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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Granicus, the largest provider of cloud software solutions to government, today announced that it has appointed Mark Hynes as its new Chief Executive Officer. Hynes joins Granicus after over two decades of leadership and experience driving growth and developing scalable organizational capabilities in a variety of executive roles, including President, COO, and co-founder across startup, midsize, and large technology organizations. Most recently, Hynes served as Chief Strategy and Development Officer of Altisource as well as President, Technology Products. During his time at Altisource, Hynes led one of the company’s three primary business segments, which focused on the commercialization and growth of mortgage and real estate software and advanced data analytics solutions. Altisource was named No. 20 and No. 26 in Fortune’s fastest growing global companies during Hynes’ tenure. Prior to Altisource, Hynes served as President of high-growth software company Digi-Net which developed advanced marketing automation and analytics software-as-a service solutions for B2C e-commerce companies. “Building on Granicus’s success as the market leader in government cloud software, I look forward to working with our customers and the newly combined Granicus team to help empower government agencies to provide better lives for the people they serve,” said Mark Hynes, CEO of Granicus. Hynes joins Granicus following its merger with GovDelivery, the leading provider of cloud-based communications software to government. In November of 2016, Granicus and GovDelivery announced the companies were merging to become the largest provider of cloud solutions to government in North America and in the United Kingdom. Together, they work with more than 3,000 government agencies at the local, state and federal levels to support their efforts to more effectively communicate, promote transparency, and transform the citizen experience. Moving forward, the combined organization will operate under the company name Granicus with three major product suites: GovDelivery Communication Cloud, Meeting and Agenda Suite, and Digital Services Suite. Further, to reflect the company’s new joint leadership and identity, Granicus unveiled a new website and brand identity representing its effort to empower government to improve decision making, achieve greater impact, and drive outcomes for the citizens they serve. Mark is succeeding Jason Fletcher, former CEO of Granicus, who will serve as Chief Operating Officer in the new combined entity, and Scott Burns, former CEO of GovDelivery, who will begin a new role as a Senior Advisor to the company. “We thank Scott and Jason for their common vision, commitment to empowering government agencies with innovative technologies, and leadership. We are excited to work with Mark to continue their success and building upon Granicus’s solutions for the public sector,” said Patrick Severson, Granicus Board Director and Principal at Vista Equity Partners. “Mark has a unique set of experiences and skills that will support Granicus’s continued growth and globalization while extending its track record of rapid innovation for government customers. We look forward to partnering with Mark and the entire Granicus leadership team.” The merger was majority backed by Vista Equity Partners, a leading investment firm focused on software, data, and technology-enabled businesses, which recently announced acquisitions of GovDelivery and Granicus. Previous Granicus majority shareholder K1 Investment Management continues to support the combined business as a minority shareholder. About Granicus Granicus provides technology that empowers government organizations to create better lives for the people they serve. By offering the industry’s leading cloud-based solutions for communications, meeting and agenda management, and digital services to over 3,000 public sector organizations, Granicus helps turn government missions into quantifiable realities. Granicus products connect over 150 million people, creating a powerful network to enhance citizen engagement. By optimizing decision-making processes, Granicus strives to help government see better outcomes and a greater impact for the citizens they serve. For more information on Granicus, visit http://www.granicus.com. About Vista Equity Partners Vista Equity Partners, a U.S.-based investment firm with offices in Austin, San Francisco, Chicago, and Oakland with more than $28 billion in cumulative capital commitments, currently invests in software, data and technology-based organizations led by world-class management teams with long-term perspective. Vista is a value-added investor, contributing professional expertise and multi-level support towards companies realizing their full potential. Vista’s investment approach is anchored by a sizable long-term capital base, experience in structuring technology-oriented transactions, and proven management techniques that yield flexibility and opportunity in private equity investing. For more information, please visit http://www.vistaequitypartners.com.


On 18 August 2016, Vestas initiated a share buy-back programme, ref. Company announcement No. 26/2016. The programme is implemented in accordance with Article 5 of Regulation No 596/2014 of the European Parliament and Council of 16 April 2014 (MAR) (the "Safe Harbour” rules). The purpose of the programme is to adjust Vestas’ capital structure and to meet the obligations arising from share based incentive programmes to employees of Vestas. Under the programme Vestas will buy back shares for an amount up to DKK 2,984 million (approximately EUR 400 million) in the period from 18 August 2016 to 30 December 2016. The following transactions have been made under the programme during the period 6-12 December 2016: Details of all the transactions relating to the share buy-back programme during the period are presented in the attached appendix.


On 18 August 2016, Vestas initiated a share buy-back programme, ref. Company announcement No. 26/2016. The programme is implemented in accordance with Article 5 of Regulation No 596/2014 of the European Parliament and Council of 16 April 2014 (MAR) (the "Safe Harbour” rules). The purpose of the programme is to adjust Vestas’ capital structure and to meet the obligations arising from share based incentive programmes to employees of Vestas. Under the programme Vestas will buy back shares for an amount up to DKK 2,984 million (approximately EUR 400 million) in the period from 18 August 2016 to 30 December 2016. The following transactions have been made under the programme during the period 13-19 December 2016: Details of all the transactions relating to the share buy-back programme during the period are presented in the attached appendix.


On 18 August 2016, Vestas initiated a share buy-back programme, ref. Company announcement No. 26/2016. The programme is implemented in accordance with Article 5 of Regulation No 596/2014 of the European Parliament and Council of 16 April 2014 (MAR) (the "Safe Harbour” rules). The purpose of the programme is to adjust Vestas’ capital structure and to meet the obligations arising from share based incentive programmes to employees of Vestas. Under the programme Vestas will buy back shares for an amount up to DKK 2,984 million (approximately EUR 400 million) in the period from 18 August 2016 to 30 December 2016. The following transactions have been made under the programme during the period 25-31 October 2016: Details of all the transactions relating to the share buy-back programme during the period are presented in the attached appendix.


On 18 August 2016, Vestas initiated a share buy-back programme, ref. Company announcement No. 26/2016. The programme is implemented in accordance with Article 5 of Regulation No 596/2014 of the European Parliament and Council of 16 April 2014 (MAR) (the "Safe Harbour” rules). The purpose of the programme is to adjust Vestas’ capital structure and to meet the obligations arising from share based incentive programmes to employees of Vestas. Under the programme Vestas will buy back shares for an amount up to DKK 2,984 million (approximately EUR 400 million) in the period from 18 August 2016 to 30 December 2016. The following transactions have been made under the programme during the period 22-28 November 2016: Details of all the transactions relating to the share buy-back programme during the period are presented in the attached appendix.


On 18 August 2016, Vestas initiated a share buy-back programme, ref. Company announcement No. 26/2016. The programme is implemented in accordance with Article 5 of Regulation No 596/2014 of the European Parliament and Council of 16 April 2014 (MAR) (the "Safe Harbour” rules). The purpose of the programme is to adjust Vestas’ capital structure and to meet the obligations arising from share based incentive programmes to employees of Vestas. Under the programme Vestas will buy back shares fo


On 18 August 2016, Vestas initiated a share buy-back programme, ref. Company announcement No. 26/2016. The programme is implemented in accordance with Article 5 of Regulation No 596/2014 of the European Parliament and Council of 16 April 2014 (MAR) (the "Safe Harbour” rules). The purpose of the programme is to adjust Vestas’ capital structure and to meet the obligations arising from share based incentive programmes to employees of Vestas. Under the programme Vestas will buy back shares for an amount up to DKK 2,984 million (approximately EUR 400 million) in the period from 18 August 2016 to 30 December 2016. The following transactions have been made under the programme during the period 8-14 November 2016: Details of all the transactions relating to the share buy-back programme during the period are presented in the attached appendix.


News Article | April 7, 2016
Site: techcrunch.com

Is Yik Yak a thing anymore? Not so much, according to download stats, traffic charts, surveys and a source that says the college app’s monthly user count has been declining. That source — with intimate knowledge of the company — also tipped me off that Yik Yak‘s original CTO Tom Chernetsky has bailed, which the startup now confirms. He’s not the only one who thinks the supposed rocket ship won’t fly as high as some expected when Sequoia led a mammoth $62 million at $400 million valuation in November 2014. Since late last year, Yik Yak’s VP of Product, Director of Engineering, Lead Product Designer and other senior employees have departed. However, the hometown CTO’s departure could have been catalyzed by the recruitment of seasoned Google Director of Engineering Michael Morrissey, funded by the Sequoia cash. Morrissey leads engineering at Yik Yak, and Chernetsky might not have enjoyed being in his shadow. But it’d be hard to leave an exec role at a startup if everything was up and up. It seems that the luster of posting anonymous gossip, jokes and bullying may be wearing off, as it did for Yik Yak’s dead cousin Secret. My source says Yik Yak has built a direct messaging feature that it’s preparing to release, but even jumping into the chat sphere might not be enough to revitalize the wounded animal. Months after Sequoia pumped a ton of cash into the Atlanta startup, download rates and traffic began to drop, according to App Annie and comScore charts dug up by GigaOm. Things have gotten worse since, as Google Play dropped it from its charts last March, likely due to hate speech in the app. This week, App Annie shows Yik Yak sank to No. 63 on the download charts amongst U.S. social networking apps and just No. 1067 amongst all U.S. iOS apps. That’s compared to No. 21 in social and No. 141 overall on April 3, 2014, No. 26 in social and No. 300 overall this date last year and a peak of No. 2 in social and No. 3 overall in September 2014. While comScore’s exact numbers aren’t always accurate, the directional trends are typically reliable. They show a decline starting in late 2014. Now comScore pegs Yik Yak at 1.76 million monthly mobile users over 18, essentially flat from 16 months ago. A small Tech Insider survey last month didn’t place Yik Yak in the top 15 apps amongst college students after once being the big startup on campus. These stats all mesh with what my source says, which is that Yik Yak has had zero significant growth in over a year, and consistently misses its growth targets. They cite 4 million monthly active users as the count in January, noting the number has declined since then, though I can’t confirm that exact number. The lack of more obvious growth is also worrisome considering Yik Yak has quietly begun pushing for international usage in English-speaking countries like Ireland and Australia. The startup initially tried to block overseas users until it was ready, according to this great history of the startup written by Business Insider’s Alyson Shontell. Naturally, Yik Yak PR defended the company, insisting that “growth and usage is very strong.” They claim the number of active colleges on the app is now at 2,000 and counting, and the company is hiring. But without more concrete metrics to counter publicly available data, it’s tough to drink that Kool-Aid. To become a powerful social network that can survive on ad revenue, Yik Yak would have to get a lot bigger. Right now it might only have one-third of the 12.2 million U.S. college students on board. But even turning them all into loyal Yakkers might not be enough to justify its valuation. The problem with anonymous apps is that over time they start to feel exhausting. The crude stories, played-out jokes stolen from Reddit and cringe-worthy bullying wear on people. While they might have a few juicy quips of their own to share, blowing off steam can eventually feel pointless. That’s why my Secret and Yik Yak usage dried up. Yik Yak’s product has continued to plod along, despite some colleges’ attempts to ban the app for facilitating cyberbullying. But nothing has made it feel fresh again. Yik Yak began allowing photos but no faces last July, and launched a web client in January. Then, in a move that seemed to confuse some users into thinking Yik Yak was no longer anonymous, it opened the option to post from a handle/screen name rather than having always have no identification attached to a post. That last feature unlocks what could be a make-or-break feature for Yik Yak — chat. According to my source, Yik Yak plans to open private messaging between handles, so if someone says they’re lonely, kids could try to cheer them up (or shamelessly hit on them). Or if they think someone has been through a similar situation they could celebrate or commiserate with them. Chat has proven to make apps stickier and Yik Yak could use the retention, judging by the charts. The startup will have to find some way to break out big time beyond the U.S. college market, despite refusing to allow high-schoolers in to prevent more bullying. Luckily since the startup is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, its employees are less likely to get poached by other tech companies than they would be in Silicon Valley. But maintaining morale must be tough. All college kids seem to talk about these days is Snapchat and Instagram, when a few years ago it was Yik Yak on the tips of their fingers.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

(Reuters) - It is in Kuala Lumpur's "Little India" neighborhood, behind an unmarked door on the second floor of a rundown building, where a military equipment company called Glocom says it has its office. Glocom is a front company run by North Korean intelligence agents that sells battlefield radio equipment in violation of United Nations sanctions, according to a United Nations report drafted for the Security Council seen by Reuters. Reuters found that Glocom advertises over 30 radio systems for "military and paramilitary" organizations on its Malaysian website, glocom.com.my. Glocom’s website, which was taken down late last year, listed the Little India address in its contacts section. No one answers the door there and the mailbox outside is stuffed with unopened letters. In fact, no company by that name exists in Malaysia. But two Malaysian companies controlled by North Korean shareholders and directors registered Glocom's website in 2009, according to website and company registration documents. And it does have a business, the draft U.N. report says. Last July, an air shipment of North Korean military communications equipment, sent from China and bound for Eritrea, was intercepted in an unnamed country. The seized equipment included 45 boxes of battlefield radios and accessories labeled "Glocom", short for Global Communications Co. Glocom is controlled by the Reconnaissance General Bureau, the North Korean intelligence agency tasked with overseas operations and weapons procurement, the report says, citing undisclosed information it obtained. A spokesman for North Korea's mission at the U.N. told Reuters he had no information about Glocom. U.N. resolution 1874, adopted in 2009, expanded the arms embargo against North Korea to include military equipment and all "related materiel". But implementation of the sanctions "remains insufficient and highly inconsistent" among member countries, the U.N. report says, and North Korea is using "evasion techniques that are increasing in scale, scope and sophistication.” Malaysia is one of the few countries in the world which had strong ties with North Korea. Their citizens can travel to each other’s countries without visas. But those ties have begun to sour after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s estranged half-brother was murdered at Kuala Lumpur’s international airport on Feb 13. According to the "WHOIS" database, which discloses website ownership, Glocom.com.my was registered in 2009 by an entity called International Global System using the "Little India" address. A similarly named company, International Golden Services is listed as the contact point on Glocom's website. Glocom is operated by the Pyongyang branch of a Singapore-based company called Pan Systems, the draft U.N. report says, citing an invoice and other information it obtained. Louis Low, managing director of Pan Systems in Singapore said his company used to have an office in Pyongyang from 1996 but officially ended relations with North Korea in 2010 and was no longer in control of any business there. "They use (the) Pan Systems (name) and say it's a foreign company, but they operate everything by themselves," Low told Reuters referring to the North Koreans at the Pyongyang office. Pan Systems Pyongyang utilized bank accounts, front companies and agents mostly based in China and Malaysia to buy components and sell completed radio systems, the U.N. report says. Pan Systems Pyongyang could not be reached for comment. One of the directors of Pan Systems Pyongyang is Ryang Su Nyo. According to a source with direct knowledge of her background, Ryang reports to "Liaison Office 519”, a department in the Reconnaissance General Bureau. Ryang is also listed as a shareholder of International Global System, the company that registered Glocom's website. Reuters has not been able to contact Ryang. Ryang frequently traveled to Singapore and Malaysia to meet with Pan Systems representatives, the draft U.N. report says. On one such trip in February 2014, she and two other North Koreans were detained in Malaysia for attempting to smuggle $450,000 through customs at Kuala Lumpur's budget airport terminal, two sources with direct knowledge of the situation told Reuters. The North Korean trio told Malaysian authorities they all worked for Pan Systems and the cash belonged to the North Korean embassy in Kuala Lumpur, according to the two sources. The Malaysian Attorney General decided not to press charges because of insufficient evidence. A week later, the trio was allowed to travel, and the North Korean embassy claimed the cash, the sources said. All three had passports assigned to government officials, the sources said. Malaysia's Customs Department and the Attorney General's office did not respond to requests for comment over the weekend. The Pan Systems representative in Kuala Lumpur is a North Korean by the name of Kim Chang Hyok, the U.N. report says. Kim, who also goes by James Kim, was a founding director of International Golden Services, the company listed in the contacts section of the Glocom website. Kim is director and shareholder of four other companies in Malaysia operating in the fields of IT and trade, according to the Malaysian company registry. He did not respond to requests for comment by mail or email. The United Nations panel, which prepared the draft report, asked the Malaysian government if it would expel Kim and freeze the assets of International Golden Services and International Global System to comply with U.N. sanctions. The U.N. did not say when it made the request. "The panel has yet to receive an answer," the report said. Reuters has not received a response from the Malaysian government to repeated requests for comment about Glocom. One of Glocom's early partners in Malaysia was Mustapha Ya'akub, a prominent member of Malaysia's ruling United Malays National Organisation (UMNO). Since 2014, he has been listed as a director of International Golden Services As secretary of the UMNO youth wing's international affairs bureau, Mustapha fostered political connections in the 1990s with countries, such as Iran, Libya and North Korea. Glocom's Little India address once housed a company owned by UMNO Youth. Mustapha, 67, said he had been a Glocom business partner "many years back" and said it has been continuously controlled by several North Koreans, including Kim Chang Hyok, whom he said he knew. He did not divulge his role in the company, and denied any knowledge of Glocom’s current business. "We thought at the time it might be a good idea to go into business together," Mustapha told Reuters about his first meeting with his North Korean business contacts. He did not say who those contacts were or what they discussed. He denied any knowledge of Glocom's current business. Glocom advertises and exhibits its wares without disclosing its North Korean connections. "Anywhere, Anytime in Battlefield," reads the slogan on one of several 2014 Glocom catalogs obtained by Reuters.  An advertisement in the September 2012 edition of the Asian Military Review said Glocom develops radios and equipment for "military and paramilitary organisations".  A spokesman for the magazine confirmed the ad had been bought by Glocom, but said the magazine was unaware of its alleged links to North Korea.  Glocom has exhibited at least three times since 2006 at Malaysia's biennial arms show, Defence Services Asia (DSA), according to Glocom's website. At DSA 2016, Glocom paid 2,000 ringgit ($450) to share a table in the booth of Malaysia's Integrated Securities Corporation, its director Hassan Masri told Reuters by email. Hassan said he had nothing to do with Glocom's equipment and was unaware of its alleged links to North Korea. Aside from the North Koreans behind Glocom, clues on its website also point to its North Korean origins. For instance, one undated photo shows a factory worker testing a Glocom radio system. A plaque nearby shows he has won a uniquely North Korean award: The Model Machine No. 26 Prize," named in honor of late leader Kim Jong Il, who is said to have efficiently operated "Lathe No. 26" at the Pyongyang Textile Factory when he was a student. For a Graphic on Murder at the airport, click: http://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/rngs/NORTHKOREA-MALAYSIA-KIM/010031Z94H5/index.html For a Graphic on Glocom's connections to North Korea, click: http://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/rngs/NORTHKOREA-MALAYSIA-ARMS/010031ZK4HW/NORTHKOREA-MALAYSIA-ARMS.jpg


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

(Reuters) - It is in Kuala Lumpur's "Little India" neighborhood, behind an unmarked door on the second floor of a rundown building, where a military equipment company called Glocom says it has its office. Glocom is a front company run by North Korean intelligence agents that sells battlefield radio equipment in violation of United Nations sanctions, according to a United Nations report submitted to the Security Council seen by Reuters. Reuters found that Glocom advertises over 30 radio systems for "military and paramilitary" organizations on its Malaysian website, glocom.com.my. Glocom's Malaysian website, which was taken down late last year, listed the Little India address in its contacts section. No one answers the door there and the mailbox outside is stuffed with unopened letters. In fact, no company by that name exists in Malaysia. But two Malaysian companies controlled by North Korean shareholders and directors registered Glocom's website in 2009, according to website and company registration documents. And it does have a business, the unreleased U.N. report says. Last July, an air shipment of North Korean military communications equipment, sent from China and bound for Eritrea, was intercepted in an unnamed country. The seized equipment included 45 boxes of battlefield radios and accessories labeled "Glocom", short for Global Communications Co. Glocom is controlled by the Reconnaissance General Bureau, the North Korean intelligence agency tasked with overseas operations and weapons procurement, the report says, citing undisclosed information it obtained. A spokesman for North Korea's mission at the U.N. told Reuters he had no information about Glocom. U.N. resolution 1874, adopted in 2009, expanded the arms embargo against North Korea to include military equipment and all "related materiel". But implementation of the sanctions "remains insufficient and highly inconsistent" among member countries, the U.N. report says, and North Korea is using "evasion techniques that are increasing in scale, scope and sophistication.” Malaysia is one of the few countries in the world which had strong ties with North Korea. Their citizens can travel to each other’s countries without visas. But those ties have begun to sour after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s estranged half-brother was murdered at Kuala Lumpur’s international airport on Feb 13. According to the "WHOIS" database, which discloses website ownership, Glocom.com.my was registered in 2009 by an entity called International Global System using the "Little India" address. A similarly named company, International Golden Services is listed as the contact point on Glocom's website. Glocom registered a new website, glocom-corp.com, in mid-December, this one showing no Malaysian contacts. Its most recent post is dated January, 2017 and advertises new products, including a remote control system for a precision-guided missile. Glocom is operated by the Pyongyang branch of a Singapore-based company called Pan Systems, the U.N. report says, citing an invoice and other information it obtained. Louis Low, managing director of Pan Systems in Singapore said his company used to have an office in Pyongyang from 1996 but officially ended relations with North Korea in 2010 and was no longer in control of any business there. "They use (the) Pan Systems (name) and say it's a foreign company, but they operate everything by themselves," Low told Reuters referring to the North Koreans at the Pyongyang office. Pan Systems Pyongyang utilized bank accounts, front companies and agents mostly based in China and Malaysia to buy components and sell completed radio systems, the U.N. report says. Pan Systems Pyongyang could not be reached for comment. One of the directors of Pan Systems Pyongyang is Ryang Su Nyo. According to a source with direct knowledge of her background, Ryang reports to "Liaison Office 519”, a department in the Reconnaissance General Bureau. Ryang is also listed as a shareholder of International Global System, the company that registered Glocom's website. Reuters has not been able to contact Ryang. Ryang frequently traveled to Singapore and Malaysia to meet with Pan Systems representatives, the U.N. report says. On one such trip in February 2014, she and two other North Koreans were detained in Malaysia for attempting to smuggle $450,000 through customs at Kuala Lumpur's budget airport terminal, two sources with direct knowledge of the situation told Reuters. The North Korean trio told Malaysian authorities they all worked for Pan Systems and the cash belonged to the North Korean embassy in Kuala Lumpur, according to the two sources. The Malaysian Attorney General decided not to press charges because of insufficient evidence. A week later, the trio was allowed to travel, and the North Korean embassy claimed the cash, the sources said. All three had passports assigned to government officials, the sources said. Malaysia's Customs Department and the Attorney General's office did not respond to requests for comment over the weekend. The Pan Systems representative in Kuala Lumpur is a North Korean by the name of Kim Chang Hyok, the U.N. report says. Kim, who also goes by James Kim, was a founding director of International Golden Services, the company listed in the contacts section of the Glocom website. Kim is director and shareholder of four other companies in Malaysia operating in the fields of IT and trade, according to the Malaysian company registry. He did not respond to requests for comment by mail or email. The United Nations panel, which prepared the draft report, asked the Malaysian government if it would expel Kim and freeze the assets of International Golden Services and International Global System to comply with U.N. sanctions. The U.N. did not say when it made the request. "The panel has yet to receive an answer," the report said.  Reuters has not received a response from the Malaysian government to repeated requests for comment about Glocom. One of Glocom's early partners in Malaysia was Mustapha Ya'akub, a prominent member of Malaysia's ruling United Malays National Organisation (UMNO). Since 2014, he has been listed as a director of International Golden Services As secretary of the UMNO youth wing's international affairs bureau, Mustapha fostered political connections in the 1990s with countries, such as Iran, Libya and North Korea. Glocom's Little India address once housed a company owned by UMNO Youth. Mustapha, 67, said he had been a Glocom business partner "many years back" and said it has been continuously controlled by several North Koreans, including Kim Chang Hyok, whom he said he knew. He did not divulge his role in the company, and denied any knowledge of Glocom’s current business. "We thought at the time it might be a good idea to go into business together," Mustapha told Reuters about his first meeting with his North Korean business contacts. He did not say who those contacts were or what they discussed. He denied any knowledge of Glocom's current business.     Glocom advertises and exhibits its wares without disclosing its North Korean connections. "Anywhere, Anytime in Battlefield," reads the slogan on one of several 2017 Glocom catalogs obtained by Reuters.      An advertisement in the September 2012 edition of the Asian Military Review said Glocom develops radios and equipment for "military and paramilitary organizations".      A spokesman for the magazine confirmed the ad had been bought by Glocom, but said the magazine was unaware of its alleged links to North Korea.  Glocom has exhibited at least three times since 2006 at Malaysia's biennial arms show, Defence Services Asia (DSA), according to Glocom's website. At DSA 2016, Glocom paid 2,000 ringgit ($450) to share a table in the booth of Malaysia's Integrated Securities Corporation, its director Hassan Masri told Reuters by email. Hassan said he had nothing to do with Glocom's equipment and was unaware of its alleged links to North Korea. Aside from the North Koreans behind Glocom, clues on its website also point to its North Korean origins. For instance, one undated photo shows a factory worker testing a Glocom radio system. A plaque nearby shows the machine he is using has won a uniquely North Korean award: The Model Machine No. 26 Prize," named in honor of late leader Kim Jong Il, who is said to have efficiently operated "Lathe No. 26" at the Pyongyang Textile Factory when he was a student.

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