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Claude J.,Montpellier University | Naksri W.,Mahasarakham University | Boonchai N.,Northeastern Research Institute of Petrified Wood and Mineral Resources | Boonchai N.,Jilin University | And 7 more authors.
Annales de Paleontologie | Year: 2011

In the last ten years, several fossil localities in Nakhon Ratchasima Province (northeastern Thailand) have yielded late Neogene turtle and crocodile taxa. Although not always well dated, the age of all these fossils is constrained between Middle Miocene and Pleistocene. Several crocodile taxa have been discovered: Crocodylidae, Alligatoridae and Gavialidae. In particular, the presence of Gavialis is attested in northeastern Thailand during the Pleistocene. Fossil turtles belong to several families: Geoemydidae, Testudinidae, and Trionychidae. In addition to the discovery of giant continental tortoises, some large aquatic trionychid and geoemydid turtles are present. The latter are only found in larger river systems and no longer encountered in the Mun or Chi Rivers of northeastern Thailand. Most fossil forms correspond to modern species and reveal interesting changes in biogeographical distribution patterns. These changes are likely related to changes in the size of the drainage and direction of the Mun River system. We suggest that the Mun River was probably not flowing from west to east to the Mekong River system as today but that it was flowing from east to west to the Chao Phraya River system. © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. Source


Manchester S.R.,Northeastern Research Institute of Petrified Wood and Mineral Resources | Boonchai N.,Northeastern Research Institute of Petrified Wood and Mineral Resources | Boonchai N.,University of Florida | Wheeler E.A.,Northeastern Research Institute of Petrified Wood and Mineral Resources | Wheeler E.A.,North Carolina State University
IAWA Journal | Year: 2015

A silicified wood, Welkoetoxylon multiseriatum, gen. et sp. nov., is described from the late Early Eocene Green River Formation of southwestern Wyoming. The combination of features observed in W. multiseriatum, including latex tubes (laticifers) in the rays and abundant sheath cells, indicates affinities with the Moraceae. This is the first report of fossil moraceous wood from the Eocene of the western interior of the U.S.A. and it provides reliable evidence for the Paleogene occurrence of Moraceae in this region. The indistinct growth rings of this fossil indicate this tree did not experience a distinct dormant season. © 2015 International Association of Wood Anatomists. Source

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