Springfield, MA, United States

Northeast Utilities

www.nu.com/
Springfield, MA, United States

Northeast Utilities is a publicly traded, Fortune 500 energy company headquartered in Hartford, Connecticut and Boston, Massachusetts, with several regulated subsidiaries offering retail electricity and natural gas service to more than 3.6 million customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire.Following its 2012 merger with Boston-based NSTAR, NU has more than 4,270 circuit miles of electric transmission lines, 72,000 pole miles of distribution lines, and 6,459 miles of natural gas pipeline in New England.On February 2, 2015, Northeast Utilities and all its subsidiaries began to brand themselves as "Eversource Energy". The stock symbol will change on Feburary 19 from "NU" to "ES". Wikipedia.

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News Article | December 14, 2015
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

Advanced energy makes news, and 2015 was proof of that. From American offshore wind finally breaking water to energy storage gigafactories to fundamental changes in the way utilities make money, businesses big and small had impact on the way the world generates and uses energy. In fact, it’s not easy to pick the top stories of the year. That said, here is the first five of our top 10 for 2015. Be sure to tune in next week for the other five. Then get ready for 2016, which we are sure will be another news-filled year for advanced energy! 1. Steel in the Water for American Offshore Wind Offshore wind has had a long row to hoe in the U.S., and 2015 started on a sour note. In January, Cape Wind, the Massachusetts project with a decade’s worth of challenges and opportunities (not to mention lawsuits) suffered a major blow when utilities National Grid and Northeast Utilities pulled out of their contracts to buy the wind farm’s energy. The utilities pulled the plug because Cape Wind failed to close financing for construction by the end of 2014, although Jim Gordon claimed it was the “unprecedented, and unrelenting” legal challenges from opponents that made it impossible to do so. In March, however, a new breeze brought new hope for American offshore wind. Rhode Island’s Deepwater Wind raised the finances necessary to begin construction, with CEO Jeff Grybowski promising “steel in the water this summer.” And in July we saw that wasn’t just a lot of hot air as construction began off the coast of Rhode Island. Plans are in the works for additional installation off the coast of New Jersey (although that one has run into legal problems of its own), as well as Hawaii, Virginia, and another proposed Massachusetts project from Dong Energy, the world’s leading developer of offshore wind. Energy storage is one of the fastest-growing segments of the advanced energy economy, and for good reason. The industry got a jump-start in 2013 when California’s Public Utility Commission adopted the nation’s first energy storage mandate, and has been growing, both in capacity and worth, ever since. In April, the New York Times posted a science feature on the growing partnership between renewable energy and batteries, declaring that between installation of rooftop solar systems whose owners could benefit from on-site storage and mass production of lithium-ion cells, batteries are “set to play a significant part in the nation’s power supply.” Just how significant? It depends who you ask. Utilities are installing energy storage at a rate never before seen: Pacific Gas & Electric closed on 74 MW of storage projects, and Duke Energy installed a 4 MW project in a retired coal power plant in Ohio. What’s more, in May Elon Musk made energy storage cool with the release of his home-sized battery Powerwall, which sold out through next summer as soon as they launched. This, of course, led some commentators to smirk that the energy storage revolution wasn’t actually all it was cracked up to be, saying that although pairing home batteries with rooftop solar “makes deeply intuitive sense, it doesn’t yet make financial sense.” But, as Musk pointed out, “That doesn’t mean people won’t buy it.” (Leave it to Musk to pair blind optimism with blunt reality.) Solar-plus-storage as a reliable and long-term energy solution is coming, though, and it might just change the game. The grid of the future is one of “nodes and connections,” with both upload and download capacity The price of renewable energy is falling, and that’s good news for utilities looking for new long-term generation capacity with no need for fuel. The cost of advanced energy is steadily falling, while the cost of non-advanced energy resources remains volatile. It’s a trend we’ve tracked for a couple years: in October 2013, Xcel Energy submitted plans to the Colorado Public Utility Commission to buy electricity generated by wind – simply because it was the cheapest option available. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab recently reported that the price of wind power in PPAs signed in 2014 averaged just 2.35 cents per kWh. That trend continued in October with Xcel Energy again choosing wind, and CEO Ben Fowke saying the company plans to add about 800 MW of wind capacity over the next five years. “Wind is becoming pretty close to parity,” he said. It’s not just utility-scale installations, either: Residential solar has reached “socket parity” with power from the grid in many states. So, is the end really nigh for fossil fuels, as suggested by Bloomberg? Nah, it’s just that the future is advanced energy. As more and more advanced energy is integrated into the grid, and the concept of a grid based on nodes and connections reaches further, utilities are reforming, either because they choose to get ahead of the curve, or because of policies requiring them to do so. Earlier this year, we tried to explain exactly how utilities make money, but even then, that was changing around us. As Utility Dive reported in its State of the Electric Utility 2015, “While utility executives know they need to change the old models, they’re just not sure about the best way to do it.” The Solar Electric Power Association tried to help out by asking utilities and other stakeholders to build an electrical grid for an imaginary 51st state from scratch, which led to some interesting results. In many states, there is no need to imagine. In New York, the Public Service Commission’s Reforming the Energy Vision proceeding is moving to turn utilities into distributed system platform managers. Elsewhere, policies such as software-as-a-service, time varying rates, and demand response have been changing how utilities do business. There have also been several attempts – some successful – at utility mergers, which challenge people on both sides of the socket to think about how utilities benefit from economies of scale and what it means for consumers. Electric vehicles started the year off with a bang (or the absence of one, given the non-internal combustion engine) by stealing the show at the Consumer Electronics Show and the Detroit Auto Show as major car companies pulled out all the stops demonstrating their new EV models. Tesla continued to wrestle with state legislatures over direct vehicle sales, winning the right to sell their cars in New Jersey and Georgia… but not West Virginia. It doesn’t seem to be slowing the company down any. Consumer Reports ranked the Tesla all-wheel drive Model S P85D at 103 out of a possible 100 points, because the power and efficiency of the model was “so off-the-chart” that it broke the chart itself. “Once you start getting so ridiculously fast, so ridiculously energy efficient, it didn’t make sense to go linear on those terms anymore,” said Jake Fisher, head of automotive testing for Consumer Reports. Tesla closed out the year with announcement of autopilot technology, not yet available to the public. Is there anything the Tesla can’t do? Well, it can’t sell directly to consumers in Texas or West Virginia, and in March it did lose a race with a Ferrari. But when a major news outlet like the New York Times reports on recharge rage rather than range anxiety, Tesla and other EV makers are finding themselves with some good problems to have.


Bugbee J.,University of Connecticut | Swift J.,Northeast Utilities
Energy Engineering: Journal of the Association of Energy Engineering | Year: 2013

In the 1970s a new HVAC system was designed and developed in Japan-the ductless heat pump (DHP). Today, almost all residential HVAC systems in Asia and the majority of systems in Europe are ductless, while in the U.S. DHPs account for only 1% of the residential HVAC market. Recently, inverter driven DHPs have been recognized as an effective way to reduce heating consumption in homes with electric resistance heat, and DHP initiatives have started in the Pacific Northwest and Connecticut.Inverter technology allows DHPs to operate at continuous variable partial load conditions in order to maximize their efficiency. Despite their longevity in the worldwide market, there is a lack of real-world performance data for DHPs, especially relative to their ability to work effectively and efficiently at cold ambient temperatures.While the programs in Connecticut and the Pacific Northwest have shown promising energy savings, there have been few studies published to date that involve direct measure of the operating efficiency of DHPs across a wide range of operating conditions and ambient temperatures. This article presents the results of two winters of detailed data collection on a DHP installed in central Connecticut. The DHP was installed in a 550-sq ft apartment heated with electric resistance baseboard. Throughout the two winters, the apartment alternated between electric resistance baseboard, the DHP, and a combination of both for heating under ambient conditions ranging from-10 F to 75 F. The results help to dispel the common myth that heat pumps are ineffective in cold climates. Additionally, the results of this study suggest that DHPs may be good substitutes for ground source heat pumps, as they operate at similar efficiencies for much lower installed costs. This report evaluates DHPs on both a performance and economic level to show that they have the capability to play a much larger role in the U.S. HVAC market.


Goldberg E.,Northeast Utilities
Journal of business continuity & emergency planning | Year: 2013

Organisations have traditionally dealt with data breaches by investing in protective measures without a great deal of attention to mitigation of breach consequences and response. Conversely, business continuity (BC) planning has traditionally focused on mitigating disasters, not on preventing them. From a BC planning perspective, organisations need to assume that a data breach is inevitable and plan accordingly. The spate of data breaches in these past few years hit many organisations that were well protected. Those that suffered disastrous consequences as a result of a data breach lacked effective mitigation and response, not protection. The complexity and speed of an effective data breach response require that detailed planning takes place in advance of a breach.


Ananthachar V.,Northeast Utilities
World Energy Engineering Congress 2010, WEEC 2010 | Year: 2010

While DSM has always been a conceptual part of IRP, in practice they have not always been an important focus. The current uncertainties facing supply resources, and in some cases (such as Connecticut) regulatory pressure, are causing a resurgence of interest in demand side alternatives. The key questions regarding DSM resources include: what will they actually cost? how quickly can they be deployed? and what will be the ultimate customer penetration rates and program effectiveness? IRP lays the groundwork for greatly increased levels of spending for energy efficiency (EE), load management, and load response in CT. Three scenarios were studied; 1) Reference level DSM (business as usual), 2) Targeted DSM (intermediate scenario), and 3) All-Cost effective DSM case. By 2020, the DSM savings in the "all cost effective case" presented in the plan would reduce peak load growth by 1,095 MW and electric savings of 5,910 GWh, due to aggressive implementation of both EE and load-response programs. The development of the DSM portion of the plan presented the electric utilities with several key challenges. As more states consider similar legislation, there are many important lessons that other states can learn through Connecticut's experience.


Liu X.,Northeast Utilities | Tessin T.W.,Northeast Utilities
IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting | Year: 2015

A new revision of NERC standard EOP-005-2 requires ISOs and TOs (transmission owners) to review and update power system restoration plans in a more timely manner following planned or unplanned network changes. Power system planning and operations face a higher level of challenge to conduct overall evaluation of power system steady state, dynamics and overvoltages during system restoration. This paper summarized industrial experience of transient network modeling specially required for restoration study, presented important factors affecting EMTP-type simulation, highlighted key modeling differences compared to power flow model and demonstrated simulation errors from commercial software which may inherently make incorrect assumptions. © 2015 IEEE.


News Article | April 29, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

HARTFORD, Conn. & BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Eversource Energy (NYSE: ES) today reported first quarter 2015 earnings of $253.3 million, or $0.80 per share, compared with first quarter 2014 earnings of $236 million, or $0.74 per share. Excluding integration costs of $4 million in 2015 and $5.8 million in 2014, Eversource earned $257.3 million, or $0.81 per share1, in the first quarter of 2015, compared with $241.8 million, or $0.76 per share1, in the first quarter of 2014. “We are pleased with both our operational and financial performance in the first quarter of 2015,” said Thomas J. May, Eversource chairman, president and chief executive officer. “Our electric and natural gas delivery systems performed extremely well throughout the bitter weather New England experienced this past winter. Additionally, our financial results are consistent with our previously announced recurring 2015 earnings guidance of between $2.75 and $2.90 per share.” Also today, the legal name change of Northeast Utilities to Eversource Energy was approved at the company’s 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareholders and the Eversource Energy Board of Trustees declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.4175 per share, payable June 30, 2015 to shareholders of record as of May 29, 2015. Eversource Energy’s electric distribution and generation segment earned $130.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $112.2 million in the first quarter of 2014. Improved results primarily reflect higher distribution revenues in the first quarter of 2015, compared with the same period of 2014, and the impact of regulatory orders on NSTAR Electric Company that were fully anticipated by the company. One order approved a settlement involving refunds to customers related to reliability and energy efficiency cost recovery mechanisms. The other order was related to the recovery of bad debt expense associated with NSTAR Electric’s basic service energy supply to customers. The favorable impacts of the regulatory orders were partially offset by higher operation, depreciation, amortization and property tax expense. Eversource Energy’s transmission segment earned $66.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $74.9 million in the first quarter of 2014. Lower transmission earnings were directly related to the impact of an order issued in March 2015 by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that affects the returns on equity earned by all electric transmission owners in New England. That decision resulted in a $12.4 million after-tax charge, primarily at The Connecticut Light and Power Company and Western Massachusetts Electric Company, and was partially offset by an increase in Eversource’s continued investment in its electric transmission system. The first-quarter earnings of Eversource Energy’s electric utility subsidiaries are noted below in millions, net of preferred dividends: Eversource Energy’s natural gas distribution segment earned $55.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $52.1 million in the first quarter of 2014. Improved results primarily reflect colder weather in 2015, which increased firm natural gas sales. Eversource’s firm natural gas sales were 8.4 percent higher in the first quarter of 2015 than the first quarter of 2014. Both quarters were much colder than average. Parent and other companies earned $4.5 million in the first quarter of 2015, excluding $4 million of integration expenses, compared with earnings of $2.6 million in the first quarter of 2014, excluding $5.8 million of integration expenses. The results primarily reflect lower operation and income tax expense. The following table reconciles consolidated earnings per share for the first quarters of 2015 and 2014. Financial results for the first quarters of 2015 and 2014 for Eversource Energy’s business segments and parent and other companies are noted below: Eversource Energy has approximately 317 million common shares outstanding. It operates New England’s largest energy delivery system, serving approximately 3.6 million customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Note: Eversource Energy will webcast a conference call with senior management on April 30, 2015, beginning at 9 a.m. Eastern Time. The webcast can be accessed through Eversource’s website at www.eversource.com. 1 All per share amounts in this news release are reported on a diluted basis. The only common equity securities that are publicly traded are common shares of Eversource Energy. The earnings and EPS of each business do not represent a direct legal interest in the assets and liabilities allocated to such business, but rather represent a direct interest in Eversource Energy's assets and liabilities as a whole. EPS by business is a non-GAAP (not determined using generally accepted accounting principles) measure that is calculated by dividing the net income or loss attributable to controlling interests of each business by the weighted average diluted Eversource parent common shares outstanding for the period. In addition, first quarter 2015 and 2014 earnings and EPS excluding certain integration costs related to the April 10, 2012 closing of the merger between Northeast Utilities and NSTAR are non-GAAP financial measures. Management uses these non-GAAP financial measures to evaluate earnings results and to provide details of earnings results by business and to more fully compare and explain our first quarter 2015 and 2014 results without including the impact of the non-recurring integration costs. Management believes that this measurement is useful to investors to evaluate the actual and projected financial performance and contribution of Eversource Energy’s businesses. Non-GAAP financial measures should not be considered as alternatives to Eversource consolidated net income attributable to controlling interests or EPS determined in accordance with GAAP as indicators of Eversource Energy’s operating performance. This news release includes statements concerning Eversource Energy’s expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, strategies, assumptions of future events, future financial performance or growth and other statements that are not historical facts. These statements are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, readers can identify these forward-looking statements through the use of words or phrases such as “estimate, “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “believe,” “forecast,” “should,” “could,” and other similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those included in the forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those included in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, cyber breaches, acts of war or terrorism, or grid disturbances; actions or inaction of local, state and federal regulatory and taxing bodies; changes in business and economic conditions, including their impact on interest rates, bad debt expense and demand for Eversource’s products and services; fluctuations in weather patterns; changes in laws, regulations or regulatory policy; changes in levels or timing of capital expenditures; disruptions in the capital markets or other events that make Eversource’s access to necessary capital more difficult or costly; developments in legal or public policy doctrines; technological developments; changes in accounting standards and financial reporting regulations; actions of rating agencies; and other presently unknown or unforeseen factors. Other risk factors are detailed from time to time in the company’s reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and Eversource Energy undertakes no obligation to update the information contained in any forward-looking statements to reflect developments or circumstances occurring after the statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities.


News Article | April 29, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

HARTFORD, Conn. & BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Eversource Energy (NYSE: ES) today reported first quarter 2015 earnings of $253.3 million, or $0.80 per share, compared with first quarter 2014 earnings of $236 million, or $0.74 per share. Excluding integration costs of $4 million in 2015 and $5.8 million in 2014, Eversource earned $257.3 million, or $0.81 per share1, in the first quarter of 2015, compared with $241.8 million, or $0.76 per share1, in the first quarter of 2014. “We are pleased with both our operational and financial performance in the first quarter of 2015,” said Thomas J. May, Eversource chairman, president and chief executive officer. “Our electric and natural gas delivery systems performed extremely well throughout the bitter weather New England experienced this past winter. Additionally, our financial results are consistent with our previously announced recurring 2015 earnings guidance of between $2.75 and $2.90 per share.” Also today, the legal name change of Northeast Utilities to Eversource Energy was approved at the company’s 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareholders and the Eversource Energy Board of Trustees declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.4175 per share, payable June 30, 2015 to shareholders of record as of May 29, 2015. Eversource Energy’s electric distribution and generation segment earned $130.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $112.2 million in the first quarter of 2014. Improved results primarily reflect higher distribution revenues in the first quarter of 2015, compared with the same period of 2014, and the impact of regulatory orders on NSTAR Electric Company that were fully anticipated by the company. One order approved a settlement involving refunds to customers related to reliability and energy efficiency cost recovery mechanisms. The other order was related to the recovery of bad debt expense associated with NSTAR Electric’s basic service energy supply to customers. The favorable impacts of the regulatory orders were partially offset by higher operation, depreciation, amortization and property tax expense. Eversource Energy’s transmission segment earned $66.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $74.9 million in the first quarter of 2014. Lower transmission earnings were directly related to the impact of an order issued in March 2015 by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that affects the returns on equity earned by all electric transmission owners in New England. That decision resulted in a $12.4 million after-tax charge, primarily at The Connecticut Light and Power Company and Western Massachusetts Electric Company, and was partially offset by an increase in Eversource’s continued investment in its electric transmission system. The first-quarter earnings of Eversource Energy’s electric utility subsidiaries are noted below in millions, net of preferred dividends: Eversource Energy’s natural gas distribution segment earned $55.6 million in the first quarter of 2015, compared with earnings of $52.1 million in the first quarter of 2014. Improved results primarily reflect colder weather in 2015, which increased firm natural gas sales. Eversource’s firm natural gas sales were 8.4 percent higher in the first quarter of 2015 than the first quarter of 2014. Both quarters were much colder than average. Parent and other companies earned $4.5 million in the first quarter of 2015, excluding $4 million of integration expenses, compared with earnings of $2.6 million in the first quarter of 2014, excluding $5.8 million of integration expenses. The results primarily reflect lower operation and income tax expense. The following table reconciles consolidated earnings per share for the first quarters of 2015 and 2014. Financial results for the first quarters of 2015 and 2014 for Eversource Energy’s business segments and parent and other companies are noted below: Eversource Energy has approximately 317 million common shares outstanding. It operates New England’s largest energy delivery system, serving approximately 3.6 million customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Note: Eversource Energy will webcast a conference call with senior management on April 30, 2015, beginning at 9 a.m. Eastern Time. The webcast can be accessed through Eversource’s website at www.eversource.com. 1 All per share amounts in this news release are reported on a diluted basis. The only common equity securities that are publicly traded are common shares of Eversource Energy. The earnings and EPS of each business do not represent a direct legal interest in the assets and liabilities allocated to such business, but rather represent a direct interest in Eversource Energy's assets and liabilities as a whole. EPS by business is a non-GAAP (not determined using generally accepted accounting principles) measure that is calculated by dividing the net income or loss attributable to controlling interests of each business by the weighted average diluted Eversource parent common shares outstanding for the period. In addition, first quarter 2015 and 2014 earnings and EPS excluding certain integration costs related to the April 10, 2012 closing of the merger between Northeast Utilities and NSTAR are non-GAAP financial measures. Management uses these non-GAAP financial measures to evaluate earnings results and to provide details of earnings results by business and to more fully compare and explain our first quarter 2015 and 2014 results without including the impact of the non-recurring integration costs. Management believes that this measurement is useful to investors to evaluate the actual and projected financial performance and contribution of Eversource Energy’s businesses. Non-GAAP financial measures should not be considered as alternatives to Eversource consolidated net income attributable to controlling interests or EPS determined in accordance with GAAP as indicators of Eversource Energy’s operating performance. This news release includes statements concerning Eversource Energy’s expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, strategies, assumptions of future events, future financial performance or growth and other statements that are not historical facts. These statements are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, readers can identify these forward-looking statements through the use of words or phrases such as “estimate, “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “believe,” “forecast,” “should,” “could,” and other similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those included in the forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those included in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, cyber breaches, acts of war or terrorism, or grid disturbances; actions or inaction of local, state and federal regulatory and taxing bodies; changes in business and economic conditions, including their impact on interest rates, bad debt expense and demand for Eversource’s products and services; fluctuations in weather patterns; changes in laws, regulations or regulatory policy; changes in levels or timing of capital expenditures; disruptions in the capital markets or other events that make Eversource’s access to necessary capital more difficult or costly; developments in legal or public policy doctrines; technological developments; changes in accounting standards and financial reporting regulations; actions of rating agencies; and other presently unknown or unforeseen factors. Other risk factors are detailed from time to time in the company’s reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and Eversource Energy undertakes no obligation to update the information contained in any forward-looking statements to reflect developments or circumstances occurring after the statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities. The data contained in this report is preliminary and is unaudited. This report is being submitted for the sole purpose of providing information to present shareholders about Eversource Energy and Subsidiaries and is not a representation, prospectus, or intended for use in connection with any purchase or sale of securities.


News Article | September 24, 2010
Site: gigaom.com

A dozen or so companies have launched slick-looking electric vehicle car chargers over the past year, angling to sell hardware to the new wave of electric vehicle owners. But is there all that much variation to these new devices? To Watson Collins, who runs business development for utility Northeast Utilities, not so much. The equipment pricing of the electric vehicle chargers is very high right now, and utilities are used to buying equipment and meters at commodity prices says Collins. But electric vehicle charging stations are inherently a commodity, says Collins. “I know equipment vendors don’t want to portray it as a commodity, but there’s nothing unique about anyone’s approach or equipment. Companies are just trying to position themselves as having something special.” That’s probably not a sentiment that startups like Coulomb Technologies want to hear. A commodity business — with low margins that just competes on lower and lower prices and not technology — is a place where generally bigger companies thrive. In contrast startups usually emerge into a space because they’ve developed an innovative technology and intellectual property that can disrupt commodity-based industries. It’s common for startups to emerge at the very beginning of an industry — like EV charging — that will eventually become a commodity business. In that case the startups have a couple options. First off they can race to grow big fast, and move to the front of the pack before the big players move in. They can also partner with large hardware makers, and for example, Coulomb Technologies is working with Siemens on a joint reseller deal and Better Place recently partnered with GE Better Place. Another option for startups in the EV charging space is to concentrate a lot more heavily on the software, which can add value and manage the rate and time of the charge. That’s what Juice Technologies has done and is the software brains behind GE’s new WattStation. I’ll also be interested to see if the design element alone convinces any customers to the purchase of the charging station. GE invested in having famed eco designer Yves Behar design the WattStation. At the end of the day commoditizing EV chargers is a good thing for the overall electric vehicle industry. As a commodity the prices of the chargers will drop and more customers will buy them. For more research on electric cars check out GigaOM Pro (subscription required):


News Article | November 9, 2015
Site: www.renewableenergyworld.com

On what effect the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan will have on transmission development in the country, including potentially a need for more transmission to transport added renewable energy, Frank Poirot, senior media specialist of transmission with Northeast Utilities (NYSE:NU) told TransmissionHub that increasing the grid's capacity to transmit power is one way to meet the growing need and enable renewable generation.

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