North Shore, New Zealand
North Shore, New Zealand

Time filter

Source Type

Bourne C.,NSW Sexually Transmitted Infections Programs Unit | Allen D.,Holden Street Sexual Health Clinic | Brown K.,Illawarra Sexual Health Services | Davies S.C.,North Shore Sexual Health Service | And 11 more authors.
Sexual Health | Year: 2013

Background: In New South Wales (NSW), publicly funded sexual health services (PFSHSs) target the populations at greatest risk for important sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and so may make a large contribution to the diagnosis of notifiable STIs. We aimed to determine the proportions of STIs diagnosed in PFSHSs and notified to the NSW Ministry of Health in 2009, and describe geographical variations. Methods: The number of notifiable STIs (infectious syphilis, gonorrhoea, HIV and chlamydia) diagnosed in 2009 was obtained for each Area Health Service (AHS) and each PFSHS. The proportion of diagnoses made by PFSHSs was calculated at the state and AHS level according to five geographical regions: inner and outer metropolitan, regional, rural and remote. Results: The overall proportions of diagnoses made by NSW PFSHSs were syphilis, 25%; gonorrhoea, 25%; HIV, 21%; and chlamydia, 14%. Within each zone, the proportions of these STIs were (respectively): (i) inner metropolitan: 32%, 26%, 21% and 13%; (ii) outer metropolitan: 41%, 24%, 43% and 9%; (iii) regional: 62%, 15%, 23% and 10%; (iv) rural: 8%, 29%, <5% and 20%; and (v) remote: <5%, 43%, <5% and 29%. There was considerable variation in proportions of STIs between and within AHSs (<5-100%). Conclusions: NSW PFSHSs contribute a large proportion of diagnoses for syphilis, gonorrhoea and HIV, but less so for chlamydia. Across AHSs and zones, there was considerable variation in the proportions. These data support the role of PFSHS in identifying and managing important STIs in high-risk populations. © CSIRO 2013.


Conway D.P.,University of New South Wales | Conway D.P.,St George Hospital | Guy R.,University of New South Wales | Mcnulty A.,Sydney Hospital | And 30 more authors.
HIV Medicine | Year: 2015

Objectives: Rapid HIV testing (RHT) is well established in many countries, but it is new in Australia since a policy change in 2011. We assessed service provider acceptability of RHT before and after its implementation in four Sydney public sexual health clinics. Methods: Service providers were surveyed immediately after training in RHT and again 6-12 months later. Differences in mean scores between survey rounds were assessed via t-tests, with stratification by profession and the number of tests performed. Results: RHT was rated as highly acceptable among staff at baseline and acceptability scores improved between survey rounds. Belief in being sufficiently skilled and experienced to perform RHT (P=0.004) and confidence in the delivery of nonreactive results increased (P=0.007), while the belief that RHT was disruptive declined (P=0.001). Acceptability was higher for staff who had performed a greater number of tests regarding comfort with their role in RHT (P=0.004) and belief that patients were satisfied with RHT (P=0.007). Compared with nurses, doctors had a stronger preference for a faster rapid test (P=0.027) and were more likely to agree that RHT interfered with consultations (P=0.014). Conclusions: Differences in responses between professions may reflect differences in staff roles, the type of patients seen by staff and the model of testing used, all of which may affect the number of tests performed by staff. These findings may inform planning for how best to implement RHT in clinical services. © 2015 British HIV Association.


Bourne C.,ANSW Sexually Transmitted Infections Programs Unit | Allen D.,Holden Street Sexual Health Clinic | Brown K.,Illawarra Sexual Health Services | Davies S.C.,North Shore Sexual Health Service | And 11 more authors.
Sexual Health | Year: 2013

Background: In New South Wales (NSW), publicly funded sexual health services (PFSHSs) target the populations at greatest risk for important sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and so may make a large contribution to the diagnosis of notifiable STIs. We aimed to determine the proportions of STIs diagnosed in PFSHSs and notified to the NSW Ministry of Health in 2009, and describe geographical variations. Methods: The number of notifiable STIs (infectious syphilis, gonorrhoea, HIV and chlamydia) diagnosed in 2009 was obtained for each Area Health Service (AHS) and each PFSHS. The proportion of diagnoses made by PFSHSs was calculated at the state and AHS level according to five geographical regions: inner and outer metropolitan, regional, rural and remote. Results: The overall proportions of diagnoses made by NSW PFSHSs were syphilis, 25%; gonorrhoea, 25%; HIV, 21%; and chlamydia, 14%. Within each zone, the proportions of these STIs were (respectively): (i) inner metropolitan: 32%, 26%, 21% and 13%; (ii) outer metropolitan: 41%, 24%, 43% and 9%; (iii) regional: 62%, 15%, 23% and 10%; (iv) rural: 8%, 29%, <5% and 20%; and (v) remote: <5%, 43%, <5% and 29%. There was considerable variation in proportions of STIs between and within AHSs (<5-100%). Conclusions: NSW PFSHSs contribute a large proportion of diagnoses for syphilis, gonorrhoea and HIV, but less so for chlamydia. Across AHSs and zones, there was considerable variation in the proportions. These data support the role of PFSHS in identifying and managing important STIs in high-risk populations. © 2013 CSIRO.

Loading North Shore Sexual Health Service collaborators
Loading North Shore Sexual Health Service collaborators