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Thimister Clermont, Belgium
Thimister Clermont, Belgium
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News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.wineindustryadvisor.com

May 18, 2017—Benicia, CA—Cork Supply USA is pleased to announce that Drew Wolfe has joined their team as Strategic Accounts Consultant. He will be working with the company’s three sales divisions—Closures; Capsules; and Oak (Tonnellerie Ô barrels and Creative Oak alternatives)—to maximize cross-selling efforts. Drew brings a breadth of wine industry experience to his new role, having worked in vineyard operations as a Viticulturalist, and as a Wine and Spirits Sales Associate. Most recently he served as Production and Supply Manager at Cameron Hughes Wine, overseeing grape and bulk wine purchasing from multiple sources as well as dry goods procurement. Drew holds a BA in Environmental Sciences from Boston University and is a current MBA candidate at Sonoma State University. Please contact Drew at: dwolfe@tonnellerieo.com. Since its founding in 1981 by Jochen Michalski, the Cork Supply Group has been redefining quality through innovation, superior service, and expertise. The company is an ISO-certified producer of premium closure products for the global wine industry, including natural corks, CS and Cuvée technical corks and Talis bartops. In addition, the Group offers labels from the award-winning Studio Labels, as well as traditional handcrafted, custom-finished French and American oak barrels and Creative Oak alternatives from their state-of-the-art cooperage, Tonnellerie Ô. The Group serves as distributor for products from Nomacorc, Guala Closures, Sparflex and Rivercap, and operates their own production facilities in all corners of the globe, including Europe, Australia, South Africa, Argentina, China, and the United States, providing services to wineries in more than thirty countries. See more at: www.corksupplyusa.com


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.thedrinksbusiness.com

While the drinks business has reported extensively on the developments taking place in the cork stopper industry, there has been comparatively little recent news on technological advances being made by screwcap manufacturers – and Vinventions wants to change this. The company, which was formed in 2015 to unite five brands in every major closure category (listed, bottom), is focusing on enhancing the screwcap, acutely aware of this particular stopper’s weaknesses, and, no doubt, the chance to seize a competitive advantage. Dr. Heino Freudenberg, who is president & CEO of the business, told db earlier this year, “Screwcaps are a strongly growing category that offer convenience but they have drawbacks in terms of their carbon footprint and the demands of the supply chain: they are a pretty vulnerable product.” Continuing, he explained, “Screwcaps are easily dented, and if that happens, there is a high chance that the wine will oxidise, so you have to make sure that the supply chain is short. “Inseal closures are much more robust: while a screwcap has a very small area where the seal touches the top of the bottle – it is just a few square millimetres – an inseal closure is in contact with 4cm [of glass], so it is much, much more robust,” he added, before stating, “The screwcap is much more fragile, but if the supply chain is managed, then it’s a great product, which is why we have it.” To improve the performance of the screwcap, Freudenberg said that the industry could expect to see a new product from Vinventions towards the end of this year, which, he said, was designed to “make the screwcap a more exciting product,” while also addressing the drawbacks mentioned above. “We are looking at new raw materials for the screwcap, we are going to move away from aluminium because it has such a bad carbon footprint and it is so fragile in the supply chain,” he said. As previously reported by db, Nomacorc was the first closure manufacturer to release a comparative carbon footprint study when it published the results of a Greenloop audit in April 2008. Having analysed the CO2 released during the production of the raw material for all types of closure and their packaging, then the manufacture of the stoppers, and distribution, as well as disposal, it showed that cork had the lowest carbon footprint and screwcaps the highest. As for the oxidation of wines sealed with a screwcap due to the mechanical damage, Peter Gago, who is the chief winemaker at Penfolds, has previously told db that he has observed this problem on around 1% of his wines, which he said was the same percentage of his products that suffer from TCA spoilage due to cork. Freudenberg also told db that Vinventions were currently working on a number of developments for other types of wine closure, including the advancement of its glue-free agglomerated cork stoppers called Sübr (by Ohlinger); expanding the supply of its plant-based synthetic stoppers from Nomacorc, and furthering the quality of its “high-end” natural cork business. Regarding the latter point, he said that Vinventions offer a non-detectable TCA guarantee like Amorim and MA Silva, but added that Vinventions is now working on picking up whether a natural cork could transfer other “off notes besides TCA”, as well as reducing the potential for variable oxygen transfer rates in the stopper. “We are using technology that is similar to x-ray to look at every cork for TCA, other off-notes and the structural pattern to estimate the oxygen transfer,” he recorded. Concluding, he said, “This will make it [natural whole cork] a truly reliable and consistent product.” PENFOLDS TO UP FOCUS ON GLASS CLOSURES


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

On August 9th, the Honig family will gather restaurants, vintners, athletes, officials and celebrities for a cause close to their hearts. ​​​​​This August, Stephanie and Michael Honig, of Napa Valley’s Honig Vineyard and Winery will host a unique party on their property in Rutherford, California to raise money for a non-profit diabetes organization called Beyond Type 1.  The party at Honig is just one stop on an epic, 10-week adventure for Team Bike Beyond, a cycling team comprised of 20 international riders living with Type 1 diabetes. As they pedal their way from New York City to San Francisco, they will spread the word about Type 1 while showing the world what it means to live Beyond Type 1. Musician Nick Jonas, Juliet de Baubigny, Sarah Lucas and Sam Talbot founded Beyond Type 1 in 2015. 100% of every dollar raised directly supports the most promising global efforts and programs working to educate, advocate and cure Type 1 diabetes. Type 1, which affects more than 420 million people globally (source Beyond Type 1 website), is an autoimmune disease that can happen to anyone, can present at any age, and is not related to diet or lifestyle. The Honig’s oldest daughter, Sophia, who recently turned 10, was diagnosed with Type 1 at the age of 5, changing the family dynamic forever.  "No parent should ever be told that their child has a life threatening, incurable disease.  We will continue to do everything in our power until a cure is found". says Stephanie Honig The Napa Valley community is rallying to support the Honig’s efforts.  "Type 1 diabetes can be a devastating, even life-threatening diagnosis for kids. We should do everything we can to find a cure. The Honigs have been tireless advocates for Sophia and the millions of other children and families living with Type 1 diabetes. Their efforts are more important than ever as federal funding for medical research comes under attack. I am truly proud to work with them and everyone at Beyond Type 1 as we keep pushing for a cure." says Congressman Mike Thompson.  Sponsors of this event include Darioush, Trinchero Family Estates, Breakthrough Beverage Group, Chuck Wagner from Caymus Family Wines, David Drucker from Empire Merchants, St Helena Hospital, The Rudd Foundation, American AgCredit, Jelly Belly Candy Company, Jamie Kurtzig and Family, Nomacorc/Vinventions.  On the afternoon of the event, the Napa County sheriff department, along with county officials, will escort and welcome the 20 bike riders into Napa County. There are 11 restaurants hosting food stations: Brasswood; Brix Restaurant; Charlie Palmer; The Cliff Family’s Bruschetteria; Crisp Kitchen and Juice; Elaine Bell Catering; Heritage Eats; Model Bakery; Mustards; Oakville Grocery; and Prabh Indian Kitchen. Wine will be provided by Honig Vineyard and Winery, Beran, Dutch Henry, Jordan, Luna, St. Supery and Vineyard 29, with cocktails from Charbay. Music for the event will be provided by Groovetronix Productions.  Classic Party Rentals is donating all of the party equipment, furnishing and supplies.  This is one more example of the Napa Valley community coming together to support the greater good and one of their own. For more information about the event please contact stephanie@honigwine.com or visit https://beyondtype1.org/event/bike-beyond-party-napa-valley-california/.


Rodriguez-Mendez M.L.,University of Valladolid | Apetrei C.,University of Valladolid | Apetrei C.,University of Galati | Gay M.,University of Valladolid | And 7 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

An electronic panel formed by an electronic nose and an electronic tongue has been used to analyse red wines showing high and low phenolic contents, obtained by flash release and traditional soaking, respectively, and processed with or without micro-oxygenation. Four oxygen transfer rate conditions (0.8, 1.9, 8.0, and 11.9 μl oxygen/bottle/day) were ensured by using synthetic closures with controlled oxygen permeability and storage under controlled atmosphere. Twenty-five chemical parameters associated with the polyphenolic composition, the colour indices and the levels of oxygen were measured in triplicate and correlated with the signals registered (seven replicas) by means of the electronic nose and the electronic tongue using partial least squares regression analysis. The electronic nose and the electronic tongue showed particularly good correlations with those parameters associated with the oxygen levels and, in particular, with the influence of the porosity of the closure to oxygen exposure. In turn, the electronic tongue was particularly sensitive to redox species including oxygen and phenolic compounds. It has been demonstrated that a combined system formed from the electronic nose and the electronic tongue provides information about the chemical composition of both the gas and the liquid phase of red wines. This complementary information improves the capacity to predict values of oxygen-related parameters, phenolic content and colour parameters. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Prieto N.,University of Valladolid | Gay M.,University of Valladolid | Vidal S.,Nomacorc | Aagaard O.,Nomacorc | And 2 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

An electronic panel formed by an electronic nose, an electronic tongue and an electronic eye has been successfully used to evaluate the organoleptic characteristics of red wines vinified using different extraction techniques and micro-oxygenation methods and bottled using closures of different oxygen transmission rates (OTR). The three systems have demonstrated a good capability of discrimination by means of Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) has permitted to establish prediction models based on the type of closure, the polyphenol content or the effect of micro-oxygenation. The best correlations found using the e-eye and the e-nose are related to the OTR of the closure. In contrast, the electronic tongue is more sensitive to the polyphenol content. The discrimination and prediction capabilities of the system are significantly improved when signals from each module are combined. The electronic panel can be a useful tool for the characterisation and control of oxygen and antioxidant capability of red wines. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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