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Vasala M.,Kainuu Central Hospital | Hallanvuo S.,Finnish Food Safety Authority | Ruuska P.,Northern Finland Laboratory Center NordLab | Suokas R.,Kainuu Central Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2013

Objective: We describe the epidemiological and microbiological process in the clearing of a foodborne outbreak of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis O:1 linked to raw carrots and frequency of the associated reactive extra-gastrointestinal manifestations. Methods: The patient samples were investigated by routine culture or antibody testing methods. The real-time bacterial PCR was used to detect Y pseudotuberculosis in samples from the grated carrots and in those taken from the carrot storage. Genotype of bacterial isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. For case identification, we retrospectively looked over the laboratory files of the central hospital focusing on the time period of the outbreak. Results: Altogether 49 case patients were identified. Y pseudotuberculosis was detected by real-time PCR analysis in samples taken from grated carrots and from the carrot distributor. Bacterial isolates originating from the farm environment showed identical serotype (O:1) and genotype (S12) with the patients' isolates. Among 37 adults, reactive arthritis (ReA) was found in 8 (22%) and three adults had probable ReA. Six (67%) out of nine human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typed patients with ReA were HLA-B27 positive. Erythema nodosum was found in 42% of the 12 children, whereas none of them had definite ReA. Conclusions: In this outbreak, Y pseudotuberculosis was for the first time detected in both patient and food samples. ReA was more common than earlier reported in the outbreaks associated with this pathogen; the reason may be that the previous outbreaks have occurred among children. HLA-B27 frequency was higher than usually reported in single-source outbreaks of ReA. © 2013 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism. Source


Pitkanen A.,University of Eastern Finland | Pitkanen A.,Kuopio University Hospital | Kemppainen S.,Kainuu Central Hospital | Kemppainen S.,Northern Finland Laboratory Center NordLab | And 7 more authors.
Epilepsy and Behavior | Year: 2014

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause a myriad of sequelae depending on its type, severity, and location of injured structures. These can include mood disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders, personality disorders, aggressive disorders, cognitive changes, chronic pain, sleep problems, motor or sensory impairments, endocrine dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, increased risk of infections, pulmonary disturbances, parkinsonism, posttraumatic epilepsy, or their combinations. The progression of individual pathologies leading to a given phenotype is variable, and some progress for months. Consequently, the different post-TBI phenotypes appear within different time windows. In parallel with morbidogenesis, spontaneous recovery occurs both in experimental models and in human TBI. A great challenge remains; how can we dissect the specific mechanisms that lead to the different endophenotypes, such as posttraumatic epileptogenesis, in order to identify treatment approaches that would not compromise recovery?This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "NEWroscience 2013". © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Vasala M.,Kainuu Central Hospital | Vasala M.,Finnish Food Safety Authority | Vasala M.,Northern Finland Laboratory Center NordLab | Vasala M.,Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare | Vasala M.,University of Tampere
Annals of the rheumatic diseases | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVE: We describe the epidemiological and microbiological process in the clearing of a foodborne outbreak of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis O:1 linked to raw carrots and frequency of the associated reactive extra-gastrointestinal manifestations.METHODS: The patient samples were investigated by routine culture or antibody testing methods. The real-time bacterial PCR was used to detect Y pseudotuberculosis in samples from the grated carrots and in those taken from the carrot storage. Genotype of bacterial isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. For case identification, we retrospectively looked over the laboratory files of the central hospital focusing on the time period of the outbreak.RESULTS: Altogether 49 case patients were identified. Y pseudotuberculosis was detected by real-time PCR analysis in samples taken from grated carrots and from the carrot distributor. Bacterial isolates originating from the farm environment showed identical serotype (O:1) and genotype (S12) with the patients' isolates. Among 37 adults, reactive arthritis (ReA) was found in 8 (22%) and three adults had probable ReA. Six (67%) out of nine human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typed patients with ReA were HLA-B27 positive. Erythema nodosum was found in 42% of the 12 children, whereas none of them had definite ReA.CONCLUSIONS: In this outbreak, Y pseudotuberculosis was for the first time detected in both patient and food samples. ReA was more common than earlier reported in the outbreaks associated with this pathogen; the reason may be that the previous outbreaks have occurred among children. HLA-B27 frequency was higher than usually reported in single-source outbreaks of ReA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions. Source


Mantere T.,University of Oulu | Mantere T.,Northern Finland Laboratory Center NordLab | Haanpaa M.,University of Oulu | Haanpaa M.,Northern Finland Laboratory Center NordLab | And 21 more authors.
Clinical Genetics | Year: 2015

Mutations in downstream Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes, BRCA2, PALB2, BRIP1 and RAD51C, explain part of the hereditary breast cancer susceptibility, but the contribution of other FA genes has remained questionable. Due to FA's rarity, the finding of recurrent deleterious FA mutations among breast cancer families is challenging. The use of founder populations, such as the Finns, could provide some advantage in this. Here, we have resolved complementation groups and causative mutations of five FA patients, representing the first mutation confirmed FA cases in Finland. These patients belonged to complementation groups FA-A (n=3), FA-G (n=1) and FA-I (n=1). The prevalence of the six FA causing mutations was then studied in breast (n=1840) and prostate (n=565) cancer cohorts, and in matched controls (n=1176 females, n=469 males). All mutations were recurrent, but no significant association with cancer susceptibility was observed for any: the prevalence of FANCI c.2957_2969del and c.3041G>A mutations was even highest in healthy males (1.7%). This strengthens the exclusive role of downstream genes in cancer predisposition. From a clinical point of view, current results provide fundamental information of the mutations to be tested first in all suspected FA cases in Finland. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd 88 1 July 2015 10.1111/cge.12447 SHORT REPORT SHORT REPORTS © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Mendola P.,National Health Research Institute | Wallace M.,National Health Research Institute | Hwang B.S.,National Health Research Institute | Liu D.,National Health Research Institute | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Year: 2016

Background: Ambient air pollutants may increase preterm birth (PTB) risk, but critical exposure windows are uncertain. The interaction of asthma and pollutant exposure is rarely studied. Objective: We sought to assess the interaction of maternal asthma and air pollutant exposures in relation to PTB risk. Methods: Electronic medical records for 223,502 US deliveries were linked with modified Community Multiscale Air Quality model outputs. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations estimated the odds ratio and 95% CIs for PTB on the basis of the interaction of maternal asthma and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 microns and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns, ozone (O3), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) per interquartile range. For each gestational week 23 to 36, exposures among women who delivered were compared with those remaining pregnant. Three-month preconception, whole pregnancy, weeks 1 to 28, and the last 6 weeks of gestation averages were also evaluated. Results: On assessing PTB by gestational week, we found that significant asthma interactions were sporadic before 30 weeks but more common during weeks 34 to 36, with higher risk among mothers with asthma for NOx, CO, and SO2 exposure and an inverse association with O3 in week 34. Odds of PTB were significantly higher among women with asthma for CO and NOx exposure preconception and early in pregnancy. In the last 6 weeks of pregnancy, PTB risk associated with particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns was higher among women with asthma. Conclusions: Mothers with asthma may experience a higher risk for PTB after exposure to traffic-related pollutants such as CO and NOx, particularly for exposures 3-months preconception and in the early weeks of pregnancy. © 2016. Source

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