsystems, will facilitate the realisation of a minimally invasive generic platform, which is capable of multi-parametric monitoring and will be interoperable with electronic medical records. The advantages of integrated biosensor systems include their ease of use, their sensitivity, their inherent selectivity (preventing problems due to interfering substances), their versatility (allowing in-field use) and their cost effectiveness. Addressing the future health care requirement of an individualised theranostic approach, the specific application that will be demonstrated in this IP will be for the management, monitoring and diagnosis of coeliac disease, with the proposed technology contributing to significant advances in sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis. The technology platform developed, however, could be applied to a variety of clinical screening applications, such as cancer. The radical innovation proposed in this IP will result in a concrete prime deliverable of a technology platform of wide application and unquestionable socio-economic benefit, increasing European competitiveness whilst contributing considerably to the quality of life well-being of the population.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-02b-2015 | Award Amount: 7.63M | Year: 2016

European crop production is to remain competitive while reducing environmental impacts, requiring development and uptake of effective soil improving cropping systems. The overall aim of SOILCARE is to identify and evaluate promising soil-improving cropping systems and agronomic techniques increasing profitability and sustainability across scales in Europe. A trans-disciplinary approach will be used to evaluate benefits and drawbacks of a new generation of soil improving cropping systems, incorporating all relevant bio-physical, socio-economic and political aspects. Existing information from literature and long term experiments will be analysed to develop a comprehensive methodology for assessing performance of cropping systems at multiple levels. A multi-actor approach will be used to select promising soil-improving cropping systems for scientific evaluation in 16 study sites across Europe covering different pedo-climatic and socio-economic conditions. Implemented cropping systems will be monitored with stakeholder involvement, and will be assessed jointly with scientists. Specific attention will be paid to adoption of soil-improving cropping systems and agronomic techniques within and beyond the study sites. Results from study sites will be up-scaled to the European level to draw general lessons about applicability potentials of soil-improving cropping systems and related profitability and sustainability impacts, including assessing barriers for adoption at that scale. An interactive tool will be developed for end-users to identify and prioritize suitable soil-improving cropping systems anywhere in Europe. Current policies and incentives will be assessed and targeted policy recommendations will be provided. SOILCARE will take an active dissemination approach to achieve impact from local to European level, addressing multiple audiences, to enhance crop production in Europe to remain competitive and sustainable through dedicated soil care.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2007.7.1 | Award Amount: 1.66M | Year: 2008

Subject of the Coordination Action AALIANCE will be Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) solutions based on advanced ICT technologies for the areas of aging at work, aging at homed and aging in the society. AALIANCE will\n- provide a framework for stakeholders, led by industry, to define research and development priorities, timeframes and action plans on strategically important issues in the field of Ambient Assisted Living\n- play a key role in ensuring an adequate focus of research funding for AAL, in fostering effective public-private partnerships and in developing a European research policy, in particular in focusing on FP7 and on current activities launched by EU member states (AAL 169).\n\nTherefore the immediate objectives of AALIANCE consist of:\n- setting-up a sustainable network - starting with 14 partners to be extended to approx. 35 - involving companies as technology providers and systems integrators, service providers, research organisations and user associations\n- coordinating the various activities of European industry and research institutions in the field of Ambient Assisted Living,\n- defining standardisation requirements\n- providing recommendations for a European RTD policy on Ambient Assisted Living, and\n- supporting European and national entities to increase political awareness and intensify activities for the enhancement of new AAL technologies.\n\nFrom these activities it is expected to strengthen the Ambient Assisted Living value chain in Europe, to reinforce the position of providers of Ambient Assisted Living solutions in Europe and address one of the most promising markets of industrialised countries.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-16-2014 | Award Amount: 3.00M | Year: 2015

The accelerated development of shale gas is accompanied by growing public concern regarding the safety of shale gas extraction and its impact on human health and the environment. For the US, shale gas exploitation proved very successful in changing the energy landscape in terms of security of domestic supply and increased contribution of gas in the energy mix. For Europe, shale gas exploitation could increase our resources and production of natural gas; a critical fuel for the transition to a low carbon energy system. However, there are a number of important gaps in our present understanding of shale gas exploration and exploitation, and a strong need for independent, science-based knowledge of its potential impacts in a European context. The M4ShaleGas program focuses on reviewing and improving existing best practices and innovative technologies for measuring, monitoring, mitigating and managing the environmental impact of shale gas exploration and exploitation in Europe. The technical and social research activities will yield integrated scientific recommendations for 1) how to minimize environmental risks to the subsurface, surface and atmosphere, 2) propose risk reduction and mitigation measures and 3) how to address the public attitude towards shale gas development. The 18 research institutes from 10 European Union Member States that collaborate in the M4ShaleGas consortium cover different geopolitical regions in Europe, including Member States that are at the forefront regarding shale gas exploration and exploitation in Europe as well as Member States where shale gas exploitation is not yet being actively pursued. The project governance ensures proper integration of all research activities. Knowledge and experience on best practices is imbedded by direct collaboration with US and Canadian research partners and input from representatives from the industry. During the project, results will be public and actively disseminated to all stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2010.1.1-2. | Award Amount: 3.34M | Year: 2011

The global optimization of energy systems aboard future and currently operating cargos is crucial to reduce greenhouse gas emission in a substantial and cost effective way. It is also of major economic interest in the merchant marine sector. A holistic approach considering the overall production and management of energy aboard ships (including propulsion systems and energy output optimization) is the most promising approach to accelerate the adoption of low emission-higher energy efficiency cargo ships. Taking this consideration into account and based on the array of innovative and renewable sources of energy, the INOMANSHIP concept aims at proposing a break-through energy management system aboard ships based on a preferred DC network integrating all potential sources of energy. A Life-Cycle Analysis study will be performed. The proposed energy management system will gather data in real time and will be able to anticipate and optimize energy needs for each operational configuration of the ship considering risk levels while systematically favouring less polluting and cost effective sources of energy. The INOMANSHIP project will therefore contribute to reducing green house gas (GHG) emissions and pollution as a whole (SOx, NOx, Noise). It will foster European competitiveness by providing an innovative global advantage to both European equipment manufacturers and shipyards. The INOMANSHIP European consortium represents a well balanced combination of European industrial partners, institutions and organisations. It comprises world-class industrial leaders in their fields of activity, leading research organisations and institutions, experts of the world maritime sector and specialists of project management. This unique mix of expertise and knowledge will allow INOMANSHIP to respond perfectly to the SST.2010.1.1-2. topic of the present call through the successful development of an innovative energy management system optimizing energy efficiency of cargo ships.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.4.2-4 | Award Amount: 3.94M | Year: 2009

Cardiovascular malformation (CVM) is the commonest cause of childhood death in developed countries. In the EU there are 51,000 new cases each year and two million affected individuals. Yet, despite intensive research, the cause of 80% of CVM remains elusive. The mission of CHeartED is to identify genetic and environmental pathways that can be modified with the goal of reducing preventable CVM incidence. Epidemiological studies have shown that the stress of maternal hypo or hyperglycaemia increases the incidence of CVM. We plan a genetic association study in individuals with and without CVM born to diabetic mothers, to test whether genetic variants are associated with CVM. A similar study, without prior risk hypothesis, addresses tetralogy of Fallot, a CVM, which requires surgery in early life. These studies will reveal common genetic variants associated with CVM and thus add to existing knowledge on the aetiology of CVM. Moreover, the identification of genetic factors that differ in the context of maternal diabetes will disclose any associations in genetic pathways influenced by environmental factors. RNA expression studies in the mouse to identify new genes and pathways involved in outflow tract malformations and maternal diabetes associated with CVM, will complement the human studies. Finally, we will develop a 3D atlas of gene expression patterns and cardiac morphology at key developmental stages that will serve as a morphological framework. Central to our proposal is the development of a bioinformatics tool complemented by an open-access Wiki-based database. The bioinformatics tool will combine the sequence data and expression data generated by the human and mouse studies with morphology and literature to prioritize genes and generate hypotheses. The Wiki, which will contain existing and new genetic and environmental knowledge on heart development, will be an aid for many groups working on cardiovascular development and a novel means of disseminating our findings


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: MG-5.2-2014 | Award Amount: 4.41M | Year: 2015

Urban areas represent the greatest challenges for freight transport and service trips, both in terms of goods distribution and service allocation performance, and environmental impacts (air emission, traffic congestion, road safety, accidents and noise). The salient scope of the proposal is the enabling of knowledge and understanding of freight distribution and service trips by providing guidance for implementing effective and sustainable policies and measures. This guidance will support the choice of the most optimal and applicable solutions for urban freight and service transport, and will facilitate stakeholder collaboration and the development, field testing and transfer of best governance and business models. This shall be achieved through: - the targeted understanding of urban freight and service trips, fostered by data collection on city logistics, - field testing and implementation of representative city logistics measures, - the development and application of a modular, integrated, evaluation framework for the assessment of these measures - the development of a typology between cities and potential city logistics components, and - the provision of guidance to cities, shaping consistent implementation channels for successful solutions, all according to the local needs and constraints. These activities will be accompanied by the production of practical tools that could support the take-up impact of NOVELOG project to wider international city and industrial networks and beyond the projects lifetime. NOVELOG will contribute to the European Commissions research and policy agenda through the generation of sound knowledge that introduces a new approach to guidance strategies that supports a more sustainable urban environment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.62M | Year: 2010

The ability of some compounds to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram and to precipitate Torsade de Pointes (TdP, a potentially fatal arrhythmia) has caused several regulatory interventions, including drug withdrawals. Specific guidelines have been implemented to detect QT liability of new compounds as early as possible. However there is growing evidence that an increase in the QT interval does not necessarily lead to TdP which further increased the regulatory and clinical difficulties. This proposal will assess the arrhythmogenic potential of antipsychotics, antihistamines and anti-infectives (> 250 compounds). It will fulfill this aim by: reviewing the literature on in-vitro and in-vivo preclinical evidence; conducting in-silico modeling to predict the arrhythmic potential through target profiling and docking molecules in existing atomistic models and predicting the effects on hERG K\, Na\, Ca\\ channels; analyzing the information in national and international pharmacovigilance DBs of spontaneous reports; conducting prospective case control surveillance on symptomatic QT prolongation; conducting cohort studies in psychiatric and hematology patients; analyzing information from existing studies to assess the association between drug use and various arrhythmia outcomes; and collecting blood samples from cases and drug-matched controls to investigate potential effect modification by candidate genes and a hypothesis generating approach including more than 2000 genes. Healthcare DBs on 27 million persons in 5 countries will be used to calculate rates and relative risks of arrhythmic events during drug use. Predictions on arrhythmic potential will be compared with actual postmarketing risk to assess the predictive value of preclinical markers. All information will be integrated to allow for ranking the arrhythmic potential of all the 250 study drugs and creation of risk charts that will allow for more informed treatment and decision making.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN 2013.3 | Award Amount: 11.27M | Year: 2014

Marine biofouling, the unwanted colonization of marine organisms on surfaces immersed in seawater has a huge economic and environmental impact in terms of maintenance requirements for marine structures, increased vessel fuel consumption, operating costs, greenhouse gas emissions and spread of non-indigenous species. The SEAFRONT project will aim to significantly advance the control of biofouling and reduce hydrodynamic drag by integrating multiple technology concepts such as surface structure, surface chemistry and bio-active/bio-based fouling control methodologies into one environmentally benign and drag-reducing solution for mobile and stationary maritime applications. In parallel, a combination of laboratory-based performance benchmarking and end-user field trials will be undertaken in order to develop an enhanced fundamental/mechanistic understanding of the coating-biofouling interaction, the impact of this on hydrodynamic drag and to inform technology development and down-selection of promising fouling control solutions. This project aims to facilitate a leap forward in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from marine transport and the conservation of the marine ecosystem by adopting a multidisciplinary and synergistic approach to fouling control.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.3.2 | Award Amount: 4.63M | Year: 2013

The HILED project will advance the state of the art of Solid State Lighting (SSL) through research on innovative light engines that take advantage of full control of light. The incorporated intelligence enables responsive fine tuning of spectral properties in real time, as well as precise dimming capabilities. These smart engines with added intelligence offer natural illumination patterns that respect our biological circadian rhythms. This can be done very accurately by spectral selection or even through Correlated Colour Temperature (CCT) adaptation by using the most efficient combination of white LEDs, coloured LEDs, and OLEDs as building blocks of the light source, while satisfying different constraints on energy efficiency. Markets such as horticulture and greenhouses would also benefit from fully controllable light engines, whose spectral content can be dynamically adapted to the plant needs in real time, through the establishment of algorithmic strategies and feed-back systems that control the growth process. Besides the spectral effects on leaf photosynthesis there are more important spectral effects on morphology and development of plants. Morphological effects directly influence the ornamental value of cut flowers and pot plants and therefore their economic value. Furthermore, these morphological effects may strongly influence the growth rate of the plants. Last but not least the choice for light spectrum may affect the production of secondary metabolites. These metabolites can have human health promoting effects (e.g. anti-oxidants, vitamins, etc).Additionally, these light engines are particularly well suited for museum lighting, where careful selection of spectral content may achieve an optimal balance between energy efficiency, quality of light and art conservation. The project aims overall to foster lighting systems, which can communicate through intelligent protocols and interact with humans in real time, while proving cost-effective solutions


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.1 | Award Amount: 14.31M | Year: 2011

d-LIVER applies scenario-driven development methodologies to address an unmet need for bio-artificial liver support via continuous detoxification as remote transient therapy at the Point-of-Need. The liver is a complex organ with various vital functions in synthesis, detoxification and regulation; its failure is life-threatening and the only curative treatment is transplantation. Whilst awaiting transplantation, or after liver resection, patients need to be supported with detoxification systems which, currently mainly based on filtration, do not support metabolic liver function. This can only be provided by living cells. Thus, development of ICT-enabled bio-artificial liver support systems with associated remote monitoring to assist in the treatment and management of liver patients in care settings extending from the hospital to the home is essential.\nd-LIVER targets sensor-based monitoring of patient health status at home, concentrating on continuous monitoring of physiological parameters and discrete measurement of a defined set of biochemical species. d-LIVER also targets remote monitoring and control of the bio-artificial liver and communication with patient sensor networks and hospital information systems. Systems will be capable of remote, secure communication of the status of both the patient and the bio-artificial liver to central clinical services such that they can schedule swift and beneficial treatment and remedial actions. In this way d-LIVER will provide fundamental advances in liver support by reducing hospitalisation costs while enhancing quality of care and, at the same time, reinforcing European leadership in Personal Health systems.\nIn a parallel, high-risk, activity the production of human hepatocytes from pancreatic progenitor cells will be investigated. These would be ideal for use in d-LIVER systems since they may provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, which would overcome drawbacks associated with both primary hepatocytes and stem cells.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: SEC-2011.7.4-1 | Award Amount: 8.18M | Year: 2012

The EUROFORGEN-NoE proposal aims to develop a network of excellence for the creation of a European Virtual Centre of Forensic Genetic Research. Forensic genetics is a highly innovative field of applied science with a strong impact on the security of citizens. However, the genetic methods to identify offenders as well as the creation of national DNA databases have caused concerns to the possible violation of privacy rights. Furthermore, studies to assess the societal dimension of security following the implementation of even more intrusive methods such as the genetic prediction of externally visible characteristics are highly relevant for their public acceptance. The network includes some of the leading groups in European forensic genetic research. It aims to create a closer integration of existing collaborations, as well as establishing new interactions in the field of security, as all key players are addressed: scientists, stakeholders, end-users, educational centres and scientific societies. Only if a long-term collaborative network can be established it will become possible to connect all scientific groups active in the field of forensic genetics, and to initiate a sustained effort covering all aspects of research. These efforts have to be combined with identifying and selecting the most innovative ideas to meet the challenges of analyzing biological crime scene samples compromised by degradation or indentified as mixtures of traces from multiple human sources. The proposal integrates five working packages. WP 1 is devoted to management and coordination. WP 2 will lead the activities aimed at the creation of the virtual centre of research. WP 3 will carry out exemplar projects as models of collaboration and integration of cutting edge research, later complemented by a competitive call for new research projects. The societal dimension of security as well as the ethical and legal aspects wil be addressed in WP 4, whereas WP 5 is devoted to education and training.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-1.2-6 | Award Amount: 3.77M | Year: 2008

Inherited Neuromuscular Diseases (NMD) form a large group of diseases including Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophies (LGMD), Congenital Muscular Dystrophies (CMD), Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies (DMD/BMD), or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Within a given disease group genetic and clinical heterogeneity is the hallmark. The precise diagnostic of neuromuscular diseases thus requires extensive clinical examination and targeted complementary tests. Additionally, since many of the disease causing mutations are known, molecular and genetic tests are performed to confirm and precise the diagnostic. According to presently available technologies, this is highly complex and time consuming. Thus, many patients remain devoid of genetic confirmation of their disease. More importantly, new cutting edge therapies cannot and will not be possibly envisaged in absence of a precise genetic diagnosis. New molecular diagnosis tools, enabling quick, reliable and cost-effective sequencing of numerous NMD genes are thus required. The development of such tools would allow performing the genetic diagnostic of NMDs patients. DNA chips have the potential to address this issue, in a time and cost effective way. The goal of this project is to i) design and validate a DNA Chip for sequencing genes responsible for LGMDs, CMDs, DMD/BMD, and CMTs, and ii) use the DNA Chip technology to identify new genes/mutations involved in these inherited NMD and increase the molecular diagnosis/patients ratio. This approach will be based on a gene candidate approach. NMD-Chip will thus lead to the development of a novel sensitive and reliable (98%) diagnostic tool, with time and cost effectiveness dedicated to neuromuscular disorders. In total, NMD-Chip, based on human genome knowledge and an advanced read out technology, will give patients an easy access to molecular diagnosis and will thus allow them to benefit from cutting edge therapies which are currently developed.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.48M | Year: 2013

One dimensional nanostructures (1DNS) produced from various elemental (Si and Ge) and compound (III-V and II-VI) semiconductors are receiving increasing worldwide attention due to their unique properties and potential for a wide range of applications. They are the building blocks for single photon emitters, third generation solar cells and the monolithic integration of optoelectronic devices. 1DNS can be used to fabricate the smallest light emitting devices and lasers. Despite recent progress, many fundamental and applied challenges still prevent transfer of 1DNS from laboratories to large scale industrial use. The proposed NanoEmbrace assembles eight leading industry partners and ten internationally renowned institutions in materials science, engineering, chemistry, condensed matter physics and nanoscale device fabrication. The original vision of NanoEmbrace is to gain superior control and understanding of 1DNS and to transfer 1DNS from laboratory to industry. It is probably the first organised attempt to put together all the competences and capabilities, experimental and theoretical, necessary for the comprehension of the mechanisms that govern the growth of 1DNS that cannot all be described by existing models. We also aim to provide the highest quality multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral training to early career researchers (ESRs) in nanoscience to create the next generation of research and industry leaders. The ESRs joining NanoEmbrace will have a unique opportunity to enjoy close personal contact with internationally renowned experts and to put together an unprecedented, complex but unified overall understanding of the growth of 1DNS and to develop the process required to produce practical commercial devices. To deliver the highest quality of training to young talented researchers, NanoEmbrace has identified the key research themes: controlled synthesis, theoretical modelling, characterisation of 1DNS and the integration of 1DNS into device fabrication.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PROTEC-1-2014 | Award Amount: 2.42M | Year: 2015

Space weather can have detrimental, and in some cases catastrophic, effects upon a multitude of technologies on which we depend as part our daily lives. Adverse space weather is now known to result from solar flares and coronal mass ejections released from the turbulent and highly complex magnetic fields of active regions. Understanding how active region magnetic fields evolve and produce these events is therefore of fundamental importance to developing accurate and reliable space-weather monitoring and forecasting capabilities. We therefore propose to develop an advanced flare prediction system (Flare Likelihood And Region Eruption Forecasting; FLARECAST) that is based on automatically extracted physical properties of active regions coupled with state-of-the-art flare prediction methods and validated using the most appropriate forecast verification measures. Active region properties, such as area, magnetic flux, shear, magnetic complexity, helicity and proxies for magnetic energy, will be extracted from solar magnetogram and white-light images in near-realtime using advanced image-processing techniques. Once active region properties have been extracted, they will be correlated with solar flare activity and used to optimize prediction algorithms based on statistical, unsupervised clustering and supervised learning methods. This will enable us to validate our image processing and flare prediction algorithms before launching a near-realtime flare forecasting service, the first of its kind in the world. FLARECAST will therefore form the basis of the first quantitative, physically motivated and autonomous active region monitoring and flare forecasting system, which will be of use to space-weather researchers and forecasters in Europe and around the globe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.1.4-1 | Award Amount: 4.48M | Year: 2011

Climate and climate change has high impact on society. Better understanding and improved prediction skills of future weather and climate is vital to protect lives, goods and infrastructures. Different sectors of society and infrastructure are more or less designed to accommodate the current level of climate variability. The prospect of a changing climate necessitates adapting these designs. To prevent high costs, it is of paramount importance that the most reliable and accurate climate information is used to underpin the development of new adaptation strategies. In response to this need, climate scientists, in close cooperation with climate impact specialists, have started to generate and provide information on future climate projections, aimed at supporting adaptation policies. These efforts are often organized at a national level and, at present, differ considerably in the methods used and the level of user involvement. It has been recognized (WMO-WCC3, EU White paper on Adaptation) that coordination of climate services at an international level would greatly advance the benefits of climate science for adaptation policies. This effort must find a way to deal with the strong local nature of climate impacts and adaptation needs. The central objective of ECLISE is to take the first step towards the realisation of a European Climate Service. ECLISE is a European effort in which researchers, in close cooperation with users, develop and demonstrate local climate services to support climate adaption policies. It does so by providing climate services for several climate-vulnerable regions in Europe, organized at a sectorial level: coastal defence, cities, water resources and energy production. Furthermore, ECLISE will define, in conceptual terms, how a pan-European Climate Service could be developed in the future, based on experiences from the aforementioned local services and the involvement of a broader set of European decision makers and stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SEC-2013.4.1-5 | Award Amount: 1.32M | Year: 2014

The overall aim of the TACTIC project is to increase preparedness to large-scale and cross-border disasters amongst communities and societies in Europe. To achieve this, TACTIC will consider studies on risk perception and preparedness (including good practices and preparedness programmes) in order to develop a participatory community preparedness audit enabling communities to assess, impacts in a multi-hazard context, their motivations and capacities to prepare for large-scale and/or cross-border disasters. This forms the basis for developing context-sensitive education and training strategies and practices that are embedded in an overarching long-term learning framework (including evaluation procedures) for increasing the overall prepares of communities and societies across Europe. Rather than taking a top-down approach to preparedness, TACTIC will pursue a collaborative project strategy by including different user and stakeholder groups in the development, testing and validation of tools and materials throughout the process of the project by conducting four case studies focusing on terrorism, floods, pandemics and earthquakes.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2012-2 | Award Amount: 2.23M | Year: 2013

Europes refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump industry has an annual turnover of 30 billion and employs around 200,000 people. Within this industry our SME Associations represent over 1,000 SMEs within the heat pump manufacture, solar thermal system manufacture, design and installation sectors. Led by these associations the HeatXchange consortium consists of European SME associations, SME end users and some of Europes leading research associations. Together, we are proposing to develop new platform technologies that are relevant to our industries and their markets across Europe. The HeatXchange project will provide European manufacturers with alternative designs and manufacturing routes that will assist them expand their product range and to effectively compete with non-European competition. This will be achieved through the development and demonstration of a novel heat exchanger technology and manufacturing process that will enable increased market penetration of European-made air source type heat pump systems. The new platform technology will improve the efficiency and reduce the size of the evaporator, whilst enabling the integration of secondary or even tertiary energy sources. Overall these advanced will enable significant increases in Seasonal Performance Factors (SPF) which will improve the return on investment for consumers and hence attractiveness of EU air based heat pump systems. During the project this technology will be disseminated amongst our 1,000 members within the industry and showcased at events and conferences. Our aim is for HeatXchange to increase air-based heat pump sales by European manufacturers by at least 100,000 across Europe between 2014-2020 adding 300 million of value to Europes economy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 12.44M | Year: 2013

KillSpill delivers innovative (bio)technologies, which can be integrated to the real sequences of state-of-the-art actions used currently to cleanup oil spills. The catalogue of KillSpill products & technologies is based on a review of technology & knowledge gaps in approaches of oil spill disasters and brings appropriate tools for 1st response, follow-up, and longer-term actions, specifically tailored to the versatility of oil spills. KillSpill develops chemicals & biochemicals to be used for 1st response actions to disperse/emulsify oil and materials enabling the containment and sorption of oil, preparing the field for the follow-up actions. KillSpill develops (Bio)technologies aiming at intensified biodegradation processes by bioaugmentation/biostimulation as follow-up and longer term actions in aerobic/slight anoxic compartments. KillSpill develops (bio)technologies adapted for the remediation of anoxic/anaerobic fresh & chronically polluted sediments. KillSpill compiles knowledge on dispersion/sorption and biodegradation processes to produce multifunctional products, which are suited for follow-up and longer term actions. The multifunctional products address the necessity for integrated bioremediation (bioavailability, metabolic requirements, etc.) and are efficient along the whole redox gradient from surface water to sediments. The products/technologies are field-tested in open sea oil spills and large mesocosms to unravel the champions products & technologies. The (bio)tools are benchmarked with existing solutions using cutting-edge analytics, biosensors, and omics and checked for eco-efficiency to merit green label. KillSpill consortium is multidisciplinary and gathers 33 partners from 12 EU and EU-associated countries and USA; 18 research & academic institutions, 14 SMEs, and 1 association of oil spill companies work together with the support of a high level advisory board to cover the whole chain of oil spill (bio)remediation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 7.84M | Year: 2013

BIOIMAGE-NMD will develop and apply imaging technology to monitor response to novel therapies in neuromuscular diseases (NMD) and will use Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as an exemplar disease. DMD is well characterised genetically and clinically but to date a disease modifying treatment is not available. One of the most promising developments for future treatment of NMD is RNA modulation through antisense oligonucleotides (AON). In DMD, AON are used for exon skipping and this is a genuine example of personalised medicine, where patients are treated according to their specific gene mutation. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) are used to assess structural and metabolic muscle pathology in NMD but their effectiveness in monitoring therapy is yet to be shown. The project will apply a simultaneous MRI/MRSI protocol in multi-centre clinical trials of AON therapy in DMD with the aim of establishing a clinical proof of principle that these imaging measures are effective biomarkers of therapeutic response. To enhance the imaging protocol, novel Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTI) methods will be developed and optimised to assess muscle microstructure and applied in these trials. The project will also develop methods for radiolabelling of AON and demonstrate the use of pre-clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI to assess the tissue targeting, bio-distribution and pharmacokinetics of AON in vivo. BIOIMAGE-NMD will deliver PET/MRI and MRI/MRSI technologies for both drug development and clinical evaluation roles which will significantly contribute to bringing personalized therapeutic interventions in rare and common diseases to the market.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-01-2014 | Award Amount: 832.89K | Year: 2015

The miniaturisation of sensing, actuating, and computing components together with the increasing number of interacting systems in strongly connected environments, and the growing complexity of such systems have triggered a paradigm shift. CPS concepts address challenges for system implementation such as increasing complexity and flexibility. These challenges and the need to optimise performance and comply with essential requirements like safety and security raise many questions that are partially addressed by current research in areas such as transport, health, production, smart grids and smart cities already. Nevertheless, there is still a huge gap between theoretical concepts, technical developments, and successful application, as well as considerable differences with regard to propagation and maturity of CPS between application domains and along the value chain. Strategic action is needed to bring the relevant stakeholders together and to facilitate mutually beneficial collaborations between them. Road2CPS has been conceived to respond to this situation by Analysing impact from past and ongoing projects, identifying gaps and bridging efforts towards impact multiplication Developing technology, application and innovation strategy roadmaps for CPS to serve as a catalyst for early adoption of CPS technologies Enhancing CPS implementation and exposing exploitation opportunities via case studies Developing recommendations for future research priorities and implementation strategies Building a CPS constituency bringing together key players into targeted task forces to contribute to the Road2CPS action plan This will provide European organisations with the direction required to establish their future visions of CPS environments, supporting their efforts to stay at the forefront of new developments and preparing them for future challenges in the industrial application of CPSs; thus reinforcing the leading position of the European industry in CPS.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 8.15M | Year: 2009

The DIVINOCELL project will identify novel Gram-negative targets by exploiting the components of the divisome, their activities and interactions. It will also design selective assays for screening and will obtain a new class of antimicrobials: compounds to block bacterial division. New medicines to attack Gram-negative pathogens will decrease the burden of infectious disease and have a highly beneficial social and economic impact in Europe and beyond. Cell division is an essential and still underexploited process with excellent properties to yield new inhibitors to attack infection by blocking the proliferation of pathogens. Inhibitors directed against bacterial division targets, that are not present in eukaryotic cells, will be both effective and innocuous to humans and animals. In addition, as many of their structures will be based on interaction domains and synthetic scaffolds, they will generate resistance at levels lower than the present antibiotics. DIVINOCELL will apply existing and new knowledge on the molecular biology of Gram-negative cell division as well as novel analytical (nanodiscs), bioinformatic (molecular dynamics), structural (membrane protein crystals) and imaging (lanthanide staining) tools to exploit in the test tube the structures and interactions of targets in the divisome and the septum. DIVINOCELL will develop potent systematic screening assays and will use them to select compounds specifically tailored to inhibit the division of Gram-negatives (not precluding broad spectrum ones). Secondary activity and cell assays, based on the properties of bacterial division, will be generated to validate hits and advance them to leads. The medicinal properties of selected leads will be improved. The translational steps of the project will be developed by 4 SMEs in close collaboration with the 8 academic partners having well-proven expertise in molecular microbiology, protein chemistry, structural biology, biophysics, imaging and bioinformatics.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.22M | Year: 2016

Living Architecture (LIAR) is a modular bioreactor-wall, which is based on the operational principles of microbial fuel cell technology and synthetic consortia of microbes. LIAR is conceived as a next-generation selectively-programmable bioreactor and integral component of human dwelling, capable of extracting valuable resources from waste water and air, generation of oxygen and production of proteins and fiber by manipulating consortia performance. Its operational principles are grounded in distributed sensing, decentralised autonomous information processing, high-degree of fault-tolerance and distributed actuation and reconfiguration. Applications within urban systems are examined as a form of customizable micro-agriculture for installation in domestic, public (schools, hospitals) and office environments. Such a system has far reaching impacts on the building performance (resilience, resource recycling) manufacturing and design with ecosystems. The project establishes: Foundational concepts through which designed metabolisms can computationally process, recycle, remediate and synthesise valuable compounds from waste water. Transferable principles by which synthetic ecosystems can shape the environmental performance of our living spaces to increase our health, productivity and ecosystems impact. New standards for synthetic ecosystems through consortia design, engineering and optimization.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.81M | Year: 2016

The NDTonAIR consortium involves Universities, Research Organisations and major European companies working on new Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques for aerospace, of which both are key technologies. The goal is to train a new generation of scientists and engineers with a wide background of theoretical and experimental skills, capable of developing their research and entrepreneurial activities both in academy and industry and playing an active role in promoting the importance of quality inspection and structural monitoring in aerospace components. The objective of the training programme is to provide the recruited researchers with an extensive and varied training on: (1) Fundamentals skills for NDT and SHM through participation in short-courses and seminars organized by the Consortium; (2) NDT and SHM Techniques for Aerospace through research training at host institutions and participation in Workshops and Conferences organized by the Consortium and major international research associations; (3) Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship through participation in short-courses and seminars organized by the Consortium. The objective of the research programme is to consolidate and innovate current NDT and SHM techniques for Aircraft inspection by (1) investigating new physical phenomena and sensors; (2) developing analytical and numerical models to correlate the results of inspection with material properties; (3) quantifying NDT techniques through their probability of detecting reference defects; (4) developing procedures for the automatic detection and classification of defects; (5) transferring these results to industry. The members of the Consortium will work together for realizing this training programme and scientific collaboration will be stimulated by secondment of the recruited researchers and it will be aimed at improving the integration and comparison of different NDT techniques.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.1.4-4 | Award Amount: 7.53M | Year: 2012

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, lethal muscle degenerative condition arising from the absence of dystrophin in skeletal and cardiac muscles. 65% of DMD boys have out-of-frame deletions. Modulation of pre-mRNA splicing by exon skipping is the most promising molecular intervention in DMD. 2 Phase Ib and 2 Phase IIa clinical trials (MDEX Consortium in collaboration with Sarepta Therapeutics; a Dutch Consortium) demonstrated that delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to mediate exon skipping of exon 51 were able to return specific DMD mutations in-frame (~13% of all mutations) leading to new dystrophin protein expression after intramuscular and systemic delivery. The Dutch study of repeated 2-O-methylated phosphorothioate (2OMe) AO administration suggested limited efficacy after 5 weeks of treatment. Our MDEX Consortium study using a morpholino (PMO) AO demonstrated a clear dose response, robust dystrophin restoration and reduction of muscle inflammation after 12 weeks at doses up to 20mg/Kg, with no drug related adverse events. This, and preclinical studies focused on level of protein expression, clearly indicate that PMO have a superior therapeutic index compared to 2OMe. New PMOs are needed to target other DMD mutations. We will develop a PMO to skip exon 53 and perform a clinical trial in DMD boys using a world leading pan-European consortium. This will allow us to advance this class of PMO therapy in DMD by i. assessing the safety and efficacy of targeting another exon; ii. exploring the use of non-invasive techniques to monitor dystrophin restoration. This new PMO will be administered over 12 weeks in 3 groups, each of 4 DMD boys, receiving between 4 to 30mg/kg or placebo. If well tolerated, all boys will be treated for another 24 weeks at a dose of 30mg/kg. Safety and dystrophin restoration in a muscle biopsy at the end of this period will be the study endpoints. MRI, MRS and serum miRNA will be used to monitor muscle pathology non-invasively.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2017

Nanowires (NWs) exhibit unique properties that make them potential building blocks for a variety of next generation NanoElectronics devices. Recent advances have shown that NWs with predefined properties can be grown, offering a new paradigm enabling functional device prototypes including: biosensors, solar cells, transistors, quantum light sources and lasers. The critical mass of scientific knowledge gained now needs to be translated into NW technologies for industry. FP7-MC NanoEmbrace (ITN) and FUNPROB (IRSES), made substantial contributions to NW research, producing excellent scientific and technological results (>100 journal papers published) and delivered outstanding training in nanoscience and transferable skills to ESRs. Despite demonstrable scientific and technological advantages of NWs, NW-based technology concepts have not yet been translated into market-ready products, because industry and academia have not worked hand-in-hand to commercialize the research findings. Thus, it is essential that NW research is now directed towards customer-oriented scientific R&D; whilst applying innovative industrial design techniques to ensure rapid translation of the basic technologies into commercial devices. This ambitious challenge requires close collaboration between academia and the nascent NW industry, combining the efforts of scientists and engineers to address market needs. Building upon our previous achievements, a team of leading scientific experts from top institutions in Europe, strengthened by experts in innovative design and industrial partners with an excellent track record of converting cutting edge scientific ideas into market products has formed the INDEED network to address this challenge. To enhance employability, INDEED will train young ESRs to become experts with a unique skill set that includes interdisciplinary scientific techniques, industrial experience through R&D secondments and innovative design skills.


Patent
Northumbria University and Foundation University | Date: 2010-02-02

The present invention relates to the discovery of an epigenetic relay pathway that controls hepatic stellate cell activation and the wound-healing response in fibrogenesis, including fibrogenesis of the injured liver. Methods of inhibiting fibrogenesis, including liver fibrogenesis and secondary disease states and conditions thereof, and in treating liver damage, including cirrhosis of the liver (which may be caused by viruses or chemicals, including alcohol), are aspects of the present invention. The methods utilize certain nucleoside compounds and/or antibodies which are optionally conjugated. Pharmaceutical compositions represent additional aspects of the invention.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2010.5.2-3. | Award Amount: 4.29M | Year: 2011

Modern manufacturing techniques and logistics require reliable, time sensitive delivery of lower density and higher value goods. This presents a market opportunity for rail freight to grow, partly due to increasing congestion on roads, and mainly due to the need for reliable and environment friendly transport of goods. At the same time, to meet customer requirements, rail freight has to rise to the challenge of needing to be reliable and available, as well as complying with other market demands. Depending on the market segment these may be faster transport time, specialised goods systems, tracking and tracing, greater flexibility, lower prices or premium services. Furthermore in congested situations rail freight may have a competitive advantage compared to other modes of traffic.SPECTRUM will develop a railfreight train that provides a higher speed service for high value, low density and time sensitive goods with the performance characteristics of a passenger train. SPECTRUM takes a longer term, radical and first principles approach to deliver a new railfreight offering that can compete with road and air in the growing sectors of logistics where railfreight has traditionally little to offer. We shall work towards a freight train that: Behaves like a passenger train in terms of speed, acceleration, braking, momentum: allowing full scheduling on urban and sub urban train networks;Has a standardised and universal power supply system for the delivery of power to temperature controlled containers (reefers) in a controllable fashion.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SST.2013.6-1. | Award Amount: 1.84M | Year: 2013

FOSTER RAIL addresses the broad support challenges of SST.2013.6-1. Strengthening the research and innovation strategies of the transport industries in Europe. This Research action is a Level 1 Coordination and Support Action aiming at supporting the land transport European Technology Platforms activities. This action will assist ERRAC and the other transport-related European technology platforms (ETP) in defining research needs for their strategies and programmes in order to realise the objectives of the Europe-2020 strategy and further on the vision of the White Paper 2011 for a competitive and resource-efficient future transport system. This will be done in consultation with the European Commission (EC) and Member States and Associated States (MS/AS). The FOSTER RAIL workplan has been structured into 8 Work Packages (WP) which correspond to a series of logical steps with a certain degree of inter-relation that will ensure the successful outcome of the project. Especially, FOSTER RAIL will integrate the work done so far by ERRAC and its Working Groups and will further develop this. FOSTER RAIL shall build on ERRAC-ROADMAP and continue to support and enhance cooperation between stakeholders, including decision-makers, and enhanced definition of strategic research and innovation needs. As regard research and innovation targeting co-modality and other multi-modal issues, FOSTER RAIL shall address them in supportive cooperation with other transport modes. Finally, this project will be an essential support tool to provide a relevant Strategic Rail Research and Innovation Agenda as well as a Rail Business Scenario for 2050. This Railway Business Scenario shall be the reference for future research agendas and technology roadmaps to be developed in the timeframe from now on until 2050.


News Article | October 3, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

Scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas, along with their colleagues at the University of Wollongong in Australia, have drawn inspiration from the ancient art of fiber spinning in order to create ultra-strong, powerful, shape-shifting yarns. Now, the team has developed a new class of artificial muscles made from highly twisted fibers of various materials, ranging from exotic carbon nanotubes to ordinary nylon thread and polymer fishing line. Because the artificial muscles can be made in different sizes and configurations, potential applications range from robotics and prosthetics to consumer products such as smart textiles that change porosity and shape in response to temperature. A kitchen surface that cleans itself could be on the horizon, thanks to a new breakthrough by researchers from Northumbria University and Nottingham Trent University. Using experimental techniques, researchers have made the first ever direct observation of the elusive dewetting process, which takes place when a liquid film retracts to form a bead-shaped drop. The achievement could now spark a new line of research and lead to breakthroughs involving the use of liquids, such as better coatings and more effective self-cleaning surfaces.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-16-2015 | Award Amount: 6.92M | Year: 2016

PROMISS (PRevention Of Malnutrition In Senior Subjects in the EU) is a multi-country project aiming to turn the challenge of tackling malnutrition in community-dwelling older persons into an opportunity for healthy ageing for the future. The PROMISS consortium contains worldwide expertise in epidemiology, clinical trials, geriatrics, nutrition, physical activity, microbiomics, as well as in behaviour, consumer, sensory and computer sciences. It builds on strong collaborations with food industry and SMEs to strengthen innovation of the European agri-food sector and their market position. Existing data from scientifically well-established prospective aging cohorts and national nutritional surveys from Europe and third countries will be combined with new data from short- and long-term intervention studies in older persons at risk. Its holistic approach will provide insight in the causality of the links between diet, physical activity, appetite and malnutrition and underlying pathways, thereby providing the necessary evidence to develop optimal, sustainable and evidence-based dietary and physical activity strategies to prevent malnutrition and enhance active and healthy aging. PROMISS will also deliver food concepts and products as well as persuasive technology to support adherence to these strategies. The dietary and physical activity strategies and food products will be specifically developed with older user involvement to meet the needs and fit the preferences of older consumers. In close collaboration with stakeholders, PROMISS will translate these strategies into practical recommendations to guide policy and health professionals at EU- and Member States level. Dissemination and implementation takes place through strong dissemination partners operating on an European level and linked to national networks across Member States. PROMISS promises prevention of malnutrition, additional healthy life years and a strengthening of EUs food industry.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: AAT.2011.4.4-5. | Award Amount: 34.53M | Year: 2011

The All-Electric Aircraft is a major target for the next generation of aircraft to lower consumption of non-propulsive power and thus fuel burn. To eliminate hydraulic circuits, pumps and reservoirs, Electro Mechanical Actuators (EMA) are mandatory but now need to meet cost, reliability and weight requirements from the airframers. ACTUATION 2015 aims to develop and validate a common set of standardised, modular and scalable EMA resources for all actuators (flight control, high lift, main landing gear, door, thrust reverser) and all types of aircraft (business/regional/commercial airplanes and helicopters). Compared to the A320, ACTUATION 2015 will reduce the overall Life Cycle Costs of actuators by 30%, improve reliability by 30% and reduce aircraft weight by 500kg. The project relies on recent advances made in EU and national projects to integrate the required technologies (solid state power distribution, power electronics, operation in harsh conditions, jam tolerant EMA) to overcome the current barriers to EMA and mature EMA technologies to TRL 5. Standardising EMA modules (motors, power drive electronics, mechanics, sensing) will be a key enabler to succeed in achieving cost objectives and developing the supply chain. Standardisation will start during the project with the support of a standardisation body (CEN). The technical approach will be to gather detailed airframes requirements, specify a set of standard modules and develop prototypes for assessment at component and actuator level through rig tests and the virtual validation of modules. In parallel, a unified EMA design process supported by standard methods and tools will also be developed. ACTUATION 2015 will complement existing projects, notably CLEAN SKY SGO with an EMA solution, and pave the way towards the ACARE 2020 All-Electric Aircraft. ACTUATION 2015 is a 4,5 year integrated project comprising 54 partners representing the European stakeholders of the actuation and airframe sectors from 12 countries


Vollmer W.,Northumbria University | Seligman S.J.,New York Medical College
Trends in Microbiology | Year: 2010

Peptidoglycan forms a net-like sacculus made of glycan strands crosslinked by peptides. The length of the glycan strands and the degree of crosslinkage vary with bacterial species, strains and growth conditions. Several models for the three-dimensional architecture of peptidoglycan have been proposed, some of which have been tested experimentally. The new data support a layered model in Gram-negative bacteria, and a more elaborate peptidoglycan architecture, with bands made of coiled bundles of glycan strands, in the rod-shaped Bacillus subtilis. However, many questions remain unanswered and, therefore, more data and more models are required to decipher the complex cell wall architecture in bacteria. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Silberberg D.,University of Pennsylvania | Anand N.P.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Michels K.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Kalaria R.N.,Northumbria University
Nature | Year: 2015

This is an exciting time for scientific discovery that aims to reduce the frequency and impact of neurological, mental health and substance-use disorders. As it became increasingly clear that low-and middle-income countries have a disproportionate share of these disorders, and that many of the problems are best addressed by indigenous researchers who can seek context-sensitive solutions, the US National Institutes of Health and other research funders began to invest more in low-and middle-income country-focused research and research capacity-building to confront this significant public health challenge. In an effort to identify existing information, knowledge gaps, and emerging research and research capacity-building opportunities that are particularly relevant to low-and middle-income countries, in February 2014 the Center for Global Health Studies at the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center held a workshop to explore these issues with scientific experts from low-and middle-income countries and the United States. This evolved into the preparation of the Reviews in this supplement, which is designed to highlight opportunities and challenges associated with topical areas in brain-disorders research over the coming decade. This Introduction highlights some of the over-arching and intersecting priorities for addressing causes, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation as well as best practices to promote overall nervous system health. We review some brain disorders in low-and middle-income countries, while the Reviews describe relevant issues and the epidemiology of particular conditions in greater depth.This article has not been written or reviewed by Nature editors. Nature accepts no responsibility for the accuracy of the information provided.


Ziessel R.,University of Strasbourg | Harriman A.,Northumbria University
Chemical Communications | Year: 2011

Electronic energy transfer (EET) plays a critical role in many biological processes and is used by nature to direct energy to a site where chemical reactions need to be initiated. Such EET can occur over large distances and can involve many individual molecules of identical, similar or disparate chemical identity. Advances in spectroscopy and data processing have allowed the rates of EET to be measured on extremely fast timescales such that improved mechanistic insight becomes feasible. At the same time, highly sophisticated synthetic operations have been devised that facilitate the isolation and purification of elaborate multi-component molecular arrays. A key feature of these arrays concerns the logical positioning of individual units in a way that favours directed EET along the molecular axis or along some other preferred pathway. The availability of these novel molecular materials allows close examination of popular theoretical models and paves the way for the development of advanced molecular sensors, artificial light harvesters, fluorescent labels and sensitizers. Of particular interest is the spectacular growth in the application of boron dipyrromethene dyes as basic reagents in such artificial photon collectors and these compounds have dominated the market in recent years because of their synthetic versatility and valuable photophysical properties. In this article, recent developments in the field are highlighted in terms of synthesis and subsequent spectroscopic exploration. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-2-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2016

CoHERE explores the ways in which identities in Europe are constructed through heritage representations and performances that connect to ideas of place, history, tradition and belonging. The research identifies existing heritage practices and discourses in Europe. It also identifies means to sustain and transmit European heritages that are likely to contribute to the evolution of inclusive, communitarian identities and counteract disaffection with, and division within, the EU. A number of modes of representation and performance are explored in the project, from cultural policy, museum display, heritage interpretation, school curricula and political discourse to music and dance performances, food and cuisine, rituals and protest. Across an experienced, multidisciplinary consortium we take various theoretical and methodological approaches to these. Relevance to the work programme is ensured through key approaches, which are: 1) the relational study of productions and experiences of heritage at institutional, social and personal levels, including research into peoples activities and attitudes; 2) research by practice and the provision of public-facing dissemination activities; and 3) the critically-informed development of instruments (e.g. models for policy, curricula, museum and heritage practice) intended to promote reflection on and valorisation of European heritages and to engender socially-inclusive attitudes. The project is multidisciplinary, including museum, heritage and memory studies, cultural history, education, musicology, ethnology, political science, archaeology, ethnolinguistics and digital interaction design. The consortium comprises 12 partners over 9 countries, including universities, an SME, two museums and a cultural network. The research covers diverse European territories and realities comparatively and in depth.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: Shift2Rail-RIA | Phase: S2R-OC-IP5-03-2015 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2016

This proposal responds to the first Open Calls issued by the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking, as part of Shift2Rail Horizon 2020 programme. It specifically addresses the topic S2R-OC-IP5-03-2015: Intelligent freight wagon with predictive maintenance. This topic is complementary with topic S2R-CFM-IP5-02-2015: Start-up activities for Freight Automation. The INNOWAG project will work towards increasing rail freight competitiveness and the development of the next generation of lightweight and intelligent freight wagons by addressing specific challenges in the three essential areas, identified by the call, through three subsequent work streams, namely: - Work Stream 1 (WS1): Cargo condition monitoring; - Work Stream 2 (WS2): Wagon design; and - Work Stream 3 (WS3): Predictive maintenance. Moreover, INNOWAG will consider the compatibility between the solutions proposed and researched in the three areas, as well as their integration into a novel concept of wagon. The aim of the proposed INNOWAG project is to develop intelligent cargo monitoring and predictive maintenance solutions integrated on a novel concept of lightweight wagon, which would respond to major challenges in rail freight competitiveness, in relation to the increase of trans The INNOWAG project will determine how to effectively integrate innovative technologies for cargo condition monitoring into a novel high performance lightweight freight wagon, supported by effective health monitoring technologies, and predictive maintenance models for sustainable and attractive European rail freight. The development of novel technology concepts and predictive maintenance models and procedures will be separately addresses by the INNOWAG work streams. The concept underpinning the INNOWAG project relies on the actual needs of rail freight for increasing its competitiveness and attractiveness. The INNOWAG project therefore aims at developing a rail freight service that fits the needs of modern manufacturing and supply chain.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: NMP.2011.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.94M | Year: 2012

Ceramic composite materials have for many years been considered to show great promise in the repair of musculoskeletal defects. The materials can mimic the structure of bone, and devices made from the materials can be structured to closely match the mechanical requirements of implant sites. In addition, wide ranges of bioactivity are possible, from inert to fully resorbable. Bioceramics have most commonly been used to date in dentistry, and in some orthopaedic applications, e.g. as an injectable paste for vertebroplasty, or as a coating material for metal orthopaedic implants. However, advances in cellular medicine bring great opportunity for significant growth in the bioceramics industry bioceramics and bioceramic composites offer levels of bioactivity which far exceed those available from metal implants, together with combinations of strength and modulus which exceed anything which can be offered by bioactive polymers on their own. Working in tandem with cells, proteins and other biologically active agents (both from the host and introduced) bioceramic composites have the potential to revolutionise many treatments and therapies, giving new, highly effective early stage clinical interventions for conditions where no approach has existed to date. In order to deliver on the potential shown by bioceramic composites the combination of mechanical design, materials, processing, clinical delivery and subsequent biological interaction all have to be understood in an integrated and systematic way. This proposal will address this underlying research and technological challenge in order to develop new bioceramic products for five SME partner companies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-18-2015 | Award Amount: 8.19M | Year: 2016

Liver cancer in the paediatric population is rare with an incidence approximately 1-1.5 per million population. The commonest tumour seen in the childhood population is hepatoblastoma (HB), usually seen in young children and infants. Much rarer (about 10% of paediatric liver cancers) is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), usually seen in the teenage population and sometimes associated with underlying cirrhotic liver diseases. The ChiLTERN project relates to topic PHC 18 establishing effectiveness of health care interventions in the paediatric population. The ChiLTERN project builds on a unique opportunity to undertake a comprehensive research programme linked to an ambitious global partnership which will see the single largest clinical trial (the Paediatric Hepatic International Tumour Trial - PHITT) ever undertaken in this population of patients, with several randomised questions in six subgroups of patients. ChiLTERN will allow us to move towards an era of personalised therapy in which each patient will receive the correct amount of chemotherapy and will undergo has the best surgical operation (surgical resection or liver transplant). By using both clinical and biological information, we can assign patients more accurately to risk groups based on their survival. Using genetic tests and biomarkers, we will determine those children who may be at risk of developing long term side effects (deafness, heart failure, kidney damage). In addition, biomarkers will allow us to monitor during therapy and detect toxicities early before serious damage is done so that we can adapt treatment and prevent these problems. Finally, we will be using imaging technology tools which will help our surgeons plan liver operations more safely and effectively. Ultimately ChiLTERN will allow us to cure more children with liver cancer, expose fewer children to toxic chemotherapy and ensure their surgery is both effective and safe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 4.04M | Year: 2015

Reducing lead times of new medicinal drugs to the market by reducing process development and clinical testing timeframes is a critical driver in increasing European (bio)pharmaceutical industry competitiveness. Despite new therapeutic principles (e.g. the use of pluripotent stem cells, regenerative medicine and treatments based on personalised medicine or biosimilars) or regulatory initiatives to enable more efficient production, such as Quality by design (QbD) with associated Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tools , the slow progress in the development of new bioactive compounds still limits the availability of cheap and effective medicines. In addition, the competitiveness of European (bio)pharma industry is impacted by the unavailability of suitably trained personnel. Fundamental changes in the education of scientists have to be realised to address the need for changes in the traditional big pharma business model and the focus on translational medicine more early stage clinical trials with patients, more external innovation and more collaboration. These changes in education should be based on combining cutting-edge science from the early stage of product development through to manufacturing with innovation and entrepreneurship as an integral part of the training. The Rapid Bioprocess Development ITN, employing 15 ESRs, brings together industrialist and academic experts with its main aim to address this critical need by developing an effective training framework in rapid development of novel bioactive molecules from the very early stages of potency and efficacy testing to the biomanufacturing process characterisation and effective monitoring. The main focus of the research is on oncology related proteins and recombinant proteins to be used in diabetes treatment, although the resulting monitoring and modelling methods will be applicable to other bioactive molecule process development as demonstrated by validation on a range of relevant bioactives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-2-15 | Award Amount: 9.60M | Year: 2009

The MAIN AIM of the proposed integrating project NUE-CROPS is to develop knowledge, models and tools required to (a) breed/select NUTRIENT USE EFFICIENT (NUE) CROPS and (b) integrate NUE-crops with AGRONOMIC INNOVATIONS to significantly reduce fertiliser use and associated negative environmental impacts of crop production, while maintaining or improving crop yield and quality. The consortium includes 10 academic centres of excellence and 3 large breeding companies in 6 EU member states, China (an ICPC region) and the USA. The strategic CONCEPTS/OBJECTIVES of NUE-CROPS are to support the: 1. DEVELOPMENT OF NUE-VARIETIES of 4 MAJOR EUROPEAN CROPS (wheat, oilseed rape, potato, maize) for different MACROCLIMATIC REGIONS. This will be based on (a) classical QTL identification methods, (b) association genetics approaches, (c) gene expression profiling (and where appropriate proteomic, metabolomic analyses and/or analytical transformation analyses) and (d) whole plant physiological studies. R&D activities will focus on the 4 major crops species, but deliverables from studies with model plants/crops (Arabidopsis, Brassica rapa, barley) will be used as genetic bridges for the genetically complex crops wheat and oilseed rape. 2. INTEGRATION of NUE-CROPS with INNOVATIVE MANAGEMENT approaches (e.g. improved fertilisation regimes, rotational designs, winter cover crop use and, tillage systems). This will be based on: (a) field experiments to evaluate the impact of NUE crops under contrasting agronomic scenarios and (b) the construction/validation of models/algorithms for nutrient budgeting/precision farming systems 3. To ESTABLISH an EFFICIENT TRAINING and DISSEMINATION programme aimed at rapid exploitation and application of project deliverables in commercial crop production.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-01-2014 | Award Amount: 7.96M | Year: 2015

The aim of the INTO-CPS project is to create an integrated tool chain for comprehensive model-based design of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs). The tool chain will support the multidisciplinary, collaborative modelling of CPSs from requirements, through design, down to realisation in hardware and software. This will enable traceability at all stages of the development. INTO-CPS will support the holistic modelling of CPSs, allowing system models to be built and analysed that would otherwise not be possible using standalone tools. We will integrate existing industry-strength tools with high Technology Readiness Levels (TRL 69) in their application domains. The solution will be based centrally around Functional Mockup Interface (FMI)-compatible co-simulation. The project focuses on the pragmatic integration of these tools, making extensions in areas where a need has been recognised. The tool chain will be underpinned by a well-founded semantic foundations that ensures the results of analysis can be trusted. The tool chain will provide powerful analysis techniques for CPSs, including connection to SysML; generation and static checking of FMI interfaces; model checking; Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) and Software-in-the-Loop (SiL) simulation, supported by code generation. The tool chain will allow for both Test Automation (TA) and Design Space Exploration (DSE) of CPSs. The INTO-CPS technologies will be accompanied by a comprehensive set of method guidelines that describe how to adopt the INTO-CPS approach, lowering entry barriers for CPS development. The tool chain will be tested with case studies in railways, agriculture, building and automotive. The consortium has 4 academic and 7 industrial partners. The industrial partners comprise both tool vendors and case study owners. The INTO-CPS technology will enable experimenting with design alternatives enabling radical innovation where the overall concept is right first time, even when hardware prototypes does not yet exists.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 3.78M | Year: 2011

Symbiosis research is currently in the midst of a revolution as molecular techniques are leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of interactions between animals and microbes. There is an emerging recognition that all animals are intimately associated with a complex community of beneficial microbes that are essential for their development, nutrition, and health. Thus, modern symbiosis research has become a newly emerging supra-disciplinary field with novel and innovative methods for examining microbial symbionts, the vast majority of which remain as yet uncultivable. As so often when novel technologies open up new areas of research, training for students lags behind. We propose to close this gap by offering a comprehensive and innovative training in the microbial ecology and evolution of animal symbionts. The proposed ITN Symbiomics will include 14 leading research groups as well as 4 top-tier participants from the private sector to provide 14 early stage researchers (ESRs) and 1 experienced research (ER) with an interdisciplinary and synergistic training. Cutting edge methods in molecular biology and image analysis will be used to analyze a broad range of hosts from protozoan and invertebrate animal groups. Symbiomics will provide training through a combination of local and network-wide activities that will include research, secondments, workshops and courses including soft skills training, networking and meetings, regular thesis committee meetings, and mentoring. By pooling the scientific, technological, and entrepreneurial expertise of the Symbiomics partners, this ITN will provide a synergistic research environment and training that extends far beyond what each partner would be able to offer with local training alone. At the end of their training, the early stage researchers will have the skills they need for successful careers in academia and industry in a broad range of disciplines in the fields of environmental, applied, and medical microbiology.


Consumers have increasing demands for healthy, nutritious, and innovative food produced sustainably. Minor cereals can address these points, as well as contributing to feed and non-food markets. However, they have been hardly developed as commercial varieties, with no major investment to exploit genetic diversity in breeding programmes, and have low yields. There has been little research to optimise agronomy, food processing and marketing. HealthyMinorCereals will apply state of the art methods for genetic characterisation and phenotyping of >800 genotypes of 5 minor cereal species (spelt, rye, oat, einkorn and emmer). The project will select traits related to yield, nutritional quality and disease resistance, especially targeting important and emerging crop diseases, to identify well characterised genotypes for development of minor cereal varieties and cross breeding. Field experiments in 4 contrasting climatic zones in Europe will optimise agronomy within the organic and low-input sector, addressing gene x environment interactions, fertilization and potential benefits of agronomic management suited to improve yields in each country, and culminating with innovative on-farm trials. The project will investigate variation in nutritional quality of selected genotypes and analyse biological effects of seed extracts in human cell lines. Parameters of grain important for food manufacture will be investigated with optimisation of milling and other processes to maximise nutritional quality. Food industry partners will use selected minor cereal grains to develop new food products that will be demonstrated with production trials, standardisation and sensory analysis. A study on market potential will investigate factors involved in the development of minor cereals in various European markets and develop a framework for enhancing this potential. The project consortium has a major involvement of SME partners involved in breeding, farming, and food production with minor cereals.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 3.28M | Year: 2010

The main research goal of SEACOAT is to improve understanding of biointerfacial processes involved in the colonisation of surfaces by marine fouling organisms. Our vision is that this enhanced understanding will inform the future development of new, environmentally-benign materials and coatings for the practical control of marine biofouling. Our principal objective is to discover which nano- and micro-scale physico-chemical properties of surfaces influence the adhesion of fouling organisms, through the use of surface engineering technologies to fabricate coatings that vary systematically in relevant surface properties, and length scales. We will use advanced surface analytical methods to characterise test surfaces for relevant physico-chemical surface properties and how these change after immersion. Parallel adhesion bioassays using a range of representative marine organisms will test intrinsic antifouling properties of surfaces. The network is an interdisciplinary cooperative of chemists, physicists and marine biologists. Intersectoral aspects unite basic and applied scientists working in universities, a large company and an SME. The projects S&T objectives will be delivered through research in 4 main Work Packages: viz. WP1-Surface Engineering, WP2-Surface Analytics, WP3-Bioadhesion, WP4- Integration. Two additional Work Packages (WP5, WP6) will be concerned with the Dissemination of project results and the Management of the Network respectively. The aim of the Training Programme is to increase the knowledge base and experience of trainees in each of the Thematic Areas and to develop their transferable skills for future careers in industry or academia. Six training objectives will be delivered through a suite of 7 Core Skills Areas (Research Project, Advanced Training Courses, Project Conferences, International Winter Workshop, Career Development Plan, Generic Research Skills, Transferable Research Skills).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-2-08 | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2009

The aim of this supporting action is to develop a toolbox of cost-effective technologies to be implemented at the farm level to protect water from nitrate pollution. The project will bring together four partners with expertise in farm level N management in their regions. The first component of the toolbox will be a catalogue of technologies for reducing N losses on the farm produced using previous research results and local experience. Technologies will be prioritized based on their cost-effectiveness and efficiency at reducing N losses. They will be listed according to region and production-system to enable easy identification of the best management option for specific local conditions. The second toolbox component will be an enhanced decision support tool (NDICEA) which can be used at the farm level to illustrate options for improved N management, and assist farmers in reaching their goals of compliance with the Nitrates Directive. NDICEA was developed by LBI, and will be enhanced using outputs from ongoing and previous projects at partners UAa and UNEW. The toolbox will be implemented on case study farms and the results documented in a blueprint for implementing water protection policy at the farm level across the EU. Project results will be widely available via the project website, and through links with the WFD-CIRCA Information Exchange Platform and the Water Information System for Europe (WISE)-RTD webportal. A stakeholder workshop will be conducted at the end of the project to transfer technology to key user groups (farmers, advisors, water protection policy makers). N-TOOLBOX will serve as a centralized resource that can be expanded as new measures and tools are developed. In this way N-TOOLBOX will lay the foundations for improved implementation of water protection policy at the farm level across the EU.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-3 | Award Amount: 7.91M | Year: 2012

Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is preventable by sustained changes in diet and physical exercise. Despite this, modern societies are already approaching 10% population prevalence of diabetes, and another 15% with pre-diabetes. The costs of T2DM are huge, approaching 10% of all health costs. Prevention of diabetes is a priority for national healthcare agencies and for the health insurance industry. Investment in prevention and lifestyle programmes requires a solid evidence-base for targeting and customising these interventions in a cost-effective manner. Translation of the findings from T2DM prevention studies to the benefit of general public health has not yet been possible. DEXLIFE will identify novel diagnostic and predictive biomarkers (i) to detect the progression toward diabetes in high risk individuals and (ii) that are responsive to lifestyle interventions known to be effective in diabetes prevention. New biomarkers alone will be insufficient to alter the course of diabetes progression. We bring a strong translational focus to this proposal, by setting the main intervention in the real-life context of a major health insurance system. The accumulated phenotyping repertoire from an extensive panel of omic analyses will be refined and modelled into a new diagnostic panel for the allocation of high risk subjects to individualised preventive regimens. Our multi-disciplinary team has a strong track record in clinical diabetes and metabolism. Several unique clinical cohorts will provide the basis for a series of clinical, physiological and mechanistic investigations, which will identify, monitor and analyse the impact of biomarkers over time. An exercise and dietary intervention study will be included in two specific cohorts, enabling us to assess the impact of such interventions on plasma biomarkers and functional tissue-based markers. Project clinical and industry partners will support the translation of our findings into clinical practice.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2009.2.1.2 | Award Amount: 10.05M | Year: 2010

Improving the cost-competitiveness and approaching grid-parity are the major challenges for micromorph thin-film photovoltaics. This project tackles major factors relating to micromorph module efficiency and production cost by assessing the influences of glass, TCO and silicon deposition (including in-situ cleaning). The project bridges the gap between research and industrial application by executing new developments and improvements in the field of TCO and PECVD reactors and processes and transferring them to production plants where the full impact on module efficiency and costs can be evaluated. On the other hand it also takes some innovations already used in other applications like different glass types and F2 as cleaning gas and transfers these improvements into the photovoltaic application. While different glass types have a high impact on production cost of solar modules, the utilisation of F2 as cleaning gas also has high impact on cost by increasing cleaning rates and decreasing gas cost and also has a strong environmental impact by replacing cleaning gases with a higher global warming potential. All these approaches will not only be developed in parallel but this project will ensure a strong interlink between these activities, e. g. the impact of narrow gap reactors on the F2 cleaning rate. The joint goal of the different work packages is the demonstration of a 157Wp micromorph module with a cost of ownersip (CoO) reduced to 0.5/Wp. Succeeding in this project will ensure the competitiveness of the micromorph technology and further approach the final goal of grid parity. Having European companies jointly engaged in this project will ensure key players in this important technology branch in Europe, therefore strengthening the European economy. The consortium is comprised of seven partners from four European countries and includes 3 Universities and 4 industrial companies (1 equipment supplier, 1 gas supplier and 2 producers of solar modules).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SST-2007-3.1-01;SST-2007-3.1-02 | Award Amount: 1.24M | Year: 2008

NICHES\ aims to network actors engaged in developing innovative urban transport concepts. This proposal relates to the successful previous NICHES project, with similar objectives, but different topics. Both share the mission to stimulate a debate on innovative urban transport between stakeholders from different sectors, to promote the most promising new concepts from their current niche position to a mainstream urban transport application. NICHES\ will explore innovative urban transport concepts, which are high on the European & local agenda, while also looking into the needs of its potential users and implementers, i.e. concepts to increase accessibility to urban mobility options; concepts to increase the use & efficiency of infrastructure & interchanges; concepts to exploit functionalities of urban traffic management centres; concepts for automated & space efficient transport. These topics add to the work started under NICHES, which already examined a set of innovative concepts and successfully promoted them. NICHES\ will collect information & encourage networking by gathering urban transport experts in Working Group meetings. Selected concepts will be looked at in terms of their transferability to ensure wider replication. The project will develop policy notes for decision makers, implementation scenarios for selected cities and site visit programmes to promote the concepts. Recommendations for further research on urban transport innovation will be formulated. The project will work directly with cities, developing implementation scenarios for integrating innovative concepts in urban policies and move from the development of innovative mobility solutions to practical implementation. The added value of funding NICHES\, which can build on the basis of its predecessor project NICHES, is that a substantial coordination platform for innovative urban transport will continue to expand. Synergies between the 2 projects will help to achieve results in a very efficient way.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: GC.SST.2011.7-4. | Award Amount: 4.01M | Year: 2012

The SMARTFUSION public-private partnership (PPP) will build upon existing urban freight development strategies of three demonstration regions and to demonstrate smart urban freight solutions on co-operative and sustainable city distribution in urban interurban supply chains. Leading idea is to introduce the concept of the European Green Car Initiative in the last mile operations, introduce innovative technology developments in the field of urban freight planning, vehicle technology and urban inter urban transhipment and to develop comprehensive and transferable impact assessment models for smart urban freight solutions. The main objectives can be summarized as follows: to enhance the innovation process at urban-interurban interfaces, to demonstrate and evaluate the technical and logistical feasibility of introducing electric vehicles and the second generation of hybrid truck technology into existing business supply chains and to apply these vehicle technologies in conjunction with information technology, operational, managerial and regulatory innovations including urban consolidation centres and telematics systems. to determine the critical success factors in stimulating the market uptake of new sustainable vehicle technology and other innovations in the urban logistics environment. to develop a Smart Urban Designer tool that allows the other city-regions and company supply chains to analyse the likely success and benefits of applying these innovations in their domain. The project has a clear view as to the main goals for all the public and private partners, but we also recognise that the exact nature of the innovations and the demonstrations, between the demonstrations and the assessments needs to be localised in each demonstrator. Therefore we begin with 80% of the proposal clearly envisaged, but it is essential to address the crucial 20% through concertation and consensus.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2010-5.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.27M | Year: 2011

Migration is a key word that indicates a complex condition of contemporary society, in which mobility doesnt only pertain to people, but to objects, information and knowledge too. Hence, the age of migrations that MeLa adopts as its framework reflects a set of global processes that do not only involve the transnationalization of labor, but also the refashioning of the cultural and political spheres under the impact of todays global mobility. In this context, the main objective of MeLa is to define innovative museum practices that reflect the challenges of the contemporary processes of globalization, mobility and migration. To succeed in its intentions MeLa will devise strategies for museums to enhance the European cultural heritage, both tangible and intangible, and turn it into an effective agent of shared forms of citizenship and identity building. At the core of the MeLa research, in fact, lies the idea that shared values, memories and identities can drive a change in European museums and turn them into crucial venues for the contemporary age of migrations. This process implies a redefinition of the museums ways of organizing and representing their collections in order to encompass a complex variety of voices and subjects. This strategy brings out the concepts of multiplicity (of voices, points of view, theories, etc.) and hybridity (of forms and physical expressions in architecture and exhibition settings) that operate in contemporary culture, and exploits them to create truly democratic forms of European citizenship. On an operative level, MeLa is characterized by an innovative research methodology that entails the use of both traditional and experimental research tools, like brainstorming sessions, research by art and research by design activities. The project involves nine European partners with different yet complementary fields of expertise: five universities, two museums, a research institute and a small companythey will all participate in the research activities with a collaborative approach. Public events and art exhibitions will be organized to provide stimuli to the research activities and share their process findings, bringing together experts from different museums sectors, scholars and artists. Beside resulting in traditional critical reflections, the theories, methodologies and proposals developed by the research will be tested in experimental pilot projects of virtual of real exhibitions. The research findings will finally coalesce into scientific publications and policy briefs for the use of the European Union and the museum community. (Mela is the Sanskrit word for gathering or meeting; today it is referred to intercultural encounters, intended as opportunities for community building).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2010.3.1.1-4 | Award Amount: 2.46M | Year: 2011

The WHaTeR project aims to contribute to the development of appropriate water harvesting techniques (WHTs). These WHTs should be sustainable under dynamic global and regional pressure, and strengthen rainfed agriculture, improve rural livelihood and increase food production and security in Sub-Saharan Africa. In total 3 European and 5 African organisations will be involved; namely VU University Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Newcastle University (United Kingdom), Stockholm Resilience Centre (Sweden), University of Kwazulu Natal (South Africa), Sokoine University (Tanzania), Southern and Eastern Africa Rainwater Network (Kenya), National Institute for Environment and Agricultural Research (Burkina Faso) and Arba Minch University (Ethiopia). Project activities will be divided over 14 Work Packages. The first Work Package covers project management and the second comprises a situation analysis - through revisits to water harvesting sites in 15 African countries studied previously by participating organisations . The next four Work Packages focus on detailed research and technology development activities on cross-cutting themes (environmental sustainability; technology development; livelihood improvement; uptake and upscaling; and global and regional impact) and will be conducted together with four country-based Work Packages (in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, South Africa and Tanzania). One Work Package will concentrate on stakeholder communication and outreaching activities, and the final Work Packages consists of synthesis and dissemination of project results, inclduing production of guidelines for WHTs. The project will spend an estimated 74% of the budget on RTD, 13% on other costs related to stakeholder workshops and outreaching and 13% on project management. The expected impacts of the project comprise technology support for farmers, development of stakeholder communication networks, innovative water harvesting systems, tools for impact assessment, upstream-downstream land use, and policy support for integrated water management and adaptation to climate change to promote EU and African strategies on strengthening rainfed agriculture, food security and livelihoods.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.1 | Award Amount: 4.33M | Year: 2010

Within previous European projects with major contributions by the current proposers, process simulation has been brought to a state which allows in industrial environments a sufficiently accurate simulation of doping profiles in advanced CMOS technologies. Important electrical characteristics of core CMOS devices can now be predicted from scratch or with a minimum calibration effort. However, concepts towards low-power electronics, smart power applications, CMOS image sensors, and CMOS derivatives providing extra functionalities are still not sufficiently supported by TCAD. This concerns especially the prediction of leakage currents in such or parasitic devices caused by electrically active defects that remain after processing, and alternative doping techniques like plasma immersion ion implantation, low-temperature implantation, diversified cocktail implants and laser annealing which are considered for low-leakage ultra shallow junctions. The lack of suitable models that can be used in the early stages of industrial R&D inhibits the necessary cost reduction in the development of devices for which Europe is still at the forefront. Our project will develop the full set of missing models and implement and include them into the Sentaurus TCAD platform of Synopsys so that they are of immediate value to the European semiconductor industry. The integrated models will finally be evaluated by STMicroelectronics with respect to industrial needs. To reach these ambitious goals, a consortium of European companies active in complementary fields of competence (STMicroelectronics: device manufacturing, Synopsys: TCAD software, Exico, IBS: equipment production, Probion, Semilab: characterization) and leading European research institutes (CNR-IMM, CNRS-LAAS/CEMES, ETH-Zurich, Fraunhofer-IISB, Univ. Newcastle) has been formed which, together, is well prepared to expertly cover all fields from experiment via characterization and modelling to simulation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SiS.2013.2.2.3-1 | Award Amount: 2.48M | Year: 2014

The project aims to research the use of technology in formative assessment classroom practices in ways that allow teachers to respond to the emerging needs of low achieving learners in mathematics and science so that they are better motivated in their learning of these important subjects. This international project will adapt and develop existing research-informed pedagogical interventions (developed by the partners), suited to implementation at scale, for working with low attaining pupils and transforming teaching. The project will seek to: report the differences in the way that systemic structures influence the trajectories of lower achieving students within the participating countries; identify their typical pathways through the school system and reveal the educational opportunities that are open to these students. It will report on the varying assessment tools that are used to identify lower achieving students and may determine these pathways, with attention paid to the different interpretations of low achievement in each country. This project aims to: foster high quality interactions in international classrooms that are instrumental in raising achievement for low achievers; expand our knowledge of technologically enhanced teaching and assessment methods addressing low achievement in mathematics and science Major objectives for the project are to: offer approaches for the use of new technologies to support the formative assessment of lower achieving students. develop sustainable teaching practices that improve attainment in M&S for the targeted students. produce a toolkit for teachers to support the development of practice and a professional development resource to support it disseminate the outcomes


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 2.63M | Year: 2017

The Translational Research Network for Prostate Cancer (TransPot) program adopts an innovative, multidisciplinary approach, providing highly sought-after, effective solutions for incurable prostate cancer (PC). The TransPot scientific objective is to obtain an unmatched depth of molecular, mechanistic and informatics systems-level disease understanding in order to improve the prognosis and treatment of lethal PC, aimed to (i) provide important insights into molecular mechanisms driving treatment resistant PC including castrate-resistant PC (CRPC), (ii) identify novel therapeutic targets, (iii) develop and validate predictive models for disease progression, prognosis and responsiveness to current and novel (co-)treatment options, and (iv) provide superior, clinically relevant tools and biomarker signatures for personalising and optimising CRPC therapy. Our research program is built on network-wide, state-of-the-art cancer biology-based mechanistic research integrated with a systems medicine approach: 1. Cancer biology-based mechanistic research incorporating a comprehensive range of model systems incorporating unique, pre-clinical and clinical resources and distinct phenotypic high content screen platforms. 2. A systems medicine approach with mathematical modelling to develop novel predictive/prognostic tools. 3. Centres of excellence in surgery, oncology and clinical trials, comprising clinical infrastructure and essential resources whereby candidate therapeutic targets and predictive/prognostic tools can be comprehensively evaluated, including accessing bio-repository resources. We will train young scientists to apply multiple omics technologies and approaches in model systems and systems biology to answer important clinically-relevant questions. Advances achieved will facilitate personalized targeted-medicine in treating lethal PC, and will impact beyond the scientific community by improving the well-being of advanced PC patients.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-2.4.4-1 | Award Amount: 7.54M | Year: 2009

The rapidly expanding knowledge of NMDs genetic diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapeutic possibilities has provided new targets for disease characterisation, early diagnosis, drug discovery and development as well as has raised many questions about how to translate this knowledge into clinical practice as (initial) clinical trials typically run for such a short time that clinical improvement can hardly be expected within that time frame. This militates for the discovery of surrogate endpoints for establishing the efficacy of clinical trials. The concept of biomarkers represents measurable bio-parameters able to flank the process of diagnosis, functional characterisation and therapy in NMDs. OMIC sciences (genomic, transcriptomics, proteomics) offer opportunities to identify biomarkers for finely defining and tuning the NMDs bases. This approach can make available non-invasive biomarkers, to be used for monitoring disease progression, prognosis and drugs response, therefore optimising the choice of appropriate and often personalised therapies. Validated biomarkers will increase therapy efficiency (meaning optimal dose of drug to get responders) and efficacy (responders vs non responders for example if we will identify genomic biomarkers linked to the lack of any therapeutic effect). In this case we could address a truly efficacious therapy (avoiding inefficacious treatment due to unfavourable genomic contexts). The new genomic and proteomic biomarkers discovered within BIO-NMD will be validated both in animal models and in human samples, before entering into a qualification process at the EMEA. The qualified biomarkers resulting from the BIO-NMD project will be ready for ongoing and further clinical trials for the patient benefit. This will increase the therapy efficacy and efficiency and also reduce adverse effects, with impact on patients quality of life with also economical relevance. The BIO-NMD consortium is led by the University of Ferrara, an internationally recognised university in the field of genomics of hereditary neuromuscular disorders. In addition the consortium is composed of 7 leading European academic partners bringing their expertise in all OMIC sciences as well as in bio-informatics and patient sample collection, 1 SME providing its skills in bio-informatics and 1 global company specialised in the development of patient samples screening.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST.2011.1.1-4. | Award Amount: 7.39M | Year: 2012

For many transport modes, energy reduction strategies can be effectively formulated at the level of the vehicle or vessel. New technologies can therefore be introduced to a vehicle and the direct energy savings can be readily quantified. However, such approach is not suitable to be employed for urban rail, where it is not sufficient to consider only the energy performance of vehicles; the energy associated with the infrastructure, as well as the influence of the mode of operation are to be considered too. In other words, urban rail systems are complex environments and their energy consumption is characterised by a wide range of inter-dependent factors. This means that it is often extremely difficult to assess the net benefits of introducing new energy saving technologies. For example, whilst a new technology might yield improvements in certain respects, it might also compromise other aspects of system performance. What is needed, and what has been lacking so far, is a holistic approach for the reduction of energy consumption for urban rail systems embracing vehicles, infrastructure and operation, as is proposed by OSIRIS. The project will start from the definition of Key Performance Indicators and Standard Duty Cycles to measure energy consumption in urban rail systems. Then, rather than focussing only on specific technologies, it will address the issue from the system-level ensuring that progresses on energy reduction are substantial. The effectiveness of solutions and their full potential will be proven by means of simulations and pilot tests. OSIRIS will introduce the entire discovered knowledge into a Decision Support Tool, for strategic decision making of companies (i.e., operators) and governments (i.e., public authorities). OSIRIS is fully aligned with the political ambitions of the Framework Program described in activity 7.2 - SUSTAINABLE SURFACE TRANSPORT of the FP7 4th call, topic SST.2011.1.1-4: Energy consumption reduction in urban rail systems.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2012

Ageing is an inexorable homeostatic failure of largely unknown aetiology that leads to increased vulnerability to disease limiting the quality of life in the elderly and creating high costs to the society. Until recently, the daunting complexity of the ageing process, the conspicuous lack of tools to study it, and a dearth of experimentally tractable model systems have greatly hindered any hypothesis-driven reductionist approaches to understand the molecular basis of ageing. Whereas molecular and cellular damage is thought to be a cause of ageing and age-related pathologies, little is known about the molecular events that underlie ageing or determine longevity. A large number of progeroid syndromes that are characterized by an early onset of age-related pathology are linked to inborn defects in genome maintenance thus pointing towards damage in (nuclear) DNA as a major culprit of ageing and age-related pathology. DNA damage fuelled by intrinsic and environmental sources of genotoxic insult and by errors of genome maintenance mechanisms invariably accumulates with advancing age. The outcome of DNA damage is diverse and generally adverse: DNA lesions may physically obstruct essential processes including DNA replication and transcription. In addition, DNA damage activates checkpoint responses that lead to a reduction in cell proliferation potential (cellular senescence) or to an increase in cell death. As a result, depending on the type and severity of DNA injuries and the cellular response to DNA damage, these cellular mechanisms impair organ maintenance and function during ageing. The CodAge ITN proposes an integrated approach in studying the role of Chronic DNA damage in Ageing and age-related pathology.

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