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Shi Q.,North Central Cancer Treatment Group
Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2013

With improved patient care, better diagnosis, and more treatment options after tumor recurrence, outcomes after fluorouracil (FU) -based treatment are expected to have improved over time in early-stage colon cancer. Data from 18,449 patients enrolled onto 21 phase III trials conducted from 1978 to 2002 were evaluated for potential differences in time to recurrence (TTR), time from recurrence to death (TRD), and overall survival (OS) with regard to FU-based adjuvant regimens. Trials were predefined as old versus newer era using initial accrual before or after 1995. Outcomes were compared between patients enrolled onto old- or newer-era trials, stratified by stage. Within the first 3 years, recurrence rates were lower in newer- versus old-era trials for patients with stage II disease, with no differences among those with stage III disease. Both TRD and OS were significantly longer in newer-era trials overall and within each stage. The lymph node (LN) ratio (ie, number of positive nodes divided by total nodes harvested) in those with stage III disease declined over time. TTR improved slightly, with larger number of LNs examined in both stages. Improved TRD in newer trials supports the premise that more aggressive intervention (oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapy and/or surgery for recurrent disease) improves OS for patients previously treated in the adjuvant setting. Lower recurrence rates with identical treatments in those with stage II disease enrolled onto newer-era trials reflect stage migration over time, calling into question historical data related to the benefit of FU-based adjuvant therapy in such patients. Source


Schneider B.P.,Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group | Zhao F.,ECOG | Wang M.,ECOG | Stearns V.,ECOG | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2012

Purpose: Neuropathy is a common and potentially disabling complication of adjuvant taxane therapy. Recent studies have identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with taxane-induced neuropathy. Therefore, we sought to determine whether neuropathy was associated with breast cancer recurrence in a clinical trial population who received adjuvant taxane therapy. Patients and Methods: Trial E1199 included 4,554 eligible women with operable breast cancer who received up to four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide every 3 weeks followed by paclitaxel 175 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks for four cycles (P3), paclitaxel 80 mg/m 2 weekly for 12 cycles (P1), docetaxel 100 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks for four cycles (D3), or docetaxel 35 mg/m 2 weekly for 12 cycles (D1). A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the relationship between neuropathy and disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS) by treating neuropathy status as a time dependent covariate and using a landmark analysis. Results: Of 4,554 patients who received at least one taxane dose, grade 2 to 4 neuropathy developed in 18%, 22%, 15%, and 13% of patients in the P3, P1, D3, and D1 arms, respectively. In a model that included age, race, obesity, menopausal status, tumor size, nodal status, treatment arm, neuropathy, and hyperglycemia, no significant relationship was found between neuropathy and DFS, OS, or RFS. Conclusion: There was no association between taxane-induced neuropathy and outcome. © 2012 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Source


Yothers G.,N-of-One | Yothers G.,University of Pittsburgh | Sargent D.J.,Mayo Clinic Cancer Center | Sargent D.J.,North Central Cancer Treatment Group | And 13 more authors.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute | Year: 2011

Conclusion Background Among patients with resected colon cancer, black patients have worse survival than whites. We investigated whether disparities in survival and related endpoints would persist when patients were treated with identical therapies in controlled clinical trials.Conclusion Methods We assessed 14611 patients (1218 black and 13393 white) who received standardized adjuvant treatment in 12 randomized controlled clinical trials conducted in North America for resected stage II and stage III colon cancer between 1977 and 2002. Individual patient data on covariates and outcomes were extracted from the Adjuvant Colon Cancer ENdpoinTs (ACCENT) database. The endpoints examined in this meta-analysis were overall survival (time to death), recurrence-free survival (time to recurrence or death), and recurrence-free interval (time to recurrence). Cox models were stratified by study and controlled for sex, stage, age, and treatment to determine the effect of race. Kaplan-Meier estimates were adjusted for similar covariates to control for confounding. All statistical tests were two-sided.Conclusion Results Black patients were younger than whites (median age, 58 vs 61 years, respectively; P <. 001) and more likely to be female (55% vs 45%, respectively; P <. 001). Overall survival was worse in black patients than whites (hazard ratio [HR] of death = 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 1.34, P <. 001). Five-year overall survival rates for blacks and whites were 68.2% and 72.8%, respectively. When subsets defined by sex, stage, and age were analyzed, overall survival was consistently worse in black patients. Recurrence-free survival was worse in black patients than whites (HR of recurrence or death = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.24, P =. 0045). Three-year recurrence-free survival rates in blacks and whites were 68.4% and 72.1%, respectively. In contrast, recurrence-free interval was similar in black and white patients (HR of recurrence = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.97 to 1.19, P =. 15). Three-year recurrence-free interval rates in blacks and whites were 71.3% and 74.2%, respectively.Conclusion Conclusion sBlack patients with resected stage II and stage III colon cancer who were treated with the same therapy as white patients experienced worse overall and recurrence-free survival, but similar recurrence-free interval, compared with white patients. The differences in survival may be mostly because of factors unrelated to the patients' adjuvant colon cancer treatment. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. Source


Swain S.M.,The Surgical Center | Swain S.M.,Washington Cancer Institute | Jeong J.-H.,University of Pittsburgh | Geyer Jr. C.E.,The Surgical Center | And 26 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2010

BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy regimens that combine anthracyclines and taxanes result in improved disease-free and overall survival among women with operable lymph-node-positive breast cancer. The effectiveness of concurrent versus sequential regimens is not known. METHODS: We randomly assigned 5351 patients with operable, node-positive, early-stage breast cancer to receive four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by four cycles of docetaxel (sequential ACT); four cycles of doxorubicin and docetaxel (doxorubicin- docetaxel); or four cycles of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and docetaxel (concurrent ACT). The primary aims were to examine whether concurrent ACT was more effective than sequential ACT and whether the doxorubicin-docetaxel regimen would be as effective as the concurrent-ACT regimen. The secondary aims were to assess toxic effects and to correlate amenorrhea with outcomes in premenopausal women. Results: At a median follow-up of 73 months, overall survival was improved in the sequential-ACT group (8-year overall survival, 83%) as compared with the doxorubicin-docetaxel group (overall survival, 79%; hazard ratio for death, 0.83; P = 0.03) and the concurrent-ACT group (overall survival, 79%; hazard ratio, 0.86; P = 0.09). Disease-free survival was improved in the sequential-ACT group (8-year disease-free survival, 74%) as compared with the doxorubicin-docetaxel group (disease-free survival, 69%; hazard ratio for recurrence, a second malignant condition, or death, 0.80; P = 0.001) and the concurrent-ACT group (disease-free survival, 69%; hazard ratio, 0.83; P = 0.01). The doxorubicin-docetaxel regimen showed noninferiority to the concurrent-ACT regimen for overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.14). Overall survival was improved in patients with amenorrhea for 6 months or more across all treatment groups, independently of estrogen-receptor status. CONCLUSIONS: Sequential ACT improved disease-free survival as compared with doxorubicin-docetaxel or concurrent ACT, and it improved overall survival as compared with doxorubicin-docetaxel. Amenorrhea was associated with improved survival regardless of the treatment and estrogen-receptor status. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00003782.). Copyright © 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society. Source


Sinicrope F.A.,North Central Cancer Treatment Group | Foster N.R.,North Central Cancer Treatment Group | Yothers G.,National Surgery Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project | Benson A.,Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group | And 6 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND: Although obesity is an established risk factor for developing colon cancer, its prognostic impact and relation to patient sex in colon cancer survivors remains unclear. METHODS: The authors examined the prognostic and predictive impact of the body mass index (BMI) in patients with stage II and III colon carcinoma (N = 25,291) within the Adjuvant Colon Cancer Endpoints (ACCENT) database. BMI was measured at enrollment in randomized trials of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Association of BMI with the time to recurrence (TTR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were determined using Cox regression models. Statistical tests were 2-sided. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 7.8 years, obese and underweight patients had significantly poorer survival compared with overweight and normal-weight patients. In a multivariable analysis, the adverse prognostic impact of BMI was observed among men but not among women (Pinteraction =.0129). Men with class 2 and 3 obesity (BMI ≥35.0 kg/m2) had a statistically significant reduction in DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.33; P =.0297) compared with normal-weight patients. Underweight patients had a significantly shorter TTR and reduced DFS (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09-1.28; P <.0001) that was more significant among men (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.15-1.50; P <.0001) than among women (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.23; P =.0362; Pinteraction =.0340). BMI was not predictive of a benefit from adjuvant treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity and underweight status were associated independently with inferior outcomes in patients with colon cancer who received treatment in adjuvant chemotherapy trials. © 2013 American Cancer Society. Source

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