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Springfield, MA, United States

Northeast Utilities is a publicly traded, Fortune 500 energy company headquartered in Hartford, Connecticut and Boston, Massachusetts, with several regulated subsidiaries offering retail electricity and natural gas service to more than 3.6 million customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire.Following its 2012 merger with Boston-based NSTAR, NU has more than 4,270 circuit miles of electric transmission lines, 72,000 pole miles of distribution lines, and 6,459 miles of natural gas pipeline in New England.On February 2, 2015, Northeast Utilities and all its subsidiaries began to brand themselves as "Eversource Energy". The stock symbol will change on Feburary 19 from "NU" to "ES". Wikipedia.


Goldberg E.,Northeast Utilities
Journal of business continuity & emergency planning | Year: 2013

Organisations have traditionally dealt with data breaches by investing in protective measures without a great deal of attention to mitigation of breach consequences and response. Conversely, business continuity (BC) planning has traditionally focused on mitigating disasters, not on preventing them. From a BC planning perspective, organisations need to assume that a data breach is inevitable and plan accordingly. The spate of data breaches in these past few years hit many organisations that were well protected. Those that suffered disastrous consequences as a result of a data breach lacked effective mitigation and response, not protection. The complexity and speed of an effective data breach response require that detailed planning takes place in advance of a breach. Source


Ananthachar V.,Northeast Utilities
World Energy Engineering Congress 2010, WEEC 2010 | Year: 2010

While DSM has always been a conceptual part of IRP, in practice they have not always been an important focus. The current uncertainties facing supply resources, and in some cases (such as Connecticut) regulatory pressure, are causing a resurgence of interest in demand side alternatives. The key questions regarding DSM resources include: what will they actually cost? how quickly can they be deployed? and what will be the ultimate customer penetration rates and program effectiveness? IRP lays the groundwork for greatly increased levels of spending for energy efficiency (EE), load management, and load response in CT. Three scenarios were studied; 1) Reference level DSM (business as usual), 2) Targeted DSM (intermediate scenario), and 3) All-Cost effective DSM case. By 2020, the DSM savings in the "all cost effective case" presented in the plan would reduce peak load growth by 1,095 MW and electric savings of 5,910 GWh, due to aggressive implementation of both EE and load-response programs. The development of the DSM portion of the plan presented the electric utilities with several key challenges. As more states consider similar legislation, there are many important lessons that other states can learn through Connecticut's experience. Source


Bowes K.B.,Northeast Utilities | Beehler M.E.,Burns and McDonnell
2015 IEEE Power and Energy Society Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Conference, ISGT 2015 | Year: 2015

Early in the 20th century, George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison debated and competed on the merits and benefits of AC versus DC. Later, Samuel Insull and Franklin D. Roosevelt sparred over regulatory structure. Today, technology and emerging regulatory policy are allowing the possibility of an 'integrated grid' and 'transactive energy.' The integrated grid uses our legacy electric generation, transmission and distribution systems as a platform for the integration of new distributed energy resource technologies such as demand response, energy storage and distributed generation (DG). The legacy system allows planners and engineers to develop and apply these new technologies that are physically and financially connected to the legacy electric grid at a scale and level of performance otherwise impossible. A safe, reliable and affordable grid is foundational to a robust economy. But, does everyone believe that? Can we establish a value for the very system that will make the integrated grid and transactive energy possible? Can we leverage the integration of distributed energy resources and demand response to improve the utilization of grid assets? © 2015 IEEE. Source


Bugbee J.,University of Connecticut | Swift J.,Northeast Utilities
Energy Engineering: Journal of the Association of Energy Engineering | Year: 2013

In the 1970s a new HVAC system was designed and developed in Japan-the ductless heat pump (DHP). Today, almost all residential HVAC systems in Asia and the majority of systems in Europe are ductless, while in the U.S. DHPs account for only 1% of the residential HVAC market. Recently, inverter driven DHPs have been recognized as an effective way to reduce heating consumption in homes with electric resistance heat, and DHP initiatives have started in the Pacific Northwest and Connecticut.Inverter technology allows DHPs to operate at continuous variable partial load conditions in order to maximize their efficiency. Despite their longevity in the worldwide market, there is a lack of real-world performance data for DHPs, especially relative to their ability to work effectively and efficiently at cold ambient temperatures.While the programs in Connecticut and the Pacific Northwest have shown promising energy savings, there have been few studies published to date that involve direct measure of the operating efficiency of DHPs across a wide range of operating conditions and ambient temperatures. This article presents the results of two winters of detailed data collection on a DHP installed in central Connecticut. The DHP was installed in a 550-sq ft apartment heated with electric resistance baseboard. Throughout the two winters, the apartment alternated between electric resistance baseboard, the DHP, and a combination of both for heating under ambient conditions ranging from-10 F to 75 F. The results help to dispel the common myth that heat pumps are ineffective in cold climates. Additionally, the results of this study suggest that DHPs may be good substitutes for ground source heat pumps, as they operate at similar efficiencies for much lower installed costs. This report evaluates DHPs on both a performance and economic level to show that they have the capability to play a much larger role in the U.S. HVAC market. Source


News Article | April 29, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

HARTFORD, Conn. & BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Eversource Energy (NYSE: ES) today reported first quarter 2015 earnings of $253.3 million, or $0.80 per share, compared with first quarter 2014 earnings of $236 million, or $0.74 per share. Excluding integration costs of $4 million in 2015 and $5.8 million in 2014, Eversource earned $257.3 million, or $0.81 per share1, in the first quarter of 2015, compared with $241.8 million, or $0.76 per share1, in the first quarter of 2014. “We are pleased with both our operational and financial performance in the first quarter of 2015,” said Thomas J. May, Eversource chairman, president and chief executive officer. “Our electric and natural gas delivery systems performed extremely well throughout the bitter weather New England experienced this past winter. Additionally, our financial results are consistent with our previously announced recurring 2015 earnings guidance of between $2.75 and $2.90 per share.” Also today, the legal name change of Northeast Utilities to Eversource Energy was approved at the company’s 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareholders and the Eversource Energy Board of Trustees declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.4175 per share, payable June 30, 2015 to shareholders of record as of May 29, 2015. Eversource Energy’s electric distribution and generation segment earned $130.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $112.2 million in the first quarter of 2014. Improved results primarily reflect higher distribution revenues in the first quarter of 2015, compared with the same period of 2014, and the impact of regulatory orders on NSTAR Electric Company that were fully anticipated by the company. One order approved a settlement involving refunds to customers related to reliability and energy efficiency cost recovery mechanisms. The other order was related to the recovery of bad debt expense associated with NSTAR Electric’s basic service energy supply to customers. The favorable impacts of the regulatory orders were partially offset by higher operation, depreciation, amortization and property tax expense. Eversource Energy’s transmission segment earned $66.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $74.9 million in the first quarter of 2014. Lower transmission earnings were directly related to the impact of an order issued in March 2015 by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that affects the returns on equity earned by all electric transmission owners in New England. That decision resulted in a $12.4 million after-tax charge, primarily at The Connecticut Light and Power Company and Western Massachusetts Electric Company, and was partially offset by an increase in Eversource’s continued investment in its electric transmission system. The first-quarter earnings of Eversource Energy’s electric utility subsidiaries are noted below in millions, net of preferred dividends: Eversource Energy’s natural gas distribution segment earned $55.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $52.1 million in the first quarter of 2014. Improved results primarily reflect colder weather in 2015, which increased firm natural gas sales. Eversource’s firm natural gas sales were 8.4 percent higher in the first quarter of 2015 than the first quarter of 2014. Both quarters were much colder than average. Parent and other companies earned $4.5 million in the first quarter of 2015, excluding $4 million of integration expenses, compared with earnings of $2.6 million in the first quarter of 2014, excluding $5.8 million of integration expenses. The results primarily reflect lower operation and income tax expense. The following table reconciles consolidated earnings per share for the first quarters of 2015 and 2014. Financial results for the first quarters of 2015 and 2014 for Eversource Energy’s business segments and parent and other companies are noted below: Eversource Energy has approximately 317 million common shares outstanding. It operates New England’s largest energy delivery system, serving approximately 3.6 million customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Note: Eversource Energy will webcast a conference call with senior management on April 30, 2015, beginning at 9 a.m. Eastern Time. The webcast can be accessed through Eversource’s website at www.eversource.com. 1 All per share amounts in this news release are reported on a diluted basis. The only common equity securities that are publicly traded are common shares of Eversource Energy. The earnings and EPS of each business do not represent a direct legal interest in the assets and liabilities allocated to such business, but rather represent a direct interest in Eversource Energy's assets and liabilities as a whole. EPS by business is a non-GAAP (not determined using generally accepted accounting principles) measure that is calculated by dividing the net income or loss attributable to controlling interests of each business by the weighted average diluted Eversource parent common shares outstanding for the period. In addition, first quarter 2015 and 2014 earnings and EPS excluding certain integration costs related to the April 10, 2012 closing of the merger between Northeast Utilities and NSTAR are non-GAAP financial measures. Management uses these non-GAAP financial measures to evaluate earnings results and to provide details of earnings results by business and to more fully compare and explain our first quarter 2015 and 2014 results without including the impact of the non-recurring integration costs. Management believes that this measurement is useful to investors to evaluate the actual and projected financial performance and contribution of Eversource Energy’s businesses. Non-GAAP financial measures should not be considered as alternatives to Eversource consolidated net income attributable to controlling interests or EPS determined in accordance with GAAP as indicators of Eversource Energy’s operating performance. This news release includes statements concerning Eversource Energy’s expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, strategies, assumptions of future events, future financial performance or growth and other statements that are not historical facts. These statements are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, readers can identify these forward-looking statements through the use of words or phrases such as “estimate, “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “believe,” “forecast,” “should,” “could,” and other similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those included in the forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those included in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, cyber breaches, acts of war or terrorism, or grid disturbances; actions or inaction of local, state and federal regulatory and taxing bodies; changes in business and economic conditions, including their impact on interest rates, bad debt expense and demand for Eversource’s products and services; fluctuations in weather patterns; changes in laws, regulations or regulatory policy; changes in levels or timing of capital expenditures; disruptions in the capital markets or other events that make Eversource’s access to necessary capital more difficult or costly; developments in legal or public policy doctrines; technological developments; changes in accounting standards and financial reporting regulations; actions of rating agencies; and other presently unknown or unforeseen factors. Other risk factors are detailed from time to time in the company’s reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and Eversource Energy undertakes no obligation to update the information contained in any forward-looking statements to reflect developments or circumstances occurring after the statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities.

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