Entity

Time filter

Source Type

North District, Hong Kong

Lui T.H.,North District Hospital
Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery | Year: 2014

About 10% to 25% of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon go undiagnosed for some time beyond what would be optimal for repair and a return to optimal function. Managing these chronic or neglected ruptures is a surgical challenge, because the tendon ends retract and atrophy and could develop a short, fibrous distal stump. In the present report, a patient with a ruptured right Achilles tendon, neglected for approximately 10years, is described. The chronically injured tendon was successfully treated by overwrapping the interposed scar at the rupture site. This minimally invasive technique restored tension to the tendon, a prerequisite for which was the presence of functional triceps surae, confirmed by identification of gross contraction of the muscle during tiptoeing. The procedure is contraindicated when the scar tissue is not intact and does not have sufficient laxity to allow adequate dorsiflexion of the ankle after overwrapping the tendon or when the triceps surae are nonfunctional. © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.


Lui T.H.,North District Hospital
Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery | Year: 2013

Tendon pain after repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture can result from suture granuloma formation, modification of the threshold of the pain receptors inside the tendon by scar tissue, expansion of the paratenon by tendon enlargement with secondary stimulation of mechanoreceptors, or underlying tendon degeneration. In the present technique report, an endoscopic technique of Achilles tenolysis for denervation and debulking is described that might be applicable in cases in which conservative treatment fails to alleviate the pain. © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.


Lui T.H.,North District Hospital
Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery | Year: 2013

A subchondral cyst of the talus frequently occurs with an osteochondral lesion of the talar dome. Debridement, curettage, and bone grafting through the articular defect was frequently the recommended treatment in reported studies for a massive cyst. We report a case of a massive cyst of the talar body with a small osteochondral lesion of the talar dome. Our patient was successfully treated by curettage and bone grafting of the cyst using posterior ankle arthroscopy, with minimal disruption of the articular surface of the talar dome. © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.


Lui T.H.,North District Hospital
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy | Year: 2015

Disorders of the proximal tibiofibular joint should be kept in mind in the evaluation of lateral knee pain. They include osteoarthrosis, rheumatic disease, traumatic subluxation or dislocation, ganglion or synovial cysts, synostosis, synovial chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis and hypomobility of the joint. Peroneal nerve can be at risk with pathologies of the joint either by compressive effect or formation of intra-neural ganglion. A case of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint was reported which presented with lateral knee pain. It was successfully treated by arthroscopic synovectomy. Level of evidence V. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Lui T.H.,North District Hospital
Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery | Year: 2014

Subtalar arthroereisis has been used for the treatment of symptomatic flexible flatfoot deformities in both pediatric and adult patients. Chronic sinus tarsi pain is the most common complication of this procedure and can be relieved by removal of the implant. We describe a case of spontaneous fusion of the subtalar joint after arthroereisis. This is an irreversible complication that should be described to the patient as a rare, but possible, outcome of arthroereisis of the subtalar joint. © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.

Discover hidden collaborations