Nobil Bio Ricerche

Portacomaro, Italy

Nobil Bio Ricerche

Portacomaro, Italy

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Kokkonen H.,University of Oulu | Verhoef R.,Wageningen University | Kauppinen K.,University of Oulu | Muhonen V.,University of Oulu | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A | Year: 2012

Pectins, complex plant-derived polysaccharides, are novel candidates for biomaterial nanocoatings. Pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I regions (RG-I) can be enzymatically treated to so-called modified hairy regions (MHR). We surveyed the growth and differentiation of murine preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells on Petri dishes coated with RG-Is from native or genetically engineered potato tubers. Uncoated tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and aminated (AMI) dishes served as controls. MHRPTR-GAL sample was depleted of galactose (9 mol % galactose; 23 mol % arabinose) and MHRPTR-ARA of arabinose (61 mol % galactose; 6 mol % arabinose). Wild-type (modified hairy region from potato pectin (MHRP)-WT) fragment contained default amounts (58 mol % galactose; 13 mol % arabinose) of both sugars. Focal adhesions (FAs) indicating cellular attachment were quantified. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin genes indicating osteoblastic differentiation was performed along with staining the produced calcium with tetracycline as an indicator of osteoblastic differentiation. Osteoblasts proliferated on all the samples to some extent. The control surfaces performed better than any of the pectin samples, of which the MHRP-WT seemed to function best. FA length was greater on MHRPTR-GAL than on other pectin samples, otherwise the mutants did not significantly deviate. RT-PCR results indicate that differences between the samples at the gene expression level might be even subtler. However, tetracycline-stained calcium-containing mineral was detected merely only on uncoated TCPS. These results indicate the possibility to affect bone cell growth with in vivo-modified pectin fragments, consecutively providing information on the significance of certain monosaccharides on the biocompatibility of these polysaccharides. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Simion M.,UOC Maxillofacial Surgery and Odontostomatology Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico | Kim D.M.,Harvard University | Pieroni S.,UOC Maxillofacial Surgery and Odontostomatology | Nevins M.,Harvard University | Cassinelli C.,Nobil Bio Ricerche
International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry | Year: 2016

This case report provided a unique opportunity to investigate the extent of microbiota infiltration on the oxidized implant surface that has been compromised by peri-implantitis. Scanning electron microscopic analysis confirmed the etiologic role of the bacteria on the loss of supporting structure and the difficulty in complete removal of bacterial infiltration on the implant surface. This case report emphasizes the need to perform definitive surface decontamination on failing dental implants prior to a regeneration procedure. © 2016 by Quintessence Publishing Co Inc.


Morra M.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Cassinelli C.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Bollati D.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Cascardo G.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Bellanda M.,Nobil Bio Ricerche
Journal of Oral Implantology | Year: 2015

Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherentendotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.


Morra M.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Cassinelli C.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Cascardo G.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Bollati D.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Baena R.R.Y.,University of Pavia
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A | Year: 2011

Microrough, doubly acid etched titanium surfaces (Ti) were further modified by amination and covalent coupling of fibrillar collagen type I (ColTi). Human Mesenchymal Cells (HMC) adhesion and growth, and relevant osteogenic differentiation in nonosteogenic (basal) medium were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and RT-PCR for a three-week period. Results show strongly enhanced HMC adhesion and cell density at short experimental time on ColTi, together with complete spreading of the cell body over the microrough surface topography. RT-PCR analysis of several genes involved in osteogenesis indicate, since the first week of culturing, significant progression of HMC on ColTi along the osteogenic pathway. These results indicate that the adopted process of surface immobilization of collagen, mandatory to impart collagenase resistance in implant sites, does not impair biospecific interactions between HMC and collagen. Thus, it is possible to upgrade properties arising from the control of Ti surfaces topography by surface-chemistry driven enhanced recruitment of precursor osteogenic cells and pro-osteogenic stimula. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Morra M.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Cassinelli C.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Cascardo G.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Bollati D.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Rodriguez Y Baena R.,University of Pavia
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A | Year: 2010

The goal of the study was the evaluation of the effect of biochemical surface modification by collagen on the bone response to acid-etched titanium surfaces. Fibrillar type I porcine collagen was adsorbed and covalently linked to acid-etched Ti disks and implants. Adhesion, growth, and specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells were evaluated. Implants in the femur and tibia of rabbit were performed for 2 and 4 weeks and relevant bone to implant contact (BIC) was evaluated by histomorphometry. Results show that cell morphology and growth are controlled by the rough acidetched implants topography. Specific metabolic activity (ALP) is significantly increased by the collagen overlayer. Importantly, surface modification by collagen increases the speed of periimplant bone formation, resulting in signifi-cantly higher BIC both in femur and tibia at 2 weeks. These results suggest that morphological (surface topography) and biochemical (surface linking of bioactive molecules) cues can cooperate and yield multifunctional implant surfaces. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Kokkonen H.,University of Oulu | Niiranen H.,University of Oulu | Schols H.A.,Wageningen University | Morra M.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A | Year: 2010

Multiform coated titanium implants are widely used in orthopedic and dental surgery. In this study, we have investigated the reactivity of pectin-coated titanium samples implanted under the latissimus dorsi - muscle fascia of rats. Samples were coated with two enzyme treated apple pectins; modified hairy regions (MHR-A and MHRB) that differed in chemical structure. Aminated (AMI) and uncoated titanium (Ti) served as controls. The thicknesses of the peri-implant fibrous tissue capsules formed 1 or 3 weeks after implantation were measured as indicative of possible inflammatory reactions toward the biomaterials. After 1 week, the MHR-B implant was surrounded by a thicker fibrous capsule (42.9 lm) than any of the other sample types: MHR-A (33.2 lm), AMI (32.5 lm), and Ti (32.3 lm), the last one being the only statistically significant difference. After 3 weeks, however, this difference disappeared; the capsule thicknesses around MHR-B and Ti implants had decreased to the values found for AMI and MHR-A. Additionally, the capsule formation represents merely a stromal rather than an inflammatory reaction, as indicated by the absence of activated macrophages or foreign body giant cells in the capsules. These results indicate for the first time the in vivo tolerability of covalently linked pectins, and suggest the feasibility of pectincoated bone and dental implants for clinical use. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Spriano S.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Ferraris S.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Bollati D.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | Morra M.,Nobil Bio Ricerche | And 2 more authors.
Applied Surface Science | Year: 2015

The purpose of this paper is to describe an innovative treatment for titanium dental implants, aimed at faster and more effective osteointegration. The treatment has been performed with the use of hydrogen peroxide, whose action was enhanced by concomitant exposure to a source of ultraviolet light. The developed surface oxide layer was characterized from the physical and chemical points of view. Moreover osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells were cultured on treated and control titanium surfaces and cell behavior investigated by scanning electron microscope observation and gene expression measurements. The described process produces, in only 6 min, a thin, homogeneous, not porous, free of cracks and bioactive (in vitro apatite precipitation) oxide layer. High cell density, peculiar morphology and overexpression of several genes involved with osteogenesis have been observed on modified surfaces. The proposed process significantly improves the biological response of titanium surfaces, and is an interesting solution for the improvement of bone integration of dental implants. A clinical application of the described surfaces, with a 5 years follow-up, is reported in the paper, as an example of the effectiveness of the proposed treatment. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Nobil Bio Ricerche
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A | Year: 2010

The goal of the study was the evaluation of the effect of biochemical surface modification by collagen on the bone response to acid-etched titanium surfaces. Fibrillar type I porcine collagen was adsorbed and covalently linked to acid-etched Ti disks and implants. Adhesion, growth, and specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells were evaluated. Implants in the femur and tibia of rabbit were performed for 2 and 4 weeks and relevant bone to implant contact (BIC) was evaluated by histomorphometry. Results show that cell morphology and growth are controlled by the rough acid-etched implants topography. Specific metabolic activity (ALP) is significantly increased by the collagen overlayer. Importantly, surface modification by collagen increases the speed of periimplant bone formation, resulting in significantly higher BIC both in femur and tibia at 2 weeks. These results suggest that morphological (surface topography) and biochemical (surface linking of bioactive molecules) cues can cooperate and yield multifunctional implant surfaces. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.


PubMed | Nobil Bio Ricerche
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of applied biomaterials & biomechanics : JABB | Year: 2010

This paper reviews recent advancements in the field of bioactive plant polysaccharides, and relevant implications forthe surface modification of medical devices. A number of complex plant polysaccharides exist, that display, for example, anti-inflammatoryactivity or specific effects on cultured mammalian cells. Advancements in the separation and purification of complex plant polysaccharides such as pectins, are paving the way for a conscious exploitation of some of these properties. Suitable immobilization methods and preliminary results on biological activity of surface-linked plant pectic polysaccharides are reviewed.


PubMed | Nobil Bio Ricerche
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of oral implantology | Year: 2015

Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the as-implanted condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

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