North Shore University Hospital

North Bay Shore, NY, United States

North Shore University Hospital

North Bay Shore, NY, United States
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News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Interview Infection-Prevention Experts at Pulse CPSEA's Spring Symposium, 'Infection Prevention: It Begins with You!' Healthcare reporters are invited to speak personally with leading national experts in the prevention of healthcare-acquired infections in advance of Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education & Advocacy’s Spring Symposium, Infection Prevention: It Begins with You! in Plainview, N.Y., at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 1. It’s bad enough being in the hospital, but it can be so much worse when a patient contracts an “HAI” — a Healthcare-Acquired Infection — while there. Despite the best efforts of the medical profession, growing numbers of patients still contract infections in health care facilities. This is one of the most critical challenges facing the medical profession today. Pulse’s symposium will focus on the latest findings about HAIs, and three key speakers will discuss the issue and what we can do about it. The formal program starts at 6 p.m., but members of the press are invited to talk one-on-one with our speakers from 5 to 6 p.m. Janet Eagan RN — Manager, Infection Control at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She specializes in infection control in the oncology patient population. Bruce E. Hirsch MD, FACP, AAHIVS — Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital. He is interested in preventive health strategies and the role of healthy bacteria in the human microbiome. Lisa A. Waldowski DNP, PNP, CIC — Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise. She advises surveyors with interpretations and education about infection control findings, and responds to challenging questions, complaints, and potential threat to life/patient safety events. Please take advantage of this unique opportunity to pose your questions to these industry-leading specialists. Here are the details: When: Monday, May 1. The event starts at 5 p.m. with a light buffet, refreshments and networking time; the formal program runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Holiday Inn 215 Sunnyside Blvd, Plainview, NY 11803 Please RSVP to (516) 579-4711 or 516-830-0831 Pulse's Mission: To raise awareness about patient safety through advocacy, education and support.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Interview Infection-Prevention Experts at Pulse CPSEA's Spring Symposium, 'Infection Prevention: It Begins with You!' Healthcare reporters are invited to speak personally with leading national experts in the prevention of healthcare-acquired infections in advance of Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education & Advocacy’s Spring Symposium, Infection Prevention: It Begins with You! in Plainview, N.Y., at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 1. It’s bad enough being in the hospital, but it can be so much worse when a patient contracts an “HAI” — a Healthcare-Acquired Infection — while there. Despite the best efforts of the medical profession, growing numbers of patients still contract infections in health care facilities. This is one of the most critical challenges facing the medical profession today. Pulse’s symposium will focus on the latest findings about HAIs, and three key speakers will discuss the issue and what we can do about it. The formal program starts at 6 p.m., but members of the press are invited to talk one-on-one with our speakers from 5 to 6 p.m. Janet Eagan RN — Manager, Infection Control at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She specializes in infection control in the oncology patient population. Bruce E. Hirsch MD, FACP, AAHIVS — Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital. He is interested in preventive health strategies and the role of healthy bacteria in the human microbiome. Lisa A. Waldowski DNP, PNP, CIC — Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise. She advises surveyors with interpretations and education about infection control findings, and responds to challenging questions, complaints, and potential threat to life/patient safety events. Please take advantage of this unique opportunity to pose your questions to these industry-leading specialists. Here are the details: When: Monday, May 1. The event starts at 5 p.m. with a light buffet, refreshments and networking time; the formal program runs from 6 to 8 p.m. Where: Holiday Inn 215 Sunnyside Blvd, Plainview, NY 11803 Please RSVP to (516) 579-4711 or 516-830-0831 Pulse's Mission: To raise awareness about patient safety through advocacy, education and support.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

People who often drink soda, with sugar or without it, may be more likely to develop memory problems and have smaller brain volumes, according to two recent studies. In one study, researchers found that people who drank diet soda every day were three times more likely to have a stroke or develop dementia over 10 years than those who did not consume any diet soda. In the second study, the same researchers concluded that people who consumed at least one diet soda a day had smaller brain volumes than those who did not drink any diet soda. Moreover, that same study found that people who consumed more than two sugary beverages such as soda or fruit juice a day had smaller brain volumes and worse memory function that those who did not consume any such beverages. [7 Biggest Diet Myths] Although both studies show that there is a link between drinking diet or sugary beverages and certain health outcomes, the results do not mean that consuming such beverages directly causes these outcomes, said the lead author of both studies, Matthew P. Pase, a neurology researcher at Boston University School of Medicine. In the first study, published April 20 in the journal Stroke, the researchers interviewed about 4,300 people, ages 45 and older, three times over seven years, and asked them whether they drank any diet or sugary beverages. Then, toward the end of the seven-year period, the scientists began to monitor the study participants' health for cases of stroke and dementia, and continued to do so for the next 10 years. During this period, 97 people had a stroke and 81 people developed dementia — a number that included 63 cases of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers found that the daily consumption of diet beverages, but not sugary beverages, was linked to a higher risk of stroke and dementia over the 10-year period. The reasons behind these findings are not clear, but previous research had linked the consumption of diet drinks with obesity and diabetes, which might also be linked to with poor blood circulation, Pase said. Problems with circulation may contribute to a person's risk of stroke or dementia because the brain relies on a constant supply of blood to function well, he said. The findings of this study suggest that turning to diet beverages in the hope of avoiding extra calories from sugary drinks may not be a good idea, said Dr. Paul Wright, chairman of neurology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, New York, who was not involved in the study. "The right direction to go in is to have plain water," or other beverages that do not contain artificial sweeteners, he told Live Science. [7 Foods You Can Overdose On] In the second study, published in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia, the researchers looked at brain scans and results of cognitive tests conducted in about 4,000 people. The scientists also asked the study participants if they consumed any diet or sugary beverages, and, if so, how much. The data revealed a link between the consumption of both diet and sugary beverages and smaller brain volumes. Moreover, the researchers found a link between the consumption of sugary beverages and poorer memory. All of those outcomes are risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said. As with the first study, the mechanisms that might underlie the link between the consumption of sugary beverages and these outcomes are unclear, Pase told Live Science. However, previous research has linked high sugar intake with diabetes and high blood pressure — conditions linked to compromised blood circulation that may ultimately affect brain health, he said.


Three leaders in preventing healthcare-associated infections discuss how patients can stay safer in hospital. There’s one place you never want to “go viral”: in the hospital (or in the clinic, nursing home, rehab facility, or even the dentist’s office.) HAIs — hospital-acquired or healthcare-associated infections — claim the lives of tens of thousands of patients in the US every year, and harm countless more. (And it’s not just viruses: bacteria can be just as dangerous.) At a symposium held in Plainview, NY on May 1, an audience heard three leading infection-prevention specialists discuss the ways good patient safety protocols can reduce that toll. The event, one of an annual series hosted by Pulse Center for Patient Safety Education and Advocacy (CPSEA), brought together members of the public and healthcare professionals to hear Janet Eagan, RN (Manager, Infection Control at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center), Dr. Bruce E. Hirsch (Attending Physician, Div. of Infectious Diseases, North Shore University Hospital) and Lisa Wandowski DNP, PNP, CIC (Infection Control Specialist, Standards Interpretation Group, The Joint Commission Enterprise) analyze this serious and growing problem. After the Symposium participants were asked to complete evaluations of what they had learned. Some of the comments were: -       Patients and their advocates need to make sure all medical staff wash hands before approaching the bedside. (Sterile gloves are not a substitute!) -       Having a colonoscopy? Ask about the facility’s equipment sanitation routine: scopes used in colonoscopies are often not sterilized, just sanitized. -       Overuse of powerful antibiotics is a serious issue, encouraging the rise of resistant “superbugs,” compromising patients’ healthy microbiomes, and polluting the environment. -       Dangerous intestinal infections such as “C-Diff” can be successfully treated with “fecal transplants” containing healthy bacteria. In addition to its annual symposia, Pulse — the only grassroots patient safety organization on Long Island — provides a wide range of education, training, and direct work with vulnerable segments of the population. Visit www.pulsecenterforpatientsafety.org to learn more. To discuss this or other patient safety issues with Pulse President Ilene Corina, call (516) 579-4711.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Akebia Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:AKBA), a biopharmaceutical company focused on delivering innovative therapies to patients with kidney disease through the biology of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), today announced the appointment of Rita Jain, M.D. as Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Jain will be responsible for leading the clinical development of the Company’s HIF pipeline, including the global Phase 3 development program for vadadustat, an oral HIF stabilizer in development for the treatment of anemia related to chronic kidney disease. Dr. Jain succeeds Brad Maroni, M.D. who will remain at Akebia as a medical advisor. “Rita has more than 20 years of drug development experience, and having directed multiple registration trials as well as a large cardiovascular patient outcomes-driven trial, her expertise will be particularly relevant to her role at Akebia,” said John P. Butler, President and Chief Executive Officer of Akebia. “Her experience working with key opinion leaders and collaborators will be important as we complete clinical development of vadadustat, prepare for regulatory submissions and set the stage for commercialization. I’d like to thank Brad for his many contributions to the development of vadadustat and our pipeline, and we are pleased that he will be an advisor to Akebia.” Dr. Jain joins Akebia from AbbVie where she most recently was the Vice President of Men’s and Women’s Health and Metabolic Development. During her time at AbbVie and Abbott she oversaw the development of more than 15 new chemical entities and marketed products. She has also held leadership roles at Pharmacia Corp, as well as a faculty position at the North Shore University Hospital where she was the Director of the Program in Novel Therapeutics. Dr. Jain earned her M.D. at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Medicine and her B.S. from LIU/C.W. Post. “I am excited to join Akebia at a pivotal time in the global Phase 3 development program for vadadustat,” said Dr. Jain. “The strong foundation of clinical data from 15 trials of vadadustat gives me great confidence in our Phase 3 program, and underscores the potential of vadadustat to help patients living with anemia related to chronic kidney disease. I look forward to working with my colleagues at Akebia, investigators and the regulatory authorities to bring this innovative treatment to patients.” About Anemia Associated with CKD Anemia results from the body's inability to coordinate red blood cell production in response to lower oxygen levels due to the progressive loss of kidney function with inadequate erythropoietin production. Left untreated, anemia significantly accelerates patients' overall deterioration of health with increased morbidity and mortality. Anemia is currently treated with injectable recombinant erythropoiesis stimulating agents, which are associated with inconsistent hemoglobin responses and well-documented safety risks. The prevalence of anemia increases with the severity of CKD and is higher in people with CKD who are over age 60. Akebia Therapeutics, Inc. is a biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, focused on delivering innovative therapies to patients with kidney disease through hypoxia-inducible factor biology. Akebia's lead product candidate, vadadustat, is an oral, investigational therapy in development for the treatment of anemia related to chronic kidney disease in both non-dialysis and dialysis patients. Akebia's global Phase 3 program for vadadustat, which includes the PRO TECT studies for non-dialysis patients with anemia secondary to chronic kidney disease and the INNO VATE studies for dialysis-dependent patients, is currently ongoing. For more information, please visit our website at www.akebia.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements include those about Akebia's strategy, future plans and prospects, including statements regarding the potential commercialization of vadadustat if approved by regulatory authorities, and the potential indications and benefits of vadadustat. The words “anticipate,” “appear,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “predict,” “project,” “target,” “potential,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “continue,” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. Each forward-looking statement is subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in such statement, including the risk that existing preclinical and clinical data may not be predictive of the results of ongoing or later clinical trials; the funding required to develop Akebia's product candidates and operate the company, and the actual expenses associated therewith; the actual costs incurred in the Phase 3 studies of vadadustat and the availability of financing to cover such costs; the timing and content of decisions made by the FDA and other regulatory authorities; the actual time it takes to initiate and complete research and development; the success of competitors in developing product candidates for diseases for which Akebia is currently developing its product candidates; and Akebia's ability to obtain, maintain and enforce patent and other intellectual property protection for vadadustat and its other product candidates. Other risks and uncertainties include those identified under the heading "Risk Factors" in Akebia's Annual Report on Form 10-Q for quarter ended March 31, 2017, and other filings that Akebia may make with the Securities and Exchange Commission in the future. Akebia does not undertake, and specifically disclaims, any obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this press release.


Richard B. Jacaruso, MD, Cardiologist currently working at Island Wide Medical Associates, and affiliated with Winthrop-University Hospital and North Shore University Hospital, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Garden City, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso is a highly experienced cardiologist who has been in practice for nearly three decades. His medical career began in 1987, when he graduated from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. After an internship at New York’s Peninsula Hospital Center, he completed a residency and fellowship at Winthrop-University Hospital, with whom he is still affiliated. Dr. Jacaruso is triple board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, and Nuclear Cardiology. With his wealth of experience to call upon, he diagnoses and treats a wide range of conditions related to the heart. These include congenital heart disease and defects, heart murmurs and palpitations, thrombosis, cardiomyopathy, and aortic aneurysms. Expert procedures carried out by him include echocardiography and pacemaker insertion and replacement. Dr. Jacaruso is renowned not only for his clinical excellence, but also for his use of the very latest technology, bringing excellent results to his patients and speeding up typical recovery times. His dedication and expertise makes Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso a very deserving winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


Richard B. Jacaruso, MD, Cardiologist currently working at Island Wide Medical Associates, and affiliated with Winthrop-University Hospital and North Shore University Hospital, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Garden City, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso is a highly experienced cardiologist who has been in practice for nearly three decades. His medical career began in 1987, when he graduated from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. After an internship at New York’s Peninsula Hospital Center, he completed a residency and fellowship at Winthrop-University Hospital, with whom he is still affiliated. Dr. Jacaruso is triple board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, and Nuclear Cardiology. With his wealth of experience to call upon, he diagnoses and treats a wide range of conditions related to the heart. These include congenital heart disease and defects, heart murmurs and palpitations, thrombosis, cardiomyopathy, and aortic aneurysms. Expert procedures carried out by him include echocardiography and pacemaker insertion and replacement. Dr. Jacaruso is renowned not only for his clinical excellence, but also for his use of the very latest technology, bringing excellent results to his patients and speeding up typical recovery times. His dedication and expertise makes Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso a very deserving winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


LOUISVILLE, Ky.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--There are now two reasons for patients to flinch at the touch of a stethoscope: because it’s cold, of course; and because it’s covered with germs. A new study1 from medical researchers reveals that 80 percent of the stethoscopes they studied were contaminated by high concentrations of bacteria, so much so that they present as much risk of transferring infectious bacteria as the hands of physicians after a physical exam. The study, published by American Journal of Infection Control, compared bacteria loads on today’s standard stethoscopes and scopes fabricated with antimicrobial copper alloys that continuously kill 99.9 percent of bacteria. CuVerro® is a leading producer of EPA-registered antimicrobial copper. Researchers discovered that stethoscopes made with traditional materials on the chest pieces, tubing, and diaphragms expose patients to an average of 127.1 CFUs (colony forming units of bacteria). In contrast, the stethoscopes made with antimicrobial copper exposed patients to an average of only 11.7 CFUs. The copper-alloy devices carried bacteria burdens 91 percent lower than standard scopes. This difference could be significant in an age where patients and medical professionals are increasingly concerned about the incidence of transmitting bacteria that cause healthcare-associated infections, a problem that results in 99,000 patient deaths each year in US hospitals and leads to annual direct and indirect costs totaling between $96 and $147 billion.2 The study, led by Dr. Michael G. Schmidt, Vice Chairman of Microbiology and Immunology at the Medical University of South Carolina, pointed to evidence that there is only a one-in-ten chance that health professionals routinely disinfect their stethoscopes, making the effects of incorporating copper into the design of stethoscopes even more compelling. The report noted there isn’t a “consistently applied routine of cleaning and disinfecting stethoscopes between patient encounters” even though they come in frequent contact with the "unsanitized skin of patients and the hands, face, neck and clothing of health care workers.” “Based on these trial results,” Dr. Schmidt noted, “we can say that adding antimicrobial copper stethoscopes to a healthcare facility’s bundle of infection control measures would likely help to limit the spread of infectious agents. In other studies, antimicrobial copper touch surfaces have been demonstrated to work in concert with existing hygiene procedures to help create safer environments.” The stethoscope study was conducted variously at the Medical University of South Carolina’s Children’s Hospital, the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of New Mexico, and North Shore University Hospital in New York. CuVerro is manufactured by GBC Metals, LLC, doing business as Olin Brass, a wholly owned subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper, Inc. which is a subsidiary of Global Brass and Copper Holdings, Inc. (NYSE:BRSS), the leading manufacturer and distributor of copper, copper‐alloy and bactericidal copper sheet, strip, plate, foil, rod, ingot and fabricated components in North America and one of the largest in the world. GBC Metals engages in the melting, casting, rolling, drawing, extruding and stamping of specialized copper and copper alloys finished products from scrap, cathode and other refined metals. (OB‐0034‐1510)


Richard B. Jacaruso, DO, FACC, FASNC, FACP, Cardiologist currently working at Island Wide Medical Associates, and affiliated with Winthrop-University Hospital and North Shore University Hospital, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Garden City, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso is a highly experienced cardiologist who has been in practice for nearly three decades. His medical career began in 1987, when he graduated from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. After an internship at New York’s Peninsula Hospital Center, he completed a residency and fellowship at Winthrop-University Hospital, with whom he is still affiliated. Dr. Jacaruso is triple board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, and Nuclear Cardiology. With his wealth of experience to call upon, he diagnoses and treats a wide range of conditions related to the heart. These include heart valve disease, heart murmurs and palpitations, thrombosis, cardiomyopathy, and aortic aneurysms. Expert procedures carried out by him include echocardiography, among others. Dr. Jacaruso is renowned not only for his clinical excellence, but also for his use of the very latest technology, bringing excellent results to his patients and speeding up typical recovery times. He has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American College of Cardiology, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the American College of Physicians. His dedication and expertise makes Dr. Richard B. Jacaruso a very deserving winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


Qiao J.,Peking University | Feng H.L.,North Shore University Hospital
Human Reproduction Update | Year: 2011

Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common metabolic dysfunction and heterogeneous endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Although patients with PCOS are typically characterized by increased numbers of oocytes retrieved during IVF, they are often of poor quality, leading to lower fertilization, cleavage and implantation rates, and a higher miscarriage rate. METHODS: For this review, we searched the database Medline: (1950 to January 2010) and Google for all full texts and/or abstract articles published in English with content related to oocyte maturation and embryo developmental competence. Results: The search showed that alteration of many factors may directly or indirectly impair the competence of maturating oocytes through endocrine and local paracrine/autocrine actions, resulting in a lower pregnancy rate in patients with PCOS. The extra-ovarian factors identified included gonadotrophins, hyperandrogenemia and hyperinsulinemia, although intra-ovarian factors included members of the epidermal, fibroblast, insulin-like and neurotrophin families of growth factors, as well as the cytokines. Conclusions: Any abnormality in the extra- and/or intra-ovarian factors may negatively affect the granulosa cell-oocyte interaction, oocyte maturation and potential embryonic developmental competence, contributing to unsuccessful outcomes for patients with PCOS who are undergoing assisted reproduction. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

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