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Tinc P.J.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Ayers P.D.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | May J.J.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Purschwitz M.A.,University of Kentucky | Sorensen J.A.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture
Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health | Year: 2015

Tractor overturns continue to be the leading cause of death on U.S. farms. While rollover protective structures (ROPS) are effective in preventing these fatalities, they are underutilized due to a number of barriers. Past programs in the U.S. and abroad have targeted this area of agricultural safety; however, a national program is not yet in place for U.S. farmers. This study seeks to build a national partnership to address tractor overturn fatalities by increasing the number of tractors with ROPS. A diverse, multisector steering committee has been organized and is working together using Whole System in a Room methods. This method brings together partners from nine stakeholder groups to identify and commit to a collaborative solution to the issue. © 2015 ASABE. Source


Tinc P.J.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Ayers P.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | May J.J.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Purschwitz M.A.,University of Kentucky | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Agromedicine | Year: 2016

Fatalities due to tractor overturns have long plagued the US farm community. Constituting 20% of agricultural fatalities, tractor overturns contribute significantly to high rates of fatal injuries. In the past, many efforts have been directed toward reducing tractor overturns, with one successful US-based program offering rebates to farmers who retrofit their tractors with rollover protective structures (ROPS). In an effort to expand the program, the National Tractor Safety Coalition was formed. This coalition hosted a “Whole System in the Room” workshop to bring 50 stakeholders together. During this workshop, participants worked together to identify a common vision for the future of tractor safety and ROPS programs and commit to action. At the close of the workshop, coalition members set out to begin work on 100 short- and long-term commitments to begin implementing a National ROPS Rebate Program. © 2016 Taylor & Francis. Source


Chapel D.B.,Columbia University | Sorensen J.A.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Tinc P.J.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Fiske T.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health | Year: 2015

Despite the substantial contribution of power take-off (PTO) entanglements to workplace morbidity and mortality among agricultural workers, the degree of proper PTO shielding on U.S. farms remains poorly characterized. Sampling from the New York data of the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS), at least 200 each of dairy, livestock, crop, fruit, and vegetable farms were surveyed by phone to determine the extent of proper PTO shielding. In the same year, on-site audits were performed at 211 randomly selected New York livestock and dairy farms using a four-point scale to assess PTO shielding. Supplemental data were gathered on farm acreage, number of livestock, principal commodity, and operator experience. The phone survey data for livestock and dairy farms were then compared to the on-farm audit data. In the phone survey, 72.5% of farms reported having shields on all implements. The mean percentage of implements reported to be shielded was 90.2%. By on-farm audit, 10% of farms had all implements properly shielded, and the mean percentage of properly shielded implements was 56.7%, with shielding rates differing widely for different classes of implements. No significant predictors of PTO shielding were identified. The phone survey greatly overestimated proper PTO shielding rates when compared with the on-farm audits. These data suggest a lower level of proper shielding among farmers than is mandated by current industry safety standards. The results also identify a principal weakness of phone surveys in accurately assessing the true magnitude of on-farm risk for PTO entanglement. © 2015 ASABE. Source


Tinc P.J.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Madden E.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Park S.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Weil R.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture | Sorensen J.A.,Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety in Agriculture
Journal of Agromedicine | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT: Machinery entanglements, specifically power take-off (PTO) entanglements, are a leading cause of injuries and fatalities on farms. In order to address this life-threatening issue, a social marketing campaign is being developed to reduce barriers and emphasize motivators to shielding. This article discusses the process of designing, testing, and selecting concepts to be used in the campaign. Small-group discussions (triads) were held to test 13 message concepts. Participants were asked to provide feedback and select the two messages that they believed to be most powerful. Upon completion, three message concepts were selected to be finalized. © , Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source

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