Northamptonshire Center for Oncology

Northamptonshire, United Kingdom

Northamptonshire Center for Oncology

Northamptonshire, United Kingdom
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MacDougall N.D.,St. Bartholomew's Hospital | Graveling M.,Northamptonshire Center for Oncology | Hansen V.N.,Royal Marsden NHS Trust | Brownsword K.,Radiation Physics Queens Center for Oncology and Haematology | Morgan A.,Musgrove Park Hospital
British Journal of Radiology | Year: 2017

Objective: Towards Safer Radiotherapy recommended that radiotherapy (RT) centres should have protocols in place for in vivo dosimetry (IVD) monitoring at the beginning of patient treatment courses (Donaldson S. Towards safer radiotherapy. R Coll Radiol 2008). This report determines IVD implementation in the UK in 2014, the methods used and makes recommendations on future use. Methods: Evidence from peer-reviewed journals was used in conjunction with the first survey of UK RT centre IVD practice since the publication of Towards Safer Radiotherapy. In March 2014, profession-specific questionnaires were sent to radiographer, clinical oncologist and physics staff groups in each of the 66 UK RT centres. Results: Response rates from each group were 74%, 45% and 74%, respectively. 73% of RT centres indicated that they performed IVD. Diodes are the most popular IVD device. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) is still in use in a number of centres but not as a sole modality, being used in conjunction with diodes and/or electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The use of EPID dosimetry is increasing and is considered of most potential value for both geometric and dosimetric verification. Conclusion: Owing to technological advances, such as electronic data transfer, independent monitor unit checking and daily image-guided radiotherapy, the overall risk of adverse treatment events in RT has been substantially reduced. However, the use of IVD may prevent a serious radiation incident. Point dose IVD is not considered suited to the requirements of verifying advanced RT techniques, leaving EPID dosimetry as the current modality likely to be developed as a future standard. Advances in knowledge: An updated perspective on UK IVD use and provision of professional guidelines for future implementation. © 2017 The Authors. Published by the British Institute of Radiology.


Eldeeb H.,Northamptonshire Center for Oncology | Macmillan C.,Northamptonshire Center for Oncology | Elwell C.,Northamptonshire Center for Oncology | Hammod A.,Northamptonshire Center for Oncology
Cancer Biology and Medicine | Year: 2012

Objective: To assess the impact of close or positive surgical margins on the outcome, and to determine whether margin status influence the recurrence rate and the overall survival for patients with head and neck cancers. Methods: Records from 1996 to 2001 of 413 patients with primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with surgery as the first line treatment were analysed. Of these patients, 82 were eligible for the study. Patients were followed up for 5 years. Results: Patients with margins between 5-10 mm had 50% recurrence rate (RR), those with surgical margins between 1-5 mm had RR of 59% and those with positive surgical margins had RR of 90% (P=0.004). The 5-year survival rates were 54%, 39% and 10%, respectively (P=0.002). Conclusions: Unsatisfactory surgical margin is an independent risk factor for recurrence free survival as well as overall survival regardless of the other tumor and patient characteristics. © 2012 by Cancer Biology & Medicine.

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