Espanola, NM, United States
Espanola, NM, United States

Northern New Mexico College is an American public college in Española, New Mexico. Wikipedia.


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Li M.,Yunnan Normal University | Ji X.,Yunnan Normal University | Li G.,Yunnan Normal University | Wei S.,Yunnan Normal University | And 2 more authors.
Applied Energy | Year: 2011

The performances of solar cell arrays based on a Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system have been studied via both experiment and theoretical calculation. The I- V characteristics of the solar cell arrays and the output performances of the TCPV/T system demonstrated that among the investigated four types of solar cell arrays, the triple junction GaAs cells possessed good performance characteristics and the polysilicon cells exhibited poor performance characteristics under concentrating conditions. The optimum concentration ratios for the single crystalline silicon cell, the Super cells and the GaAs cells were also studied by experiments. The optimum concentration ratios for the single crystalline silicon cells and Super cells were 4.23 and 8.46 respectively, and the triple junction GaAs cells could work well at higher concentration ratio. Besides, some theoretical calculations and experiments were performed to explore the influences of the series resistances and the working temperature. When the series resistances Rs changed from 0. Ω to 1. Ω, the maximum power Pm of the single crystalline silicon, the polycrystalline silicon, the Super cell and the GaAs cell arrays decreased by 67.78%, 74.93%, 77.30% and 58.07% respectively. When the cell temperature increased by 1. K, the short circuit current of the four types of solar cell arrays decreased by 0.11818. A, 0.05364. A, 0.01387. A and 0.00215. A respectively. The research results demonstrated that the output performance of the solar cell arrays with lower series resistance was better and the working temperature had a negative impact on the current under concentration. In addition, solar irradiation intensity had certain effects on the solar cell's performance. For the crystalline silicon solar cell arrays, when the solar direct radiation exceeded a certain value, the I- V curves almost became a straight line and the output performances decreased due to the high series resistance leading to the high power loss. For the triple junction GaAs solar cell array, its performance was always excellent. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A list of the nation’s Best Electrician Programs for 2016-2017 has been released by the Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org). As a leader in higher education information and resources for students, the site ranked schools offering on-campus or online electrician programs to find those providing the best overall value for students. Top finishers include Idaho State University, Great Basin College, Jackson College, Montana State University Northern and the College of Southern Nevada among four-year schools and East Mississippi Community College, Hinds Community College, Rockingham Community College, Augusta Technical College and Beaufort County Community College among two-year schools. “The need for qualified electricians is growing, and the programs on our list represent the best training opportunities for this in-demand trade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Our analysis shows students where to find the best combination of quality and affordability when it comes to earning an electrician degree.” The Community for Accredited Online Schools weighs over a dozen different data points, including statistics on cost, program features, graduation rates and more to determine a score for each electrician program in the country. To qualify for the Best Electrician Program lists, schools must also meet specific minimum requirements: institutions must be accredited public or private not-for-profit entities and must provide career placement assistance to students. A complete list of schools included on the Best Electrician Programs list is included below. To learn where each school ranks and for more information on the data analysis and methodology used, visit: Recognized as the Best Electrician Programs among two-year schools: Recognized as the Best Electrician Programs among four-year schools: Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology Bismarck State College Bluefield State College Brazosport College Capitol College College of Southern Nevada Daytona State College Dunwoody College of Technology Fairmont State University Florida State College at Jacksonville Great Basin College Gulf Coast State College Idaho State University Indian River State College Jackson College Kentucky State University Lake Washington Institute of Technology Lake-Sumter State College Lawrence Technological University LeTourneau University Missouri Western State University Montana State University-Northern New England Institute of Technology Northern Michigan University Northern New Mexico College Northwestern Michigan College Northwestern State University of Louisiana Palm Beach State College Pennsylvania College of Technology Pensacola State College Pittsburg State University Point Park University Rochester Institute of Technology Seattle Community College - North Campus Seminole State College of Florida South Florida State College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Canton SUNY College of Technology at Delhi University of Akron Main Campus University of Arkansas - Fort Smith University of Cincinnati - Main Campus University of Hartford Utah Valley University Valencia College Wayne State University West Virginia University at Parkersburg West Virginia University Institute of Technology Western New Mexico University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The nation’s Best Construction Management Degree Programs have been ranked by leading online higher education resource site Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org). Comparing data from both online and on-campus programs at two- and four-year schools respectively, the lists determine which schools provide the best overall Construction Management training for 2016-2017. Top scoring four-year schools include the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Utah Valley University, Florida State College at Jacksonville, College of Southern Nevada and Roger Williams University; top scoring two-year schools include Metropolitan Community College, Piedmont Community College, Cape Fear Community College, Edmonds Community College and Santa Fe Community College. “Construction management is a great degree for those interested in advancing their career in architecture, design or a variety of skilled trades,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “As student demand increases, the number of schools offering formal construction management degrees also rises, making our analysis of each program around the country extremely beneficial for college-bound students.” More than a dozen different school-specific metrics, from graduation rates to student-teacher ratios, are weighed against one another to determine the Best Construction Management Degree Programs in the country. Colleges must also meet a handful of standard guidelines to qualify for the AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org list; institutions are required to be accredited public or private not-for-profit entities. Each must also offer students career placement assistance or services. All schools named on the 2016-2017 Best Construction Management Degree Programs in the U.S. list are included below. Specific details on data and methodology used, as well as ranking order for each list can be found at the following link: Albany Technical College Arizona Western College Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Bossier Parish Community College Cabrillo College Cape Fear Community College Central Community College Central New Mexico Community College College of the Canyons College of the Desert Community College of Allegheny County Cosumnes River College Delaware County Community College Delta College Diablo Valley College Edmonds Community College Erie Community College Frederick Community College Gwinnett Technical College Harrisburg Area Community College - Harrisburg Inver Hills Community College Ivy Tech Community College Joliet Junior College Laney College Lee College Lorain County Community College Mesa Community College Metropolitan Community College Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College North Hennepin Community College Northland Pioneer College Parkland College Pickens Technical College Piedmont Community College Pitt Community College Prince George's Community College Rowan-Cabarrus Community College San Diego Mesa College Santa Fe Community College Savannah Technical College Sinclair College South Suburban College Texas State Technical College - Waco The Community College of Baltimore County Trinidad State Junior College Ventura College Victor Valley College Washburn Institute of Technology Washtenaw Community College Wilkes Community College Bowling Green State University - Main Campus Brazosport College Broward College Central Washington University College of Southern Nevada CUNY New York City College of Technology Drexel University Dunwoody College of Technology Eastern Michigan University Farmingdale State College Ferris State University Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Florida State College at Jacksonville Indian River State College John Brown University Kennesaw State University Lawrence Technological University Mississippi State University Missouri Western State University Montana State University - Northern Morgan State University Navajo Technical University North Dakota State University - Main Campus Northern Michigan University Northern New Mexico College Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City Pensacola State College Philadelphia University Pittsburg State University Pratt Institute – Main Campus Roger Williams University Seminole State College of Florida Snow College State College of Florida-Manatee - Sarasota SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Delhi The University of Montana University of Akron Main Campus University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Minnesota - Twin Cities University of Oklahoma - Norman Campus Utah State University Utah Valley University Valencia College Weber State University Western Carolina University Youngstown State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


Torres D.,Northern New Mexico College | Crichigno J.,Northern New Mexico College | Padilla G.,Northern New Mexico College | Rivera R.,Northern New Mexico College
Renewable Energy | Year: 2014

To address the increase of electricity demand, the need for reducing carbon dioxide, and the reduction of available fossil fuel resources, renewable energy sources are being recruited. Specifically energy generated by photovoltaic (PV) cells is becoming one of the most promising alternatives. In this context, this paper presents an optimization model for the scheduling problem where conventional and photovoltaic sources of energy are scheduled to be delivered to satisfy energy demand. The optimization model is formulated as a Linear Program (LP) with a bounded number of variables and constraints. The respective solution can be obtained in polynomial time and provides the optimal combination or schedule of energy generated from different sources (conventional, renewable and battery storage) such that the total demand is satisfied and the profit is maximized. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness and the generality of the scheme. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Fry H.C.,Argonne National Laboratory | Garcia J.M.,Northern New Mexico College | Medina M.J.,Northern New Mexico College | Ricoy U.M.,Northern New Mexico College | And 4 more authors.
Journal of the American Chemical Society | Year: 2012

Long fibers assembled from peptide amphiphiles capable of binding the metalloporphyrin zinc protoporphyrin IX ((PPIX)Zn) have been synthesized. Rational peptide design was employed to generate a peptide, c16-AHL 3K3-CO2H, capable of forming a β-sheet structure that propagates into larger fibrous structures. A porphyrin-binding site, a single histidine, was engineered into the peptide sequence in order to bind (PPIX)Zn to provide photophysical functionality. The resulting system indicates control from the molecular level to the macromolecular level with a high order of porphyrin organization. UV/visible and circular dichroism spectroscopies were employed to detail molecular organization, whereas electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy aided in macromolecular characterization. Preliminary picosecond transient absorption data are also reported. Reduced hemin, (PPIX)FeII, was also employed to highlight the material's versatility and tunability. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Campus Cyberinfrastrc (CC-NIE) | Award Amount: 350.00K | Year: 2015

Northern New Mexico College (Northern) is establishing a dedicated research network fabric and Science DMZ that is: 1) connecting multiple teaching and research laboratories serving biology, chemistry, environmental science, and engineering; and 2) improving the capacity and efficiency of moving Terabytes (TBs) of data sets.

The proposed network upgrades are permitting faculty and students to engage in high-throughput data analysis research. High-speed switches are allowing TBs of data transfers from storage nodes to multiple labs, including solar energy variables needed to analyze irradiance and solar power generation patterns; data sets of 3-D convection simulation computed by Northerns Aguila parallel Supercomputer; and TBs of ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequencing needed to understand the role of Cajal Bodies in the biogenesis of non-coding RNA in land plants.

Northern serves a 72% Hispanic and 11% Native American student population. Northern?s recent development of Engineering, Biology, and Environmental Science programs has greatly increased access to four-year STEM degrees for northern New Mexicans. This CC*DNI project represents the next step in closing the STEM education gap that prevents Hispanics, the fastest growing ethnic group in the nations labor force, and Native Americans from entering STEM professions. The remote experimental control features to lab equipment are also addressing the geographic challenge of campus access for students living in remote mountain villages, especially during winter months, and is allowing for the development of remote undergraduate research experiences known to support the success of minority populations studying STEM.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: NSF INCLUDES | Award Amount: 299.78K | Year: 2016

Abstract: We aim to disrupt the multigenerational cycle of poverty in our rural indigenous (18% Native American and 82% Hispanic) community by training our successful college students to serve as role models in our schools. Poverty has led to low educational aspirations and expectations that plague our entire community. As such, its disruption requires a collective effort from our entire community. Our Collective unites two local public colleges, 3 school systems, 2 libraries, 1 museum, 1 national laboratory and four local organizations devoted to youth development. Together we will focus on raising aspirations and expectations in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) topics, for STEM deficiencies among 9th graders place them at risk of dropping out while STEM deficiencies among 11th and 12th graders preclude them from pursuing STEM majors in college and therefore from pursuing well paid STEM careers. We will accomplish this by training, placing, supporting, and assessing the impact of, an indigenous STEM mentor corps of successful undergraduate role models. By changing STEM aspirations and expectations while heightening their own sense of self-efficacy, we expect this corps to replenish itself and so permanently increase the flow of the state?s indigenous populations into STEM majors and careers ? in line with NSF?s mission to promote the progress of science while advancing the national health, prosperity and welfare.

Our broader goal is to focus the talents and energies of a diverse collective of community stakeholders on the empowerment of its local college population to address and solve a STEM disparity that bears directly on the community?s well-being in a fashion that is generalizable to other marginalized communities. The scope of our project is defined by six tightly coupled new programs: three bringing indigenous STEM mentors to students, one training mentors, one training mentees to value and grow their network of mentors, and one training teachers to partner with us in STEM. The intellectual merit of our project lies not only in its assertion that authentic STEM mentors will exert an outsize influence in their communities while increasing their own sense of self-efficacy, but in the creation and careful application of instruments that assess the factors that determine teens? attitudes, career interests, and behaviors toward a STEM future; and mentors? sense of self development and progress through STEM programs. More precisely, evaluation of the programs has the potential to clarify two important questions about the role of college-age mentors in schools: (1) To what degree is the protege?s academic performance and perceived scholastic competence mediated by the mentor?s impact on (a) the quality of the protege?s parental relationship and (b) the social capital of the allied classroom teacher; (2) To what degree does the quality of the student mentor?s relationships with faculty and peers mediate the impact of her serving as mentor on her self-efficacy, academic performance, and leadership skills?


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBERT NOYCE SCHOLARSHIP PGM | Award Amount: 1.15M | Year: 2010

Four cohorts each consisting of four undergraduate STEM majors are being offered annual scholarships of $12,000 for up to three years to complete the STEM baccalaureate degree and receive secondary teacher certification. Five cohorts of three individuals already possessing a STEM degree are receiving one year scholarships of $10,000 each to gain teaching certification via the Alternate Licensure program. Over the five year project period a total of 77 one year scholarships are being awarded to 31 individuals. Each year five summer internships are available to lower division undergraduates to actively participate in the organization, planning and implementation of informal science outreach activities with the aim of attracting these students into a teaching career.
Currently the institution produces about 8 science teachers a year through the regular teacher education program and about 4 science teachers a year through the alternative licensure program. This project is having a broad impact on the number of science teachers produced who are able to teach primarily in the rural areas of New Mexico. These teachers provide high quality science education to at least 500 students annually and infuse the cadre of STEM teachers with highly trained individuals grounded in both content and pedagogical knowledge who provide junior high and high school students the opportunity to participate in inquiry-based, experiential learning.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2016

Northern New Mexico College serves a 77% underrepresented minority and underprepared population with high attrition rates in the first two years. The College of Engineering and Technology is developing a research-generated knowledge base of how this student demographic best learns complex foundational Physical Science concepts by using the evidence-based Wright State model to create an introductory Physics course with project based activities that students will take prior to a theory-based Physics course. Students are being tracked to determine if this intervention leads to increases in learning, ability to apply concepts, and retention. Additionally, Native American and Hispanic students with high degrees of interdependent self-construal are being studied to determine if they respond better to active learning prior to theoretical learning.

The investigators will use a matched subjects samples methodology and a modification of the Solomon four-group research design. In addition, undergraduate research experiences are being studied to determine if they foster retention and greater clarity on future career pathways among these unique populations. The project expects to generate new scientific knowledge of effective interventions leading to retention in engineering among students from rural and tightly knit communities. For example, advances in understanding of how under-prepared populations best learn; contributions to education research regarding effective practices in engineering teaching and learning among understudied groups; and discoveries on successful strategies that can broaden participation of Native Americans, Hispanics and women in engineering programs. The proposed work is likely to produce a model that can be disseminated to other institutions facing similar challenges, or those that are focusing on diversifying engineering undergraduate population in their programs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 621.71K | Year: 2013

This project is supporting over 50 academically talented students with demonstrated financial need in attaining baccalaureate degrees in Engineering at Northern New Mexico College (NNMC). Cohort-building and academic-support activities for scholars include faculty mentoring, peer tutoring, participation in engineering-focused first-year experiences and community service, career- and graduate-school awareness events, and opportunities to participate in undergraduate research related to the Solar Energy Research Park and Academy, Northern New Mexico Cisco Networking Academy, and partnerships with the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The intellectual merit of the project lies in its comprehensive approach to recruitment and support of scholars in a young, vibrant engineering department that has built strong connections to industry and other educational institutions in the region. Broader impacts include promotion of student success in this impoverished, rural region. 80% of NNMC students are first-generation-in-college, 83% are Hispanic, and 9% Native American. This program is thus expanding and diversifying the engineering workforce in the region, as well as providing a model approach for consideration by similar institutions.

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