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Johnson D.M.,Noble Denton
Global Congress on Process Safety 2012 - Topical Conference at the 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety | Year: 2012

At approximately 6:10pm on 29th October 2009, a leak of gasoline occurred on the Indian Oil Corporation's (IOC) Petroleum Oil Lubricants Terminal at Jaipur, India. This leak continued for some 75 minutes, when a severe vapor cloud explosion (VCE) occurred, followed by major fires. The sequence of events and cause of the spillage were investigated by an independent Indian committee, however a separate investigation of the evidence specifically related to the VCE has been conducted. This evidence is discussed and compared with that observed following a VCE at the Buncefield oil terminal in the UK in December, 2005 with particular reference to deflagration to detonation transition as this provides the most likely explanation of the Buncefield VCE. The combination of the evidence from the two incidents, supported by information from a small number of other incidents, provides both an indication of the VCE potential for dense vapor clouds and the nature of key forensic evidence that is likely to be observed following such events. Source


Lowesmith B.J.,Loughborough University | Hankinson G.,Loughborough University | Johnson D.M.,Noble Denton
Process Safety and Environmental Protection | Year: 2011

A series of large scale vapour cloud explosions in a long congested region were conducted using methane/hydrogen mixtures. The congested region measured 3 m × 3 m × 18 m long and was preceded by a confined region which allowed an explosion flame with some initial flame speed and turbulence to be generated which then entered the congested region. During the experiments the flame speed and explosion overpressure were measured through the congested region. The hydrogen content in the methane/hydrogen mixture was varied from 0 to 50% by volume. A key objective was to determine factors that could lead to continued flame acceleration through the congested region, such as the hydrogen concentration, the initial flame speed entering the congestion and the level of congestion. The results are reported together with some detailed observations of the complex nature of pressure traces produced by explosion events of this type. © 2011 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Byrne D.,Noble Denton
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Civil Engineering | Year: 2010

This paper looks at trends in ship dimensions for all major ship categories, using the underlying economic determinants to describe why the changes have occurred in the past and what might be expected in the future. The implications of the changes in the design and operation of ships on port infrastructure are discussed. Source


Johnson D.M.,Noble Denton
Institution of Chemical Engineers Symposium Series | Year: 2012

At approximately 6:10pm on 29th October 2009, a leak of gasoline occurred on the Indian Oil Corporation's (IOC) Petroleum Oil Lubricants Terminal at Jaipur, India. This leak continued for some 75 minutes, when the vapour cloud ignited, resulting in a severe vapour cloud explosion (VCE), eleven fatalities and many tank fires. The sequence of events and cause of the spillage were investigated by an independent Indian committee. However, the VCE in the Jaipur incident shared a number of characteristics with the VCE at the Buncefield terminal in the UK in December 2005. Given these similarities, evidence related to the Jaipur VCE was collected by the author over a three day period at the site during February 2010, at which time much of the evidence on the site was relatively undisturbed. The combination of the evidence from the two incidents, supported by information from a small number of previous incidents, provides both an indication of the VCE potential for dense vapour clouds and the nature of key forensic evidence that is likely to be observed following such events. This evidence is summarised and comment provided on the implications for the assessment of explosion hazards on onshore sites. © 2012 IChemE. Source


Brown M.G.,Noble Denton
Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Offshore Europe Conference and Exhibition, OE 2013 | Year: 2013

This paper summarises 10 years of experience gained during the repair/renewal/life extension of several North Sea FPSO mooring systems. This includes reference to Phases 1 and 2 of GL Noble Denton's Mooring Integrity Joint Industry Project (JIP) plus recent North Sea mooring system repair and replacement operations. Issues encountered and typical mooring degradation mechanisms are reviewed making reference to the age of the components. The paper discusses how issues have been addressed in practice taking into account the risk of failure, offshore conditions and equipment availability. Brief descriptions are included of the various mooring intervention campaigns including actual offshore schedules, selected vessels, required additional equipment and ROV spreads. Positive and negative lessons learnt during the intervention campaigns are included. The importance of allowing sufficient time for planning and preparation of the intervention campaigns is stressed. Copyright 2013, Society of Petroleum Engineers. Source

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