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Song Q.,CAS National Astronomical Observatories | Huang G.,CAS National Astronomical Observatories | Nakajima H.,Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2011

Solar microwave and hard X-ray spectral evolutions are co-analyzed in the 2000 June 10 and 2002 April 10 flares, and are simultaneously observed by the Owens-Valley Solar Array in the microwave band and by Yohkoh/Hard X-ray Telescope or RHESSI in the hard X-ray band, with multiple subpeaks in their light curves. The microwave and hard X-ray spectra are fitted by a power law in two frequency ranges of the optical thin part and two photon energy ranges, respectively. Similar to an earlier event in Shao & Huang, the well-known soft-hard-soft pattern of the lower energy range changed to the hard-soft-hard (HSH) pattern of the higher energy range during the spectral evolution of each subpeak in both hard X-ray flares. This energy dependence is actually supported by a positive correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower energy range, while it becomes an anti-correlation in the higher energy range. Regarding microwave data, the HSH pattern appears in the spectral evolution of each subpeak in the lower frequency range, which is somewhat similar to Huang & Nakajima. However, it returns back to the well-known pattern of soft-hard-harder for the overall spectral evolution in the higher frequency range of both events. This frequency dependence is confirmed by an anti-correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower frequency range, but it becomes a positive correlation in the higher frequency range. The possible mechanisms are discussed, respectively, for reasons why hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolutions have different patterns in different energy and frequency intervals. © 2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Source


Iwai K.,Tohoku University | Miyoshi Y.,Nagoya University | Masuda S.,Nagoya University | Shimojo M.,Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory | And 5 more authors.
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2012

The first coordinated observations of an active region using ground-based radio telescopes and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) satellites from different heliocentric longitudes were performed to study solar radio type-I noise storms. A type-I noise storm was observed between 100 and 300 MHz during a period from 2010 February 6 to 7. During this period the two STEREO satellites were located approximately 65° (ahead) and -70° (behind) from the Sun-Earth line, which is well suited to observe the earthward propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The radio flux of the type-I noise storm was enhanced after the preceding CME and began to decrease before the subsequent CME. This time variation of the type-I noise storm was directly related to the change of the particle acceleration processes around its source region. Potential-field source-surface extrapolation from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOHO/MDI) magnetograms suggested that there was a multipolar magnetic system around the active region from which the CMEs occurred around the magnetic neutral line of the system. From our observational results, we suggest that the type-I noise storm was activated at a side-lobe reconnection region that was formed after eruption of the preceding CME. This magnetic structure was deformed by a loop expansion that led to the subsequent CME, which then suppressed the radio burst emission. © 2012 The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Source


Kawate T.,Kwasan and Hida Observatory | Nishizuka N.,Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency | Oi A.,Ibaraki University | Ohyama M.,Shiga University | Nakajima H.,Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2012

We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission. © 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Source


Kupriyanova E.G.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Melnikov V.F.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Shibasaki K.,Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory
Solar Physics | Year: 2013

Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) with at least three simultaneously existing spectral components with periods P≥30 s, P≈20 s, and about P≈10 s were detected during the decay phase of a solar flare on 3 July 2002, observed with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). A detailed study of the spatial structure of the Fourier amplitudes of QPPs along a flaring loop has revealed different spatial distributions of the three components. It is shown that the source of the QPPs with period P≥30 s has its maximum amplitude in the inner region of the loop, between the footpoints. QPPs with period P≈20 s are localized at the periphery of the loop, mainly in the outer parts of the footpoints. The spatial distribution of oscillations with period about P≈10 s contains three regions of high QPP amplitudes: two near the footpoints and one in the middle of the flaring region. It is shown that the observed properties of the spectral components are most accurately described by the fundamental, second, and third harmonics of the kink mode standing waves. This is the first identification of the kink mode in flare loops which is based on strict limitations derived from data on the spatial structure of a pulsating flare region. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Source


Kupriyanova E.G.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Melnikov V.F.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Nakariakov V.M.,University of Warwick | Shibasaki K.,Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory
Solar Physics | Year: 2010

Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) of microwave emission generated in single flaring loops observed with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) and Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) are studied. Specific features of the time profiles, i.e. the visible presence or absence of QPPs, are not accounted for in the selection. The time evolution of the periods of the QPPs is examined using wavelet and correlation analyses. In ten out of twelve considered events, at least one or more significant spectral components with periods from 5-60 s have been found. The quality of the oscillations is rather low: Q=πN, where N is the number of cycles, mostly varies in the range 12 to 40, with an average of 25. We suggest that the detected QPPs can be classified into four types: i) those with stable mean periods (e.g. of 15-20 s or 8-9 s, the prevailing type); ii) those with spectral drift to shorter periods (mostly in the rise phase of the microwave emission); iii) those with drift to longer periods (mostly in the decay phase); iv) those with multiple periods showing an X-shaped drift (e.g. in the range from 20-40 s in the rise phase). © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source

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