North Shore University Hospital

North Bay Shore, NY, United States

North Shore University Hospital

North Bay Shore, NY, United States

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Richard B. Jacaruso, MD, Cardiologist currently working at Island Wide Medical Associates, and affiliated with Winthrop-University Hospital and North Shore University Hospital, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Garden City, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso is a highly experienced cardiologist who has been in practice for nearly three decades. His medical career began in 1987, when he graduated from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. After an internship at New York’s Peninsula Hospital Center, he completed a residency and fellowship at Winthrop-University Hospital, with whom he is still affiliated. Dr. Jacaruso is triple board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, and Nuclear Cardiology. With his wealth of experience to call upon, he diagnoses and treats a wide range of conditions related to the heart. These include congenital heart disease and defects, heart murmurs and palpitations, thrombosis, cardiomyopathy, and aortic aneurysms. Expert procedures carried out by him include echocardiography and pacemaker insertion and replacement. Dr. Jacaruso is renowned not only for his clinical excellence, but also for his use of the very latest technology, bringing excellent results to his patients and speeding up typical recovery times. His dedication and expertise makes Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso a very deserving winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


LOUISVILLE, Ky.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--There are now two reasons for patients to flinch at the touch of a stethoscope: because it’s cold, of course; and because it’s covered with germs. A new study1 from medical researchers reveals that 80 percent of the stethoscopes they studied were contaminated by high concentrations of bacteria, so much so that they present as much risk of transferring infectious bacteria as the hands of physicians after a physical exam. The study, published by American Journal of Infection Control, compared bacteria loads on today’s standard stethoscopes and scopes fabricated with antimicrobial copper alloys that continuously kill 99.9 percent of bacteria. CuVerro® is a leading producer of EPA-registered antimicrobial copper. Researchers discovered that stethoscopes made with traditional materials on the chest pieces, tubing, and diaphragms expose patients to an average of 127.1 CFUs (colony forming units of bacteria). In contrast, the stethoscopes made with antimicrobial copper exposed patients to an average of only 11.7 CFUs. The copper-alloy devices carried bacteria burdens 91 percent lower than standard scopes. This difference could be significant in an age where patients and medical professionals are increasingly concerned about the incidence of transmitting bacteria that cause healthcare-associated infections, a problem that results in 99,000 patient deaths each year in US hospitals and leads to annual direct and indirect costs totaling between $96 and $147 billion.2 The study, led by Dr. Michael G. Schmidt, Vice Chairman of Microbiology and Immunology at the Medical University of South Carolina, pointed to evidence that there is only a one-in-ten chance that health professionals routinely disinfect their stethoscopes, making the effects of incorporating copper into the design of stethoscopes even more compelling. The report noted there isn’t a “consistently applied routine of cleaning and disinfecting stethoscopes between patient encounters” even though they come in frequent contact with the "unsanitized skin of patients and the hands, face, neck and clothing of health care workers.” “Based on these trial results,” Dr. Schmidt noted, “we can say that adding antimicrobial copper stethoscopes to a healthcare facility’s bundle of infection control measures would likely help to limit the spread of infectious agents. In other studies, antimicrobial copper touch surfaces have been demonstrated to work in concert with existing hygiene procedures to help create safer environments.” The stethoscope study was conducted variously at the Medical University of South Carolina’s Children’s Hospital, the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of New Mexico, and North Shore University Hospital in New York. CuVerro is manufactured by GBC Metals, LLC, doing business as Olin Brass, a wholly owned subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper, Inc. which is a subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:BRSS), the leading manufacturer and distributor of copper, copper‐alloy and bactericidal copper sheet, strip, plate, foil, rod, ingot and fabricated components in North America and one of the largest in the world. GBC Metals engages in the melting, casting, rolling, drawing, extruding and stamping of specialized copper and copper alloys finished products from scrap, cathode and other refined metals. (OB‐0034‐1510)


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A new Consumer Reports analysis of more than 1,300 hospitals finds that 56 percent of U.S. hospitals have C-section rates above the national target for low-risk births. The report also reveals startling variations in C-section rates from hospital to hospital, even those within the same zip code. The message to mothers? Your biggest risk for an unnecessary C-section may be the hospital you choose. Roughly one in three babies born in this country, or about 1.3 million children each year, are now delivered by cesarean section, the most common surgery performed in U.S. hospitals. “Research suggests that for childbirth, women pick their doctor first, not their hospital. Our goal is to get women thinking about the hospital too, since the hospital you choose can play a big role in determining your risk of a C-section,” says Doris Peter, Ph.D., director, Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center. The C-section hospital ratings – all free – are available online at CR.org/hospitalratings. In many cases, cesarean sections are absolutely necessary. But often they are not: Almost half are done in situations where babies could be delivered vaginally instead, according to research. “Most hospitals are doing far too many unnecessary C-sections and women, armed with this data, can help Consumer Reports send a message to hospitals that we want them to improve,” said Peter. Consumer Reports’ goal is two-fold: first, to make C-section rates public to help new moms make smart choices, and second, to use the ratings as a mechanism to bring high rates down and thus drive positive marketplace change. The risk of having a C-section is higher in the Northeast and South, and lower in the West and Midwest. Four states had C-section rates of 30 percent or higher: West Virginia (31 percent), Florida (31 percent), Louisiana (32 percent), and Nebraska (34 percent, where there is only one hospital reporting data). And four states had rates below 18.5 percent: South Dakota (17 percent), Idaho (17 percent), New Mexico (17 percent), and Minnesota (18 percent). The national benchmark set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is 23.9 percent or less. The variation among individual hospitals is even more dramatic. For large hospitals, C- section rates range from 7 percent at Crouse Hospital in Syracuse, New York, to 51 percent at South Miami Hospital in Miami, Florida. And just outside of Miami, Hialeah Hospital had the highest C-section rate (65 percent) of all hospitals rated by Consumer Reports. Even when hospitals are located within close proximity, variations in C-Section rates can be substantial. Consumer Reports found this pattern in multiple locations including the following cities: St. Louis, Missouri; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Fort Worth, Texas. “This variation is a critical point in our analysis because there is a big, important take away for moms. You cannot afford not to know the track record of the hospital where you’re delivering,” says Peter. Furthermore, in a recent study in the journal Birth, more than half of women said they would travel 20 miles farther to have their baby at a hospital with a C-section rate that was 20 percentage points lower. Some hospitals aren’t making it easy for women to know their C-section rates, Peter said. Consumer Reports does not have data for more than half of the estimated 3,000 hospitals that deliver babies because hospitals aren’t required to report that information to the public. “We applaud those hospitals who do share their C-section data, particularly the ones who do poorly. We see this as a critical step in the direction toward greater transparency and openness,” says Peter. Most worrisome are the hospitals that perform more than 5,000 births every year and do not publicly report their data, of which there are 28. Consumer Reports contacted the three hospitals with the most births and to date, only one, Memorial Hermann Greater Heights Hospital, responded. New York- Presbyterian Hospital in New York City and Northside Hospital in Atlanta did not respond to requests for comment. The following states had more than two of these large non-reporting hospitals: Florida, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Texas. New York has a total of eight non-reporting hospitals, most of which are located in New York City: Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park; Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn; Mount Sinai Hospital, NYC; Mount Sinai St. Lukes – Roosevelt, NYC; New York Methodist, Brooklyn; New York- Presbyterian Hospital, NYC; North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset; NYU Langone Medical Center, NYC. Overall, there were 216 hospitals with C-section rates above 33.3 percent for low-risk deliveries, earning CR’s worst rating. Of these hospitals, the 22 listed below were the ones that delivered the most babies within a year. Conversely, there were 203 hospitals with rates of 18.4 percent or lower, earning CR’s best rating. Twenty- two of them were hospitals that delivered a high volume of babies. South Miami Hospital, Miami, Fla     51 Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY     44 Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ     43 Woman’s Hospital of Texas, Houston, TX     41 Midland Memorial Hospital, Midland, TX     40 Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA     39 Las Palmas Medical Center, El Paso, TX     39 Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, Plano, TX     39 Memorial Regional Hospital, Hollywood, FL     38 Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, Richmond, VA     37 Doctor’s Hospital at Renaissance, Edinburg, TX     37 Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL     37 Riverside Community Hospital, Riverside, CA     36 Bayshore Medical Center, Pasadena, TX     35 Jackson Health System, Miami, FL     35 Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, FL     34 St. Joseph’s Healthcare System, Paterson, NJ     34 Medical Center at Bowling Green, Bowling Green, KY     34 Baylor All Saints Medical Center at Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX     34 Wesley Medical Center, Wichita, KS     34 Inova Alexandria Hospital, Alexandria, VA     34 Baptist Medical Center, San Antonio, TX     34 About Consumer Reports Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. For 80 years, CR has provided evidence-based product testing and ratings, rigorous research, hard-hitting investigative journalism, public education, and steadfast policy action on behalf of consumers’ interests. Unconstrained by advertising or other commercial influences, CR has exposed landmark public health and safety issues and strives to be a catalyst for pro-consumer changes in the marketplace. From championing responsible auto safety standards, to winning food and water protections, to enhancing healthcare quality, to fighting back against predatory lenders in the financial markets, Consumer Reports has always been on the front lines, raising the voices of consumers. __________ MAY 2017 © 201​7​ Consumer Reports. The material above is intended for legitimate news entities only; it may not be used for advertising or promotional purposes. Consumer Reports® is an expert, independent, nonprofit organization whose mission is to work side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. We accept no advertising and pay for all the products we test. We are not beholden to any commercial interest. Our income is derived from the sale of Consumer Reports® magazine, ConsumerReports.org® and our other publications and information products, services, fees, and noncommercial contributions and grants. Our Ratings and reports are intended solely for the use of our readers. Neither the Ratings nor the reports may be used in advertising or for any other commercial purpose without our prior written permission. Consumer Reports will take all steps open to it to prevent unauthorized commercial use of its content and trademarks.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Santa Fe’s only destination spa, Sunrise Springs Spa Resort, announced today that it will now offer day visitors and locals access to their wellness practitioners, Medical Director, Sally Fisher, MD, and Lead Counselor Michael Schroeder, LMFT. Dr. Fisher focuses on integrative, holistic, preventive and nutritional medicine while Schroeder focuses on individual and couples’ counseling. Both experts offer on-site, one-on-one sessions to help guests discover optimal health. Guests meet for a personal, confidential consultation with Dr. Fisher to discuss a holistic approach to health concerns or wellness goals. In this session, Dr. Fisher’s compassionate approach to creating a sustainable plan for living well can include a range of concerns including brain health, digestive health, weight, nutrition and supplements, sleep, stress and cortisol issues, female or male health, autoimmunity and cancer. For lodging guests, Dr. Fisher teaches a variety of classes at Sunrise, covering topics such as nutrition, stress and relaxation, gut health, ancient rhythms (sleep, seasons, sunlight and darkness), and how history, evolution and botany have all played important roles in our use of food as medicine. A 70-acre oasis centered around natural cold spring-fed ponds and surrounded by towering cottonwood trees and extensive gardens, Sunrise sets the stage for guests to quickly grasp an improved sense of well-being just by spending time outdoors, walking the property, bathed in sunshine and away from their digital devices. “When guests arrive, they say they feel better almost instantly,” said Fisher. “When people realize they have the capacity to shift their experience more easily than they expected, they become inspired in our sessions to reach the health goals and objectives they seek.” At the center of Sunrise Springs is a Medicine Wheel, which represents the harmonious balance between the mental, emotional, spiritual and physical aspects of well-being. Here Michael Schroeder begins a session with questions which lead to insights about a guest’s present life. By creating this awareness, guests better understand their relationship with themselves and their connection with others. Schroeder’s confidential one-on-one sessions are solution-focused, combining art, myth, mindfulness and elements of Zen Buddhism to address topics such as stress and anxiety, esteem, intimacy, relationship wellness and parenting. “Our healing philosophies and experiential offerings are built for anyone seeking a deeper exploration and understanding of their lives,” said Schroeder. Dr. Sally Fisher and Michael Schroeder lead an experienced team of wellness professionals with offerings such as expressive arts and cooking classes, mindfulness meditation, yoga and fitness and horticulture as well as therapeutic activities with Silkie chickens and Labrador puppies in training to be service dogs. Additionally, locals and day visitors can access a menu of services available at the Sunrise Springs Spa including massage, body work, skin care, and private pools in the Ojitos outdoor soaking experience. Guests are also welcome to dine on farm-fresh cuisine seven days a week for lunch, dinner and Sunday Brunch at the Blue Heron Restaurant, helmed by Executive Chef Rocky Durham. For more information on Sunrise Springs Spa Resort, visit sunrisesprings.com. ### ABOUT SALLY FISHER, MD: Dr. Fisher began her professional career by interning at the North Shore University Hospital/New York University School of Medicine. Subsequently, she completed her residency at Mt. Sinai/New York University School of Medicine in Preventative, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. She also participated in a fellowship program in holistic Medicine at Columbia University School of Medicine. More recently, Dr. Fisher worked as an integrative medicine/preventive medicine clinic physician at the University of New Mexico Center for Life. Dr. Fisher also has a private practice in Albuquerque offering integrative, preventive and nutritional medicine. Dr. Fisher received her B.A. in Psychology from Yale University summa cum laude. She then earned her M.D. at the University of New Mexico, where she received the Faculty Award for Outstanding Senior. Dr. Fisher earned her M.S. in Community Medicine at Mt. Sinai/New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Fisher is board certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine, the American Board of Integrative and Holistic Medicine and the American Board of Physician Nutrition Specialists. Dr. Fisher is also a clinical assistant professor at the University of New Mexico. ABOUT MICHAEL SCHROEDER, LMFT: Schroeder received undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Printmaking from the University of California Santa Cruz and has strived to maintain the connection between art and psychology in his career and personal life. Michael studied graphic and furniture design at Parsons School of Design in NYC and trained as a yoga instructor at New York’s Integral Yoga. For many years, Michael worked as a fine artist specializing in printmaking, resin casting and woodwork with gallery representation in New York City and Santa Fe. Art led him back to psychology, particularly depth-related modalities and the work of Carl Jung, MD. Schroeder received his Master’s Degree from Pacifica Graduate Institute, graduating summa cum laude. He has worked extensively with couples and kids. His psychotherapy practice is solution-focused, combining art, myth, mindfulness and elements of Zen Buddhism to help individuals and couples evolve to greater self-knowledge. Schroeder is a licensed psychotherapist (LMFT) in California and New Mexico. About Sunrise Springs Spa Resort The only destination spa in enchanting Santa Fe, N.M., Sunrise Springs Spa Resort, is a tranquil natural springs sanctuary that has been a source of rejuvenation for centuries, weaving ancient wisdom and healing traditions with modern wellness. At the heart of the resort’s 70 acres is a sacred Medicine Wheel surrounded by 20 spacious casitas and 32 garden-view guest rooms; the new Ojitos, open-air soaking experience; a spa; greenhouse; yoga, fitness and expressive arts studios; puppy studio and chicken coop; and restaurant serving nourishing farm-fresh cuisine. A passionate team of credentialed wellness professionals guide guests to discover their unique path to creating harmony amongst the four aspects of wellbeing: mental, emotional, physical and spiritual. All-inclusive offerings range from the one-night Refresh + Recharge package to multi-day Girls’ Getaways, Couples’ R+R, Wellness Exploration and Immerse + Thrive experiences. Guests can also visit the nearby historic sister property, Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort & Spa just north of Santa Fe. Sunrise Springs is an Ojo Spa Resort.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Akebia Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKBA), a biopharmaceutical company focused on delivering innovative therapies to patients with kidney disease through the biology of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), today announced the appointment of Rita Jain, M.D. as Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Jain will be responsible for leading the clinical development of the Company’s HIF pipeline, including the global Phase 3 development program for vadadustat, an oral HIF stabilizer in development for the treatment of anemia related to chronic kidney disease. Dr. Jain succeeds Brad Maroni, M.D. who will remain at Akebia as a medical advisor. “Rita has more than 20 years of drug development experience, and having directed multiple registration trials as well as a large cardiovascular patient outcomes-driven trial, her expertise will be particularly relevant to her role at Akebia,” said John P. Butler, President and Chief Executive Officer of Akebia. “Her experience working with key opinion leaders and collaborators will be important as we complete clinical development of vadadustat, prepare for regulatory submissions and set the stage for commercialization. I’d like to thank Brad for his many contributions to the development of vadadustat and our pipeline, and we are pleased that he will be an advisor to Akebia.” Dr. Jain joins Akebia from AbbVie where she most recently was the Vice President of Men’s and Women’s Health and Metabolic Development. During her time at AbbVie and Abbott she oversaw the development of more than 15 new chemical entities and marketed products. She has also held leadership roles at Pharmacia Corp, as well as a faculty position at the North Shore University Hospital where she was the Director of the Program in Novel Therapeutics. Dr. Jain earned her M.D. at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Medicine and her B.S. from LIU/C.W. Post. “I am excited to join Akebia at a pivotal time in the global Phase 3 development program for vadadustat,” said Dr. Jain. “The strong foundation of clinical data from 15 trials of vadadustat gives me great confidence in our Phase 3 program, and underscores the potential of vadadustat to help patients living with anemia related to chronic kidney disease. I look forward to working with my colleagues at Akebia, investigators and the regulatory authorities to bring this innovative treatment to patients.” About Anemia Associated with CKD Anemia results from the body's inability to coordinate red blood cell production in response to lower oxygen levels due to the progressive loss of kidney function with inadequate erythropoietin production. Left untreated, anemia significantly accelerates patients' overall deterioration of health with increased morbidity and mortality. Anemia is currently treated with injectable recombinant erythropoiesis stimulating agents, which are associated with inconsistent hemoglobin responses and well-documented safety risks. The prevalence of anemia increases with the severity of CKD and is higher in people with CKD who are over age 60. Akebia Therapeutics, Inc. is a biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, focused on delivering innovative therapies to patients with kidney disease through hypoxia-inducible factor biology. Akebia's lead product candidate, vadadustat, is an oral, investigational therapy in development for the treatment of anemia related to chronic kidney disease in both non-dialysis and dialysis patients. Akebia's global Phase 3 program for vadadustat, which includes the PRO TECT studies for non-dialysis patients with anemia secondary to chronic kidney disease and the INNO VATE studies for dialysis-dependent patients, is currently ongoing. For more information, please visit our website at www.akebia.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements include those about Akebia's strategy, future plans and prospects, including statements regarding the potential commercialization of vadadustat if approved by regulatory authorities, and the potential indications and benefits of vadadustat. The words “anticipate,” “appear,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “predict,” “project,” “target,” “potential,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “continue,” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. Each forward-looking statement is subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in such statement, including the risk that existing preclinical and clinical data may not be predictive of the results of ongoing or later clinical trials; the funding required to develop Akebia's product candidates and operate the company, and the actual expenses associated therewith; the actual costs incurred in the Phase 3 studies of vadadustat and the availability of financing to cover such costs; the timing and content of decisions made by the FDA and other regulatory authorities; the actual time it takes to initiate and complete research and development; the success of competitors in developing product candidates for diseases for which Akebia is currently developing its product candidates; and Akebia's ability to obtain, maintain and enforce patent and other intellectual property protection for vadadustat and its other product candidates. Other risks and uncertainties include those identified under the heading "Risk Factors" in Akebia's Annual Report on Form 10-Q for quarter ended March 31, 2017, and other filings that Akebia may make with the Securities and Exchange Commission in the future. Akebia does not undertake, and specifically disclaims, any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this press release.


Three leaders in preventing healthcare-associated infections discuss how patients can stay safer in hospital. There’s one place you never want to “go viral”: in the hospital (or in the clinic, nursing home, rehab facility, or even the dentist’s office.) HAIs — hospital-acquired or healthcare-associated infections — claim the lives of tens of thousands of patients in the US every year, and harm countless more. (And it’s not just viruses: bacteria can be just as dangerous.) At a symposium held in Plainview, NY on May 1, an audience heard three leading infection-prevention specialists discuss the ways good patient safety protocols can reduce that toll. The event, one of an annual series hosted by Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education and Advocacy (CPSEA), brought together members of the public and healthcare professionals to hear Janet Eagan, RN (Manager, Infection Control at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center), Dr. Bruce E. Hirsch (Attending Physician, Div. of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital) and Lisa Wandowski DNP, PNP, CIC (Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise) analyze this serious and growing problem. After the Symposium participants were asked to complete evaluations of what they had learned. Some of the comments were: -       Patients and their advocates need to make sure all medical staff wash hands before approaching the bedside. (Sterile gloves are not a substitute!) -       Having a colonoscopy? Ask about the facility’s equipment sanitation routine: scopes used in colonoscopies are often not sterilized, just sanitized. -       Overuse of powerful antibiotics is a serious issue, encouraging the rise of resistant “superbugs,” compromising patients’ healthy microbiomes, and polluting the environment. -       Dangerous intestinal infections such as “C-Diff” can be successfully treated with “fecal transplants” containing healthy bacteria. In addition to its annual symposia, Pulse — the only grassroots patient safety organization on Long Island — provides a wide range of education, training, and direct work with vulnerable segments of the population. Visit www.pulsecenterforpatientsafety.org to learn more. To discuss this or other patient safety issues with Pulse President Ilene Corina, call (516) 579-4711.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

People who often drink soda, with sugar or without it, may be more likely to develop memory problems and have smaller brain volumes, according to two recent studies. In one study, researchers found that people who drank diet soda every day were three times more likely to have a stroke or develop dementia over 10 years than those who did not consume any diet soda. In the second study, the same researchers concluded that people who consumed at least one diet soda a day had smaller brain volumes than those who did not drink any diet soda. Moreover, that same study found that people who consumed more than two sugary beverages such as soda or fruit juice a day had smaller brain volumes and worse memory function that those who did not consume any such beverages. [7 Biggest Diet Myths] Although both studies show that there is a link between drinking diet or sugary beverages and certain health outcomes, the results do not mean that consuming such beverages directly causes these outcomes, said the lead author of both studies, Matthew P. Pase, a neurology researcher at Boston University School of Medicine. In the first study, published April 20 in the journal Stroke, the researchers interviewed about 4,300 people, ages 45 and older, three times over seven years, and asked them whether they drank any diet or sugary beverages. Then, toward the end of the seven-year period, the scientists began to monitor the study participants' health for cases of stroke and dementia, and continued to do so for the next 10 years. During this period, 97 people had a stroke and 81 people developed dementia — a number that included 63 cases of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers found that the daily consumption of diet beverages, but not sugary beverages, was linked to a higher risk of stroke and dementia over the 10-year period. The reasons behind these findings are not clear, but previous research had linked the consumption of diet drinks with obesity and diabetes, which might also be linked to with poor blood circulation, Pase said. Problems with circulation may contribute to a person's risk of stroke or dementia because the brain relies on a constant supply of blood to function well, he said. The findings of this study suggest that turning to diet beverages in the hope of avoiding extra calories from sugary drinks may not be a good idea, said Dr. Paul Wright, chairman of neurology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, New York, who was not involved in the study. "The right direction to go in is to have plain water," or other beverages that do not contain artificial sweeteners, he told Live Science. [7 Foods You Can Overdose On] In the second study, published in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia, the researchers looked at brain scans and results of cognitive tests conducted in about 4,000 people. The scientists also asked the study participants if they consumed any diet or sugary beverages, and, if so, how much. The data revealed a link between the consumption of both diet and sugary beverages and smaller brain volumes. Moreover, the researchers found a link between the consumption of sugary beverages and poorer memory. All of those outcomes are risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said. As with the first study, the mechanisms that might underlie the link between the consumption of sugary beverages and these outcomes are unclear, Pase told Live Science. However, previous research has linked high sugar intake with diabetes and high blood pressure — conditions linked to compromised blood circulation that may ultimately affect brain health, he said.


News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Interview Infection-Prevention Experts at Pulse CPSEA's Spring Symposium, 'Infection Prevention: It Begins with You!' Healthcare reporters are invited to speak personally with leading national experts in the prevention of healthcare-acquired infections in advance of Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education & Advocacy’s Spring Symposium, Infection Prevention: It Begins with You! in Plainview, N.Y., at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 1. It’s bad enough being in the hospital, but it can be so much worse when a patient contracts an “HAI” — a Healthcare-Acquired Infection — while there. Despite the best efforts of the medical profession, growing numbers of patients still contract infections in health care facilities. This is one of the most critical challenges facing the medical profession today. Pulse’s symposium will focus on the latest findings about HAIs, and three key speakers will discuss the issue and what we can do about it. The formal program starts at 6 p.m., but members of the press are invited to talk one-on-one with our speakers from 5 to 6 p.m. Janet Eagan RN — Manager, Infection Control at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She specializes in infection control in the oncology patient population. Bruce E. Hirsch MD, FACP, AAHIVS — Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital. He is interested in preventive health strategies and the role of healthy bacteria in the human microbiome. Lisa A. Waldowski DNP, PNP, CIC — Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise. She advises surveyors with interpretations and education about infection control findings, and responds to challenging questions, complaints, and potential threat to life/patient safety events. Please take advantage of this unique opportunity to pose your questions to these industry-leading specialists. Here are the details: When: Monday, May 1. The event starts at 5 p.m. with a light buffet, refreshments and networking time; the formal program runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Holiday Inn 215 Sunnyside Blvd, Plainview, NY 11803 Please RSVP to (516) 579-4711 or 516-830-0831 Pulse's Mission: To raise awareness about patient safety through advocacy, education and support.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Interview Infection-Prevention Experts at Pulse CPSEA's Spring Symposium, 'Infection Prevention: It Begins with You!' Healthcare reporters are invited to speak personally with leading national experts in the prevention of healthcare-acquired infections in advance of Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education & Advocacy’s Spring Symposium, Infection Prevention: It Begins with You! in Plainview, N.Y., at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 1. It’s bad enough being in the hospital, but it can be so much worse when a patient contracts an “HAI” — a Healthcare-Acquired Infection — while there. Despite the best efforts of the medical profession, growing numbers of patients still contract infections in health care facilities. This is one of the most critical challenges facing the medical profession today. Pulse’s symposium will focus on the latest findings about HAIs, and three key speakers will discuss the issue and what we can do about it. The formal program starts at 6 p.m., but members of the press are invited to talk one-on-one with our speakers from 5 to 6 p.m. Janet Eagan RN — Manager, Infection Control at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She specializes in infection control in the oncology patient population. Bruce E. Hirsch MD, FACP, AAHIVS — Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital. He is interested in preventive health strategies and the role of healthy bacteria in the human microbiome. Lisa A. Waldowski DNP, PNP, CIC — Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise. She advises surveyors with interpretations and education about infection control findings, and responds to challenging questions, complaints, and potential threat to life/patient safety events. Please take advantage of this unique opportunity to pose your questions to these industry-leading specialists. Here are the details: When: Monday, May 1. The event starts at 5 p.m. with a light buffet, refreshments and networking time; the formal program runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Holiday Inn 215 Sunnyside Blvd, Plainview, NY 11803 Please RSVP to (516) 579-4711 or 516-830-0831 Pulse's Mission: To raise awareness about patient safety through advocacy, education and support.

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