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Tatton-Brown K.,Institute of Cancer Research | Tatton-Brown K.,Cancer Genetics Unit | Tatton-Brown K.,St Georges, University of London | Seal S.,Institute of Cancer Research | And 22 more authors.
Nature Genetics | Year: 2014

Overgrowth disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by increased growth parameters and other variable clinical features such as intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. To identify new causes of human overgrowth, we performed exome sequencing in ten proband-parent trios and detected two de novo DNMT3A mutations. We identified 11 additional de novo mutations by sequencing DNMT3A in a further 142 individuals with overgrowth. The mutations alter residues in functional DNMT3A domains, and protein modeling suggests that they interfere with domain-domain interactions and histone binding. Similar mutations were not present in 1,000 UK population controls (13/152 cases versus 0/1,000 controls; P < 0.0001). Mutation carriers had a distinctive facial appearance, intellectual disability and greater height. DNMT3A encodes a DNA methyltransferase essential for establishing methylation during embryogenesis and is commonly somatically mutated in acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, DNMT3A joins an emerging group of epigenetic DNA- and histone-modifying genes associated with both developmental growth disorders and hematological malignancies. © 2014 Nature America, Inc. Source


Middleton A.,Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute | Patch C.,Guys Hospital | Wiggins J.,Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust | Barnes K.,James Cook University | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2014

The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics released recommendations for reporting incidental findings (IFs) in clinical exome and genome sequencing. These suggest 'opportunistic genomic screening' should be available to both adults and children each time a sequence is done and would be undertaken without seeking preferences from the patient first. Should opportunistic genomic screening be implemented in the United Kingdom, the Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors (AGNC), which represents British and Irish genetic counsellors and nurses, feels strongly that the following must be considered (see article for complete list): (1) Following appropriate genetic counselling, patients should be allowed to consent to or opt out of opportunistic genomic screening. (2) If true IFs are discovered the AGNC are guided by the report from the Joint Committee on Medical Genetics about the sharing of genetic testing results. (3) Children should not be routinely tested for adult-onset conditions. (4) The formation of a list of variants should involve a representative from the AGNC as well as a patient support group. (5) The variants should be for serious or life-threatening conditions for which there are treatments or preventative strategies available. (6) There needs to be robust evidence that the benefits of opportunistic screening outweigh the potential harms. (7) The clinical validity and utility of variants should be known. (8) There must be a quality assurance framework that operates to International standards for laboratory testing. (9) Psychosocial research is urgently needed in this area to understand the impact on patients. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved. Source


Korbonits M.,Queen Mary, University of London | Storr H.,Queen Mary, University of London | Kumar A.V.,North East Thames Regional Genetics Service
Clinical Endocrinology | Year: 2012

Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas (FIPA), an autosomal dominant disease with low penetrance is being increasingly recognized. FIPA families can be divided into two distinct groups based on genetic and phenotypic features. Patients with mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene are characterized by young-onset somatotroph or lactotroph macroadenomas, while in the other, larger group of FIPA patients with typically adult-onset disease and more varied adenoma types, no causative gene(s) has been identified. Young-onset macroadenoma patients can also be identified with germline AIP mutation without an apparent family history. Further data and longer follow-up are necessary to establish formal guidelines, but the current data suggest genetic screening of the AIP gene in patients with a pituitary adenoma and no other associated features who have (i) a family history of pituitary adenoma, (ii) childhood-onset pituitary adenoma or (iii) a pituitary somatotroph or lactotroph macroadenoma diagnosed before the age of 30 years. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Source


Twigg S.R.F.,Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine | Vorgia E.,Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas | Vorgia E.,University of Crete | Mcgowan S.J.,Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine | And 28 more authors.
Nature Genetics | Year: 2013

The extracellular signal-related kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) are key proteins mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling downstream of RAS: phosphorylation of ERK1/2 leads to nuclear uptake and modulation of multiple targets. Here, we show that reduced dosage of ERF, which encodes an inhibitory ETS transcription factor directly bound by ERK1/2 (refs. 2,3,4,5,6,7), causes complex craniosynostosis (premature fusion of the cranial sutures) in humans and mice. Features of this newly recognized clinical disorder include multiple-suture synostosis, craniofacial dysmorphism, Chiari malformation and language delay. Mice with functional Erf levels reduced to ∼30% of normal exhibit postnatal multiple-suture synostosis; by contrast, embryonic calvarial development appears mildly delayed. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and high-throughput sequencing, we find that ERF binds preferentially to elements away from promoters that contain RUNX or AP-1 motifs. This work identifies ERF as a novel regulator of osteogenic stimulation by RAS-ERK signaling, potentially by competing with activating ETS factors in multifactor transcriptional complexes. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Sharma V.P.,Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine | Sharma V.P.,University of Oxford | Fenwick A.L.,Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine | Brockop M.S.,University of Southern California | And 25 more authors.
Nature Genetics | Year: 2013

Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of the cranial sutures, is a heterogeneous disorder with a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,200 (refs. 1,2). A specific genetic etiology can be identified in ∼21% of cases, including mutations of TWIST1, which encodes a class II basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, and causes Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, typically associated with coronal synostosis. Using exome sequencing, we identified 38 heterozygous TCF12 mutations in 347 samples from unrelated individuals with craniosynostosis. The mutations predominantly occurred in individuals with coronal synostosis and accounted for 32% and 10% of subjects with bilateral and unilateral pathology, respectively. TCF12 encodes one of three class I E proteins that heterodimerize with class II bHLH proteins such as TWIST1. We show that TCF12 and TWIST1 act synergistically in a transactivation assay and that mice doubly heterozygous for loss-of-function mutations in Tcf12 and Twist1 have severe coronal synostosis. Hence, the dosage of TCF12-TWIST1 heterodimers is critical for normal coronal suture development. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. Source

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