North Carolina Research Campus

Federal Way, NC, United States

North Carolina Research Campus

Federal Way, NC, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Nieman D.C.,Appalachian State University | Nieman D.C.,North Carolina Research Campus | Ramamoorthy S.,Metabolon | Kay C.D.,North Carolina State University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2017

This study evaluated the effect of ingesting a flavonoid-rich supplement (329 mg/d) on total urine phenolics and shifts in plasma metabolites in overweight/obese female adults using untargeted metabolomics procedures. Participants (N = 103, 18-65 y, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) were randomized to flavonoid (F) or placebo (P) groups for 12 weeks with blood and 24 h urine samples collected prestudy and after 4 and 12 weeks in a parallel design. Supplements were prepared as chewable tablets and included vitamin C, wild bilberry fruit extract, green tea leaf extract, quercetin, caffeine, and omega 3 fatty acids. At 4 weeks, urine total phenolics increased 24% in F versus P with similar changes at 12 weeks (interaction effect, P = 0.041). Groups did not differ in markers of inflammation (IL-6, MCP-1, CRP) or oxidative stress (oxLDL, FRAP). Metabolomics data indicated shifts in 63 biochemicals in F versus P with 70% from the lipid and xenobiotics superpathways. The largest fold changes in F were measured for three gut-derived phenolics including 3-methoxycatechol sulfate, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid sulfate, and 1,2,3-benzenetriol sulfate (interaction effects, p ≤ 0.050). This randomized clinical trial of overweight/obese women showed that 12 weeks ingestion of a mixed flavonoid nutrient supplement was associated with a corresponding increase in urine total phenolics and gut-derived phenolic metabolites. © 2017 American Chemical Society.


Cialdella-Kam L.,Case Western Reserve University | Nieman D.C.,Appalachian State University | Knab A.M.,Queens University of Charlotte | Shanely R.A.,Appalachian State University | And 4 more authors.
Nutrients | Year: 2016

Flavonoids and fish oils have anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating influences. The purpose of this study was to determine if a mixed flavonoid-fish oil supplement (Q-Mix; 1000 mg quercetin, 400 mg isoquercetin, 120 mg epigallocatechin (EGCG) from green tea extract, 400 mg n3-PUFAs (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) (220 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 180 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) from fish oil, 1000 mg vitamin C, 40 mg niacinamide, and 800 µg folic acid) would reduce complications associated with obesity; that is, reduce inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and alter genomic profiles in overweight women. Overweight and obese women (n = 48; age = 40–70 years) were assigned to Q-Mix or placebo groups using randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled procedures. Overnight fasted blood samples were collected at 0 and 10 weeks and analyzed for cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), F2-isoprostanes, and whole-blood-derived mRNA, which was assessed using Affymetrix HuGene-1_1 ST arrays. Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA models for blood analytes and gene expression and pathway and network enrichment methods for gene expression. Plasma levels increased with Q-Mix supplementation by 388% for quercetin, 95% for EPA, 18% for DHA, and 20% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Q-Mix did not alter plasma levels for CRP (p = 0.268), F2-isoprostanes (p = 0.273), and cytokines (p > 0.05). Gene set enrichment analysis revealed upregulation of pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo related to interferon-induced antiviral mechanism (false discovery rate, FDR < 0.001). Overrepresentation analysis further disclosed an inhibition of phagocytosis-related inflammatory pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo. Thus, a 10-week Q-Mix supplementation elicited a significant rise in plasma quercetin, EPA, DHA, and DPA, as well as stimulated an antiviral and inflammation whole-blood transcriptomic response in overweight women. © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


PubMed | North Carolina Research Campus, National University of Singapore, Queens University of Charlotte, Case Western Reserve University and Appalachian State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nutrients | Year: 2016

Flavonoids and fish oils have anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating influences. The purpose of this study was to determine if a mixed flavonoid-fish oil supplement (Q-Mix; 1000 mg quercetin, 400 mg isoquercetin, 120 mg epigallocatechin (EGCG) from green tea extract, 400 mg n3-PUFAs (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) (220 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 180 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) from fish oil, 1000 mg vitamin C, 40 mg niacinamide, and 800 g folic acid) would reduce complications associated with obesity; that is, reduce inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and alter genomic profiles in overweight women. Overweight and obese women (n = 48; age = 40-70 years) were assigned to Q-Mix or placebo groups using randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled procedures. Overnight fasted blood samples were collected at 0 and 10 weeks and analyzed for cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), F-isoprostanes, and whole-blood-derived mRNA, which was assessed using Affymetrix HuGene-1_1 ST arrays. Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA models for blood analytes and gene expression and pathway and network enrichment methods for gene expression. Plasma levels increased with Q-Mix supplementation by 388% for quercetin, 95% for EPA, 18% for DHA, and 20% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Q-Mix did not alter plasma levels for CRP (p = 0.268), F2-isoprostanes (p = 0.273), and cytokines (p > 0.05). Gene set enrichment analysis revealed upregulation of pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo related to interferon-induced antiviral mechanism (false discovery rate, FDR < 0.001). Overrepresentation analysis further disclosed an inhibition of phagocytosis-related inflammatory pathways in Q-Mix vs. placebo. Thus, a 10-week Q-Mix supplementation elicited a significant rise in plasma quercetin, EPA, DHA, and DPA, as well as stimulated an antiviral and inflammation whole-blood transcriptomic response in overweight women.


Knab A.M.,North Carolina Research Campus | Knab A.M.,Appalachian State University | Shanely R.A.,North Carolina Research Campus | Shanely R.A.,Appalachian State University | And 6 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2011

In vitro and animal data suggest that quercetin affects adipogenesis and basal metabolism; however, whether this metabolic effect translates to reductions in body mass or improvement in body composition in humans is unknown. This study investigated 12-week supplementation of 2 different doses of quercetin, combined with vitamin C and niacin, on body mass and composition in a large, heterogeneous group of adults (n = 941; 60% female, 40% male; 18-85 years of age; 45% normal body mass index, 30% overweight, 25% obese). Subjects were randomized into 3 groups, with supplements administered in double-blind fashion: Q500 = 500 mg quercetin·day-1, Q1000 = 1000 mg quercetin·day-1, and placebo. Quercetin supplements were consumed twice daily over a 12-week period, and pre- and poststudy body mass and composition measurements were taken in an overnight fasted state. A general linear model was used to predict change in body mass and composition across groups with adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors. Plasma quercetin increased in a doseresponsive manner in both Q500 and Q1000 groups relative to placebo. After adjustment for confounders, no significant differences in body mass (males interaction p value = 0.721, females p = 0.366) or body composition (males p = 0.650, females p = 0.639) were found between Q500 or Q1000 groups compared with placebo. No group differences in body mass or body composition were found in a subgroup of overweight and obese subjects. High-dose quercetin supplementation (500 and 1000 mg·day-1) for 12 weeks in a large, heterogeneous group of adults did not affect body mass or composition.


Nieman D.C.,Appalachian State University | Nieman D.C.,North Carolina Research Campus | Cialdella-Kam L.,Appalachian State University | Knab A.M.,Appalachian State University | Shanely R.A.,Appalachian State University
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition | Year: 2012

Red pepper spice (RP) and turmeric (TM) are used as flavorings in foods and for medicinal purposes. Utilizing a randomized, doubled-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design (2-week washout), 4-week supplementation with RP (1 g/d) or TM (2.8 g/d) was tested for influences on inflammation and oxidative stress in 62 overweight/obese (body mass index ≥ 27 kg/m2) females (40-75 years) with systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein, CRP ≥ 2 mg/l). Overnight, fasted blood samples were collected pre- and post-supplementation, and analyzed for oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes, oxidized low density lipoprotein), inflammation (CRP and seven inflammatory cytokines), and metabolic profiles using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with multivariate partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Pre- to post-supplementation measures of inflammation and oxidative stress for both RP and TM did not differ when compared to placebo (all interaction effects, P > 0.05), and global metabolic difference scores calculated through PLS-DA were non-significant (both spices, Q2Y < 0.40). These data indicate that 4-week supplementation with RP or TM at culinary levels does not alter oxidative stress or inflammation in overweight/obese females with systemic inflammation, or cause a significant shift in the global metabolic profile. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Yang H.,North Carolina State University | Gurgel P.V.,North Carolina State University | Williams Jr. D.K.,North Carolina State University | Bobay B.G.,North Carolina State University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Molecular Recognition | Year: 2010

Affinity ligand HWRGWV has demonstrated the ability to isolate human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from mammalian cell culture media. The ligand specifically binds hIgG through its Fc portion. This work shows that deglycosylation of hIgG has no influence on its binding to the HWRGWV ligand and the ligand does not compete with Protein A or Protein G in binding hIgG. It is suggested by the mass spectrometry (MS) data and docking simulation that HWRGWV binds to the pFc portion of hIgG and interacts with the amino acids in the loop Ser383-Asn389 (SNGQPEN) located in the CH3 domain. Subsequent modeling has suggested a possible three-dimensional minimized solution structure for the interaction of hIgG and the HWRGWV ligand. The results support the fact that a peptide as small as a hexamer can have specific interactions with large proteins such as hIgG. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Barth B.M.,University of Alaska Fairbanks | Barth B.M.,Pennsylvania State University | Gustafson S.J.,University of Alaska Fairbanks | Gustafson S.J.,North Carolina Research Campus | And 5 more authors.
Cellular Signalling | Year: 2012

A persistent inflammatory reaction is a hallmark of chronic and acute pathologies in the central nervous system (CNS) and greatly exacerbates neuronal degeneration. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) plays a pivotal role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory processes provoking oxidative stress, eicosanoid biosynthesis, and the production of bioactive lipids. We established in neuronal cells that TNFα exposure dramatically increased Mg2+-dependent neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) activity thus generating the bioactive lipid mediator ceramide essential for subsequent NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation and oxidative stress. Since many of the pleiotropic effects of ceramide are attributable to its metabolites, we examined whether ceramide kinase (CerK), converting ceramide to ceramide-1-phosphate, is implicated both in NOX activation and enhanced eicosanoid production in neuronal cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNFα exposure of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma caused a profound increase in CerK activity. Depleting CerK activity using either siRNA or pharmacology completely negated NOX activation and eicosanoid biosynthesis yet, more importantly, rescued neuronal viability in the presence of TNFα. These findings provided evidence for a critical function of ceramide-1-phospate and thus CerK activity in directly linking sphingolipid metabolism to oxidative stress. This vital role of CerK in CNS inflammation could provide a novel therapeutic approach to intervene with the adverse consequences of a progressive CNS inflammation. © 2011 Elsevier Inc..


PubMed | North Carolina Research Campus
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Concise visualization is critical to present large amounts of information in a minimal space that can be interpreted quickly. Clinical applications in precision medicine present an important use case due to the time dependent nature of the interpretations, although visualization is increasingly necessary across the life sciences. In this paper we describe the Lollipops software for the presentation of panel or exome sequencing results. Source code and binaries are freely available at https://github.com/pbnjay/lollipops. Although other software and web resources exist to produce lollipop diagrams, these packages are less suited to clinical applications. The demands of precision medicine require the ability to easily fit into a workflow and incorporate external information without manual intervention.The Lollipops software provides a simple command line interface that only requires an official gene symbol and mutation list making it easily scriptable. External information is integrated using the publicly available Uniprot and Pfam resources. Heuristics are used to select the most informative components and condense them for a concise plot. The output is a flexible Scalable Vector Graphic (SVG) diagram that can be displayed in a web page or graphic illustration tool.The Lollipops software creates information-dense, publication-quality mutation plots for automated pipelines and high-throughput workflows in precision medicine. The automatic data integration enables clinical data security, and visualization heuristics concisely present knowledge with minimal user configuration.


PubMed | North Carolina Research Campus
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme | Year: 2011

In vitro and animal data suggest that quercetin affects adipogenesis and basal metabolism; however, whether this metabolic effect translates to reductions in body mass or improvement in body composition in humans is unknown. This study investigated 12-week supplementation of 2 different doses of quercetin, combined with vitamin C and niacin, on body mass and composition in a large, heterogeneous group of adults (n = 941; 60% female, 40% male; 18-85years of age; 45% normal body mass index, 30% overweight, 25% obese). Subjects were randomized into 3 groups, with supplements administered in double-blind fashion: Q500 = 500mg quercetinday(-1), Q1000 = 1000mg quercetinday(-1), and placebo. Quercetin supplements were consumed twice daily over a 12-week period, and pre- and poststudy body mass and composition measurements were taken in an overnight fasted state. A general linear model was used to predict change in body mass and composition across groups with adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors. Plasma quercetin increased in a dose-responsive manner in both Q500 and Q1000 groups relative to placebo. After adjustment for confounders, no significant differences in body mass (males interaction p value = 0.721, females p = 0.366) or body composition (males p = 0.650, females p = 0.639) were found between Q500 or Q1000 groups compared with placebo. No group differences in body mass or body composition were found in a subgroup of overweight and obese subjects. High-dose quercetin supplementation (500 and 1000mgday(-1)) for 12weeks in a large, heterogeneous group of adults did not affect body mass or composition.

Loading North Carolina Research Campus collaborators
Loading North Carolina Research Campus collaborators