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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dennis Joslin, Ph.D., will retire from his position as president and CEO of Nebraska Methodist College effective July 31, 2017. Dr. Joslin has served Nebraska Methodist College for the past 41 years after beginning his career in healthcare as a critical care staff nurse. Joslin then moved into teaching as a faculty member at Methodist School of Nursing. Prior to becoming president and CEO he held many positions within the college including executive vice president, vice president of academic affairs, dean of academic affairs and director of curriculum. Dr. Joslin earned his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Iowa, his Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Nebraska Medical Center and his Ph.D. in Higher Education Leadership from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Throughout his career, Joslin has promoted the expansion of roles and education for nursing and allied health professionals. As one of the first men to enter nursing in the 1970’s, Joslin saw the need for an expanding number of male nurses. The promotion of nursing as a profession for men is something that Joslin continues to support through his participation as a charter member in the Nebraska Chapter of the American Association for Men in Nursing. Under Joslin’s executive stewardship, the college experienced substantial transformation which included the first capital campaign for the college, the design, construction and opening of a state-of-the-art campus, annual record enrollments for each of the past 15 years (resulting in nearly tripling enrollment to 1,100 students), the launching of degree offerings at the doctoral level and the expansion of offerings at the master’s, bachelor’s and associate’s degree levels as well as several certificate level offerings. To ensure that the college’s mission of “promoting the health and well-being of the community” is realized, the college has developed numerous partnerships throughout the community to extend the reach of NMC students, faculty and staff. “The growth we’ve established, along with our consistently high job placement rates, lend credence to the idea that we are a premier school in the Omaha area for a healthcare education,” said Dr. Joslin. Deb Carlson, Ph.D., executive vice president, will assume the position of president and CEO on Aug. 1, 2017. The Nebraska Methodist College Board of Directors unanimously selected her to succeed Joslin as the next president. Carlson has been with NMC for 14 years and has served as a faculty member in the Arts and Sciences division, president of the Faculty Senate, director of the Office of Institutional Research, vice president of operations and, for the past three years, executive vice president. “Dr. Carlson is an outstanding educator and administrator who brings over 20 years of higher education experience from the University of Nebraska and Wayne State College,” said Joslin of his successor. “As a cognitive psychologist, she really understands people and excels in organizational development, strategic planning and accreditation. Deb is committed to serving the community with a focus on community-based healthcare, a direct reflection of the mission of the college.” The Omaha, Nebraska-based Nebraska Methodist College – the Josie Harper Campus has been teaching the meaning of care for 125 years and counting. An affiliate of Methodist Health System, NMC offers certificate, associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees both on campus and online. Nebraska Methodist College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.


I’ve apparently been collected extra stories to share for a few weeks. Scroll on down if you want some more EV and clean transport reading. To kick things off, here’s one looking forward to the new year: 11–13 Electric Cars To Light Up The Market In 2016 Between the electric car models that are just arriving on the US market and the ones that will likely hit the market by the end of 2016, we have an exciting year ahead. Below are 11 electric cars that I think will light up 2016 (or 13 if you count cars in a particular way). The Tesla Model X SUV will begin hitting the company’s showrooms throughout the US towards the beginning of January, according to some recent reports. Mark Templeton Shares His Thoughts On The Model X (After Owning It For A Few Months) The CEO of Citrix Systems, Mark Templeton, was one of the lucky ones to have taken delivery of his Tesla Model X SUV at the Model X launch event at the end of September — more than 2 months ago, as of the time of writing this. Tesla Model S (and Model X, I suppose) owners throughout Europe, Australia, and Hong Kong, will be given access to Spotify Premium following a new firmware update, according to recent reports. Tesla HQ Running Out of Room for Employee Parking Success brings its own set of new problems to be solved. There are so many people working at Tesla headquarters these days that the company has set up a valet parking service, according to Business Insider. Tesla currently has 14,000 total employees with 1,600 open positions to fill, and over the next 4 years, Tesla plans to add another 4,500 new employees just in California alone. As indicated, it’s a wiki for FAQ regarding the Tesla Model X. This excellent resource deserves it’s own thread. Although it obviously suffers from the same selection bias as any other nonrandom voluntary data set, the numbers are substantial enough to provide real information. Anyone who has reserved a MX is encouraged to register, then update their information through the order and delivery process. Although the Tesla Model X all-electric SUV was first unveiled in prototype form way back in February 2012, and limited customer deliveries began in September of this year, the car is still shrouded in mystery. With somewhere between 20,000 and 30,000 pre-orders for the vehicle, the Model X is arguably the most highly anticipated SUV of the decade. And yet you still can’t go to the Tesla web site to find out pricing details or a comprehensive description of the various options and configurations that are available. I’m new to the forum (but long time lurker). Doing a random search on Google I find this document that I think was never mentioned: https://www.teslamotors.com/sites/de…onse_Guide.pdf It contains lot’s of new informations (to me at least ) In Light of Model X Options, Did the Shareholder “Vegan Uprising” Succeed? While browsing YouTube for elusive new Model X videos, I got this “recommended” video, hilariously titled: “Elon Musk faces the Vegan Uprising at Tesla shareholder meeting (6.9.15).” Is There Really a Difference? 2015 vs 2013 Took delivery of my 2015 P90D last week. Love the car, but also loved my 2013. Aside from the performance, is there really a difference worth the upgrade? It’s a decision I struggled with for 8 months before finally pulling the trigger. The auto pilot software was what finally put me over the edge. Beyond that and Next Gen seats, can’t say there’s really much of a difference. I got the same joy out of my 2013 as I do the 2015. The 2015 allows me to show off its muscle to friends. Is that worth another $33,000?? That’s for each individual to decide. The next gen seats are certainly nicer, but not quite as big of a difference as I expected. The Auto Pilot feature so far has done more of scaring the crap out of me than it has been a useful tool. Jury is still out on that one. Assuming it will get better with time. Overall, absolutely love my new car, but at the same time, I loved my 2013 too. We’ve had our S85 for about 2.5 years and have loved every minute of it. My wife is not a car person at all, but with the Tesla it’s a different story. We live in New England and the while the rear wheel drive isn’t bad in the snow, we shy away from taking it to the mountains and on occasion we find ourselves having to dig a path through the snow to get up our driveway. So, this weekend we decided to take a look at the 70D and take it for a spin. I had not driven any AWD version yet, nor had I experienced AP. AWD is a different experience… less of a push feel and more of a launch feel… if that makes sense. And, the AP and additional safety features were very cool and helped with selling the idea of trading to the wife. I’ve owned Porsches, plenty of BMWs and my new Tesla replaced my Merc SLK… I cannot get rid of the Tesla grin… I am incapable of putting words to describe my feeling, just incredible. SpaceX’s immaculate reception last night gives Tesla Motors (and Tesla Energy) a brand boost that Big Auto would love to have, but never will. They’ve tried for decades to associate their cars with rockets and aircraft, especially during the space-happy 1950s and 60s. Space-age design, space-age materials, jet-inspired fins, turbine taillights, cockpit ergonomics. Well, now we have a car company that actually does share engineering DNA with flying things, since the CEO is a real-life rocketeer who is taking us where no man has gone before. The 500k number comes from Tesla’s ability to produce cars given the restraints of the NUMMI factory and Gigafactory 1 at fully operational. But what if after the March reveal, preorders exceed expectations? What if preorders hit 500k in a few months? Or even higher? Once the Model 3 goes into production, it would take years to clear the backlog. Would Tesla really stand idly by? 30 Reasons Why Tesla Model S is Such a Great Car My friend asked me yesterday “Why have your ordered Tesla?”. Well, I didn’t have much time, so I said “Because it’s best car in the world.” And since he knew nothing on how true my statement was, I did this short list of major reasons why it is so and emailed it to him. Let me know if you think I’ve missed some that should be in top 30. On New Year’s Day, a Tesla Model S in Norway caught fire while charging and was totally destroyed. There is no known cause for the incident but Tesla is investigating and promises a full report soon. I Upgraded to Ludicrous and got Launch Mode!!! Is it worth it? Here is my review. This last thursday I picked up my newly retrofitted P85DL which also came with the new software upgrade offering “Launch Mode.” First off to help put some context to my opinion towards the “is it worth it” debate, I was looking at this decision from a mostly impractical view. A.) the performance it gets you is way cheaper than what you’d have to pay to make any ice to improve it that much, B.) it gets my P85D back up to the king of the hill status and C.) I have always wanted a sub 3 second 0-60 car and a sub 11 second quarter mile car and I am done with ICE so here we are. Cruising down the Florida Turnpike on cruise control is probably what the “beta” version of our software was programed for? I drove 3+ hours and the software made almost no mistakes with the exception of wanting to “exit out” a few times driving in the right lane. The car steered to follow the right lane indicator and wanted to exit out to the right. I have now learned to “guide the car” through exit areas and the autopilot is getting more adaptive. Nevertheless, the car basically drove itself for 220 miles, and in my book, this is very impressive. Why I Think Tesla is Unlikely to Fail Speculation and predictions of Tesla’s demise are rampant. Some people here as well as a number of “experts” in the auto media believe that the mainstream car makers are on the verge of killing Tesla with their own BEV. Tesla may still fail, their success is not guaranteed, but I don’t believe any failure will be for the reasons the experts believe. What Will The TSLA Share Price Be At Closing December 30th 2016? I think we have a very exciting year ahead of us, due to many reasons: And I think TSLA will do very well this year as a result. I would be surprised if we don’t see the share price go over 300 this year, so I’m betting on 318.27 USD per share at closing on Friday the 30th of December. Happy New Year everyone! A 2016 Chevrolet Volt driven by Wayne Gerdes in Southern California returned 111.9 miles on a single charge and he said under ideal circumstances 125 miles is possible. Saab, the former Swedish car maker, is now NEVS and has been awarded a $12 billion contract to build 225.000 electric cars. It plans to launch 5 new models. The city of Leipzig in Germany recently took delivery of a new 50-strong fleet of BMW i3s, to be used by city council and municipal waterworks employees, amongst others, according to a recent press release. On a recent trip to Vermont I stopped at Prestige BMW in New Jersey on both legs of the journey. They recently installed two 24 kW DC Fast Charge stations that are accessible 24/7 and free to use. A robust DC Fast charge infrastructure is crucial for mass EV adoption. The Mercedes-Benz S550e Plug-In Hybrid is packed with some of the best safety technology and creature comforts you can get in any new car today, regardless of price. It also moves smartly, with an advanced plug-in hybrid system that lets you plug in overnight—or even for a few hours—and then drive for a dozen or so miles before transitioning into an especially smooth gasoline-electric hybrid. Mercedes says its GLE 500 e plug-in hybrid SUV is 42% more energy efficient than its conventional cousin over its lifetime, even though it requires more energy to build. XALT Energy to Supply Li-ion Packs to Efficient Drivetrains for PHEVs XALT Energy and Efficient Drivetrains (EDI) announced a tentative agreement through which XALT will supply EDI with its NMC graphite Lithium-ion battery energy storage packs for use in EDI’s PHEV PowerDrive and electric power export solutions. Chevrolet has trademarked the names Corvette E-Ray and E-Ray. Does that mean an electric Corvette is planned? Maybe, if only to compete with Porsche. Researchers at Tsinghua University, with colleagues from the University of Science and Technology Beijing, have discovered that the multi-reversible magnetization of ferromagnetic material can be controlled via the lithiation/delithiation reaction in a Li-ion battery by varying the discharge–charge potential at room temperature. This phenomenon couples magnetism and electrochemistry, and enables precise quantitative magnetization manipulation using an electrochemical method. An open-access paper on their discovery is published in the ACS journal Nano Letters. Navigant Forecasts Global Light Duty Electrified Vehicle Sales to Exceed 6.0M in 2024; PEVs to Account for Roughly Half In a new report, Electric Vehicle Market Forecasts, Navigant research projects that under its base scenario, global sales of light duty electrified vehicles (i.e., vehicles that use electricity for traction, including hybrids, plug-in hybrids, and battery-electrics) will grow from 2.6 million vehicle sales in 2015 to more than 6.0 million in 2024. As discussed in this article by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard in the Telegraph, the “OPEC Oil Outlook” recently published assumes that neither global warming regulation nor electric vehicles will influence oil demand much until 2040. The California DMV announced that the maximum of 85,000 Green Clean Air Vehicle Decals had been issued to plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, denying new Volt and plug-in Prius owners the coveted sticker allowing them free access to HOV and HOT lanes. I don’t know which channel my daughter in law was streaming onto their projector, but just before they dropped the ball in Times Square, Bill Nye the Science Guy told the world that he hopes in 2031 that we can reach 80% electric cars on the road. He said once you drive an electric vehicle you will never go back… How true, how true. The fifth race of the second Formula E season will be held March 12 in Mexico City at the historic Autodromo Hermano Rodriguez before moving to Long Beach. Bain: Germany’s Goal of 1M Electric Cars by 2020 is Unattainable; Fewer than 50,000 Units on Road by End of This Year The German Federal Government plan to have one million electric cars on its roads by 2020 has failed, according to the analysis of international management consulting firm Bain & Company. By the end of 2015, there will be a total of about 50,000 electric cars and plug-in hybrids on the roads in Germany (about 75% below plan); nevertheless, structural transformation towards electromobility is continuing, according to the firm. Environmental groups have sent a letter to CARB urging the Volkswagen be punished to the full extent of the law for selling diesel powered cars it knew did not conform to state emissions regulations. If every other passenger car in Norway is plugged into the electric network by 2020, Europe will have to produce more electricity – mainly from coal-fired power plants – to meet the demand. But it will be a plus for the climate nonetheless. Aside from my own presentation, which I’ll share soon, there are a couple more EV Transportation & Technology Summit presentations that I recorded and wanted to share. I don’t have much to say about them, so I’ll just drop the videos below. COP21 was arguably one of the most epic meetings in the history of humanity. In a spirit of mutual cooperation, the international community agreed to finally begin to turn away from a fossil fuel-powered economy toward a clean, sustainable future. While it may be important to make general commitments to cut CO2 and methane emissions, and to keep under a certain temperature increase, what it comes down to in the end is making practical changes in how we live our lives and run our societies. Analysis of EV Charging in Ireland Suggests Public Fast-Charging Infrastructure May Become Commercially Viable in Short- to Medium Term A study of EV charging behavior by a team at Trinity College Dublin has found that, from the household data available, EV users prefer to carry out the majority of their charging at home in the evening—the period of highest demand on the electrical grid indicating that incentivization may be required to shift charging away from this peak grid demand period. The Dutch electric vehicle charging solutions company EV-Box will now be entering the markets of the nearby countries of Belgium and Luxembourg, according to a recent email sent to EV Obsession. A new solar powered EV charging station in the city of Vestby, Norway will produce 16,000 kWh of electricity annually, enough to go 47,000 miles in a Tesla. Aside from my own presentation, which I’ll share soon, there are a couple more EV Transportation & Technology Summit presentations that I recorded and wanted to share. I don’t have much to say about them, so I’ll just drop the videos below. Tesla faces headwinds from rivals. You’ve read it ad nauseum. But it you’re American, then Tesla could face headwinds from you. American motorists fall into two categories: current plaintiffs and future plaintiffs. We like to sue. In fact, we sue better than we drive. And we’re about to give ourselves more excuses to sue. Autonomous driving could start a litigation beat-down for any company that dares pioneer it. Autonomous technology will be the hot topic in the world of automobiles in 2016, as all carmakers rush to bring self-driving cars to market. Oil giant Exxon was studying climate change impacts in the 1970s and 80s, and their projections from 35 years ago accurately portray what is happening now. Knowing what they knew, they chose to continue business as usual. Now this astounding article in the LA Times. Car-Free Movement Gaining Steam in Europe and Elsewhere Athlyn Cathcart-Keays of The Guardian-Cities chronicles the advancement of the international urban car-free movement as well as auto regulations that focus on air pollution. The most recent city to join the growing list is Oslo, Norway. On December 18, Congress passed a bill to fund the government for fiscal year 2016. This particular bill includes $500 million in funding for the tremendously popular TIGER discretionary grant program, the same funding level as fiscal year 2015. The TIGER program helps communities build a broad range of innovative transportation projects, including improvements for people on bikes. Chicago, with funding from the four major wireless carriers, has achieved a major amenity for transit users: 4G internet service along 22 miles of subway tracks in the CTA system. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) is implementing a new vision for “transit-oriented communities.” As a result of the “defeat device” software it installed in diesel cars, Volkswagen faces multiple criminal investigations in Europe. And it will likely face criminal penalties in the U.S., along with hundreds of civil suits from angered owners. Now, it seems the company may also be in legal trouble in China over potential diesel-emissions cheating. COP21: Shows the End of Fossil Fuels is Near, We Must Speed Its Coming The wheel of climate action turns slowly, but in Paris it has turned. There’s much in this deal that frustrates and disappoints me, but it still puts the fossil fuel industry squarely on the wrong side of history.    Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters & First Followers Want.”   Come attend CleanTechnica’s 1st “Cleantech Revolution Tour” event → in Berlin, Germany, April 9–10.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


Working with scientists at two other Department of Energy (DOE) labs—Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory—a team led by Berkeley Lab battery scientist Marca Doeff was surprised to find that using a simple technique called spray pyrolysis can help to overcome one of the biggest problems associated with NMC cathodes—surface reactivity, which leads to material degradation. "We made some regular material using this technique, and lo and behold, it performed better than expected," said Doeff, who has been studying NMC cathodes for about seven years. "We were at a loss to explain this, and none of our conventional material characterization techniques told us what was going on, so we went to SLAC and Brookhaven to use more advanced imaging techniques and found that there was less nickel on the particle surfaces, which is what led to the improvement. High nickel content is associated with greater surface reactivity." Their results were published online in the premier issue of the journal Nature Energy in an article titled, "Metal segregation in hierarchically structured cathode materials for high-energy lithium batteries." The facilities used were the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven, both DOE Office of Science User Facilities. These results are potentially significant because they pave the way for making lithium-ion batteries that are cheaper and have higher energy density. "We still want to increase the nickel content even further, and this gives us a possible avenue for doing that," Doeff said. "The nickel is the main electro-active component, plus it's less expensive than cobalt. The more nickel you have, the more practical capacity you may have at voltages that are practical to use. We want more nickel, but at the same time, there's the problem with surface reactivity." The cathode is the positive electrode in a battery, and development of an improved cathode material is considered essential to achieving a stable high-voltage cell, the subject of intense research. Spray pyrolysis is a commercially available technique used for making thin films and powders but has not been widely used to make materials for battery production. The surface reactivity is a particular problem for high-voltage cycling, which is necessary to achieve higher capacities needed for high-energy devices. The phenomenon has been studied and various strategies have been tried to ameliorate the issue over the years, including using partial titanium substitution for cobalt, which counteracts the reactivity of the surfaces to some extent. At SSRL researchers Dennis Nordlund and Yijin Liu used x-ray transmission microscopy and spectroscopy to examine the material in the tens of nanometers to 10-30 micron range. At CFN researcher Huolin Xin used a technique called electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), which was able to zoom in on details down to the nanoscale. At these two scales, Doeff and her Berkeley Lab colleagues—Feng Lin, Yuyi Li, Matthew Quan, and Lei Cheng—working with the scientists at SSRL and CFN made some important findings about the material. Lin, a former Berkeley Lab postdoctoral researcher working with Doeff and first author on the paper, said: "Our previous studies revealed that engineering the surface of cathode particles could be the key to stabilizing battery performance. After some deep effort to understand the stability challenges of NMC cathodes, we are now getting one step closer to improving NMC cathodes by tuning surface metal distribution." The research results point the way to further refinements. "This research suggests a path forward to getting these materials to cycle with higher capacities—that is to design materials that are graded, with less nickel on the surface," Doeff said. "I think our next step will be to try to make these materials with a larger compositional gradient and combine some other things to make them work together, such as titanium substitution, so we can utilize more capacity and thereby increase the energy density in a lithium ion battery." Spray pyrolysis is an inexpensive, common technique for making materials. "The reason we like it is that it offers a lot of control over the morphology. You get beautiful spherical morphology which is very good for battery materials," Doeff said. "We're not the first ones who have come up with idea of decreasing nickel on the surface. But we were able to do it in one step using a very simple procedure." Explore further: Argonne battery technology confirmed by US Patent Office


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Goodenough and UT team report new strategy for all-solid-state Na or Li battery suitable for EVs; plating cathodes | Main | Volvo Trucks introducing OTA remote programming for trucks » Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have found that adding a small, optimal amount (0.05M) of LiPF (lithium hexafluorophosphate) as an additive in LiTFSI–LiBOB dual-salt/carbonate-solvent-based electrolytes significantly enhances the charging capability and cycling stability of Li metal batteries. A paper on their work is published in the journal Nature Energy. In the paper, they report that using the additive in a Li metal battery with a 4-V Li-ion cathode at a moderately high loading of 1.75 mAh cm−2 resulted in 97.1% capacity retention after 500 cycles along with very limited increase in electrode overpotential at a charge/discharge current density up to 1.75 mA cm−2. The researchers attributed the fast charging and stable cycling performances to the generation of a robust and conductive solid electrolyte interphase at the Li metal surface and stabilization of the Al cathode current collector. Lithium (Li) metal is regarded as the ultimate anode for energy storage systems because of its ultrahigh specific capacity of 3,860 mAh g-1, a very low redox potential (−3.040 V versus standard hydrogen electrode) and a small gravimetric density of 0.534 g cm−3. Secondary Li metal batteries (LMBs) have been extensively studied in the past four decades, and received increasing attention recently because of the growing needs for high-energy-density batteries. However, technical challenges such as unsatisfied coulombic efficiency and dendritic Li growth impede the successful deployment of secondary LMBs. Recently, extensive work has been dedicated to Li metal protection, including the application of polymer or solid-state electrolytes, ionic liquids, concentrated electrolytes or additives, protective layers, interlayers between Li and separator, nanoscale design, selective deposition, Li/reduced graphene oxide composites, and others. … Here we report that significantly improved charging capability and cycling stability of LMBs using a LiNi0.4 Mn Co O (NMC, 1.75 mAh cm−2) cathode can be achieved via manipulating the lithium salt chemistry in the electrolyte to generate a highly conductive SEI on Li metal. An optimal additive level (0.05 M) of LiPF can greatly alter the interfacial reactions between Li metal and dual-salt electrolyte containing LiTFSI and LiBOB in carbonate solvents. The capacity retention of moderately high areal-capacity Li||NMC batteries could be significantly improved to >97% after 500 cycles at 1.75 mA cm−2. Corresponding author Wu Xu and colleagues were part of earlier PNNL research seeking a better-performing electrolyte. The electrolytes they tried produced either a battery that didn’t have problematic dendrites and was super-efficient but charged very slowly and couldn’t work in higher-voltage batteries, or a faster-charging battery that was unstable and had low voltages. Next, they tried adding small amounts of a salt that’s already used in lithium-ion batteries—LiPF lithium hexafluorophosphate—to their fast-charging electrolyte. They paired the new electrolyte with a lithium anode and a lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide cathode. The result was a fast, efficient, high-voltage battery. Because the additive is already an established component of lithium-ion batteries, it's readily available and relatively inexpensive. The small amounts needed—just 0.6 wt%—should also further lower the electrolyte’s cost. Xu and his team continue to evaluate several ways to make rechargeable lithium-metal batteries viable, including improving electrodes, separators and electrolytes. Specific next steps include making and testing larger quantities of their electrolyte, further improving the efficiency and capacity retention of a lithium-metal battery using their electrolyte, increasing material loading on the cathode and trying a thinner anode. This research was supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Researchers performed microscopy and spectroscopy characterizations of battery materials at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE Office of Science national User Facility at PNNL. The battery electrodes were made at DOE’s Cell Analysis, Modeling, and Prototyping Facility at Argonne National Laboratory.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

World Patent Ratings, a specialized rating agency and expert network focused on intangible asset valuation, sees a unique opportunity developing in the metals and mining sector despite rising intangible asset valautions. World Patent Ratings has been a pioneer in calling attention to the irrational valuation of intangible assets held on corporate balance sheets around the world. Through the world’s largest repository of intangible asset data, the company has been able to bring standardization and objective measure to an outdated financial reporting system. The company's Board includes notable figures such as Ambassador Dell Dailey, Former Navy Vice Admiral Al Konetzni, former US Attorney Matthew Whitaker, General Nitzan Nuriel of the Israel Defense Forces, Dr. Aileen Marty, and Scott Cooper, CEO of the World Patent Family of Companies and Director of The Cooper Idea Foundation. Through the world’s largest repository of intangible asset data, we have been able to bring standardization and objective measure to an outdated financial reporting system. World Patent Ratings membership can be achieved through four different levels of afiliation including: Basic Member, Premier Member, Trusted Partner and Accredited Partner Status. World Patent Ratings provides research reports, offers continuing professional education, and consulting services surrounding the financial reporting of intangible assets. The “World Patent Rating” online seal enhances marketplace trust and confidence in financial reporting. It displays a company’s commitment to transparency and integrity in the valuation of intangible assets. "The overall consensus is that metals and mining is going to have another down year. Clearly prices are sluggish and global demand is weak." said Scott Cooper, CEO of the World Patent Family of Companies, "We do see a unique opportunity developing in this historically cyclical sector. Based on rising stock market valuations and a consensus of low expectations, this industry is begging to dissapoint." World Patent Ratings utilizes the planet’s largest specialized repository of open source intangible asset and patent data. The company's team of data scientists has used code from over hundreds of worldwide open data sources, including the Central Intelligence Agency, EDGAR, Google, Yahoo, The New York Times, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, Amazon, Facebook, the US Census Bureau, the European Union, Pew Research Center, and the National Climactic Data Center. World Patent Ratings has initiated coverage on 100 Metal and Mining Companies listed below: Stillwater Mining Co Synalloy Corp Century Aluminum Co Thermodynetics Inc United States Steel Corp Williams Industries Inc Worthington Industries Inc Stelax Industries Ltd All Grade Mining Inc Mansfelder Metals Ltd Santa Fe Gold Corp Sutter Gold Mining Inc Sims Metal Management Ltd Olympic Steel Inc Metwood Inc Applied Minerals Inc Brilliant Sands Inc General Moly Inc Goldrich Mining Co Lucky Friday Extension Mining Co Mascot Mines Inc Huntmountain Resources Ltd USCorp New Jersey Mining Co American International Ventures Inc Timberline Resources Corp United Resource Holdings Group Inc Thunder Mountain Gold Inc Trinity Resources Inc Rock Energy Resources Inc O.T. Mining Corp SourcingLink.net Inc Ensurge Inc Southern Copper Corp Ekwan-X Inc Cibolan Gold Corp United States Antimony Corp New Wei Inc Freeport-McMoRan Inc Andes Gold Corp Texas Mineral Resources Corp Webco Industries Inc International Precious Minerals Group Inc Schnitzer Steel Industries Inc Green Leaf Innovations Inc Q-Gold Resources Ltd AK Steel Holding Corp Tamino Minerals Inc Reliance Steel & Aluminum Co Monkey Rock Group Inc Solitario Exploration & Royalty Corp Steel Dynamics Inc Golden Eagle International Inc Bourque Industries Inc Lustros Inc International Star Inc Spirit Exploration Inc NW Tech Capital Inc Midway Gold Corp Golden Phoenix Minerals Inc Tonogold Resources Inc Stamford Industrial Group Inc Metaline Contact Mines Alacer Gold Corp Rare Element Resources Ltd Fernhill Corp Britannia Mining Inc MineralRite Corp Shallbetter Industries Inc Medinah Minerals Inc New Colombia Resources Inc Silver Falcon Mining Inc U.S. Precious Metals Inc Dynaresource Inc Global Gold Corp Patriot Gold Corp Searchlight Minerals Corp Comstock Mining Inc Infinex Ventures Inc Liquidmetal Technologies Inc ATC Venture Group Inc Calissio Resources Group Inc El Capitan Precious Metals Inc Diamond Discoveries International Corp Pacific Gold Corp G & S International Minerals Inc Reno Gold Corp Liberty Star Uranium & Metals Corp Puda Coal Inc Taranis Resources Inc ZNext Mining Corporation Inc Western Sierra Mining Corp Compass Minerals International Inc NMC Inc VIPR Corp Home Solutions Health Inc Premier Investment Properties Inc Haynes International Inc Dakota Territory Resource Corp Eastern Goldfields Inc World Patent Ratings is a specialized rating agency and expert network focused on the standardization and objective measure of intangible assets and the valuation of intellectual property. Our in-depth research of financial practices is intended to uncover truth and meaning in data. We aim to guide policymakers and opinion leaders working to modernize the valuation of corporate assets and bring back confidence and accountability to corporate asset valuation in the global marketplace. In addition, World Patent Ratings, through its expert network offers the following consulting services in the areas of: The company has repeatedly warned about the intangible asset bubble. The extreme volatility and the lack of consensus surrounding the accounting of patents and other intangible assets has created a cloud over the global economy. Our mission is to prevent the continued use of creative accounting and a distortion of reported asset values. We are pioneering an accounting revolution geared towards standardization and transparency. The World Patent Family of Companies recently announced the launch of the World Patent Ratings University Innovation Index and The World Patent Marketing Review Board. World Patent Marketing provides free referrals for inventors looking to patent ideas and offers engineering and manufacturing services for new and innovative products. In addition, the company provides internet marketing services through World Patent Digital. For more information about World Patent Ratings, please visit our website at https://worldpatentratings.com.


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: cleantechnica.com

The Chinese market had 6,260 new EVs registered in January, far from the 15,275 units of January 2016, dragging down the plug-in market share (of new cars sold) to just 0.25% — far below the 1.45% of 2016. Considering the seasonality of the Chinese PEV market, where the first quarter is always the slowest selling (due to the December sales rush and New Year holidays), a considerable month-over-month drop was already expected — for example, December 2015 electric car sales reached 35,000 before dropping to 15,000 in the following month. What surprised experts was the size of the fall — 6,260 units is setting back the market two years. The reasons for this unexpected drop will be explained below. For now, let’s focus on last month’s registrations by model. In January, SAIC and BAIC took over the top positions. Tesla also moved up, benefitting from the local sales drought to post a best ever #5 position. Here are last month’s top 5 best selling EV models: #1 – SAIC Roewe e550: Shangai-based SAIC won its first monthly best seller trophy last month, thanks to 956 registrations of its e550, the plug-in hybrid version of Roewe’s Audi A4-sized 550 ICE model. This plug-in hybrid packs an 11.8 kWh LiFePO4 battery, delivering an all-electric range of 58 km (36 mi), for a price of CNY 249,000, or ~$36,200. Despite winning the yellow jersey in the first stage of the race, don’t expect this model to stay on top for long. Once the incentives effect wanes and BYD gets its act together, the e550 should be easily displaced from the podium, a bit like Mark Cavendish in last year’s Tour de France. #2 – BAIC EU260: In the midst of the incentives drop, the BAIC EU260 got off to a good start, with 812 cars being delivered, winning a precious advantage over the BYD champs, something that could prove crucial in the final stages of 2017 (when racing for the yellow jersey). With a generous 41.4 kWh battery, 260 kilometers of range, and 136 horsepower pulling it to a 0–100 km/h acceleration of 9 seconds, it doesn’t have the sports sedan aspirations of the BYD Qin EV300, but it’s no slouch. Undercutting the aforementioned Qin EV300 by some 5,000 Yuan (CNY 255,000), this is one of the most serious candidates for the “2017 Best Seller” title. #3 – BAIC EC180: After being shown last November, this little city car got off to a great start in December, seeing 4,128 sales. It registered another 724 registrations last month. The EC180 has the advantage of offering a faux-crossover look, okay interiors, and a usable 180 kms range thanks to a 20.3 kWh battery. BAIC has great ambitions for this car and is promising more models from the same platform. Now, about those subsidies… #4 – JMC E100: If the Chinese government has its way, this is car representative of a dying breed, but the bargain-basement JMC E100 city car still managed to deliver 701 units in January, so these little buggers will probably keep on zooming around for quite some time. #5 – Tesla Model X: Y’all know this one, right? With a number of logistical issues arising for Tesla in December, a sizeable number of Model Xs weren’t delivered until January. We estimate that the Tesla Model X had some 624 registrations in China last month, which together with the current incentives standoff helped the Californian SUV to reach the #5 spot in the Chinese PEV ranking, a best-ever position for a foreign model. Now, don’t you worry, Tesla shorts, this is most certainly a freak event and doesn’t mean that Tesla has finally broken the Chinese market. Looking elsewhere, both SAIC and JMC placed a second model in the top 10, with Shanghai Auto pulling its e950 large sedan — a 289,000 Yuan ($42,000) PHEV based on the 2010 Buick Lacrosse(!) — to 7th Place. But the real news are the low, low numbers of BYD models, with the #8 BYD Tang being the best of them. With only 278 deliveries, one has to go back 4 years to find such low numbers for the manufacturer. Rumors say that the Chinese manufacturer is preparing new batteries with a different chemistry (NMC?). Considering that BAIC and SAIC weren’t so affected by the incentives delay, it seems BYD took this waiting period to make big changes and pause manufacturing. We have to wait and see what the cause for this slump was, but we are contacting BYD about the matter to try to get more insight. Looking at the January manufacturer ranking, the surprise leader is BAIC — 26% market share — followed by SAIC Roewe (23%) and JMC (18%). Interestingly, Tesla (4th, 12%) ended the month ahead of BYD (5th, 9%), which says a lot about the strangeness of the current Chinese ranking. Then again, these are strange times… Looking forward, the Chinese government set a goal of 2 million “New Energy Vehicles” (NEV = BEV + PHEV + FCEV) in 2020. Considering 2016 ended with a 1 million NEV fleet already, one would only need some 300,000 per year to reach the desired objective, an easy task. But with subsidies set to be cut off by 20% each year and more demanding conditions applied (they must be safer cars, have larger range, and be more highway capable), a large portion of the market (e.g., ultra-cheap city cars) will suffer. They will struggle to have access to subsidies, but they are not completely alone, since regular EVs will also lose part of the price advantage given to NEVs by generous incentives. The solution to offset the incentives cut will be dropping costs through scale, and that game can only be played by a number of OEMs — like BYD, BAIC, SAIC, and Geely. Ultimately, the Chinese EV industry will benefit, because it will have fewer but stronger players, more ready to take on foreign manufacturers head on. But they will be sacrificing certain players on the way. What January showed us is that: A) The market will become more concentrated, with the top manufacturers distancing themselves from the others. B) Volume numbers will suffer, especially in the first quarter, with the remaining quarters probably recovering the lost time, but don’t expect the ludicrous growth rates of 100% or so of the past 3 years to be repeated in the short term. Also published on our EV sales page, CleanTechnica, and the EV Sales blogspot. Also published on our EV sales page, EV Obsession, and the EV Sales blogspot. 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News Article | January 25, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Jan. 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Stephen Campbell, Principal Scientist at Nano One Materials (TSX-V:NNO) (Frankfurt:LBMB) (OTCBB:NNOMF), today announced an innovation that significantly increases throughput and further decreases the cost of Nano One’s process for the fabrication of lithium ion battery materials. This is new Intellectual Property that also improves the performance of resulting materials and it has been filed provisionally with the U.S. Patent Office. “This is an important enhancement to our processing technology that will reduce capital costs, processing steps and operating costs of our production size plants,” said Dr. Campbell. “We have also seen improved battery performance from the resulting cathode materials.” To view an enhanced version of this image [Initial discharge curves showing improved performance of High Voltage Spinel (LiNi Mn O ) using Nano One’s advanced process.], please visit: http://orders.newsfilecorp.com/files/3606/24708_a1485306669584_29.jpg Preliminary cell data shown here indicates increased power for Cobalt Free, High Voltage Spinel made with this new process. “This innovation also applies to the fabrication of the full range of lithium ion cathode materials, including spinels, lithium iron phosphates (LFP) and all formulations of nickel manganese cobaltate (NMC),” added Dr. Campbell. “We expect to boost capacity of the pilot plant that is under construction, which we will then be able to demonstrate to strategic interests looking for technology, cost and performance advantages.” This improvement builds on previously issued patents and it expands the company’s intellectual property portfolio. It was filed as a Provisional U.S. Patent Application directed to advances in the proprietary process for the fabrication of nanopowders for lithium ion battery (LIB) cathodes. These technology advances were developed with the ongoing support of National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) under the Cobalt Free High Voltage Spinel project announced on June 30, 2016. “We are grateful for IRAP’s support,” said CEO Dan Blondal. “I also want to thank the Nano One team for their dedication and innovative approach. This is a substantial development that adds considerable value to our core processing technology. I look forward to seeing it in action as we ramp up demonstrations of the pilot plant in 2017.” For information with respect to Nano One or the contents of this news release, please contact John Lando (President) at (604) 669-2701 or visit the website at www.nanoone.ca. Nano One Materials Corp (“Nano One” or “the Company”) is developing novel and scalable processing technology for the low-cost production of high performance battery materials used in electric vehicles, energy storage and consumer electronics. The patented technology can be configured for a wide range of nanostructured materials and has the flexibility to shift with emerging and future battery market trends and a diverse range of other growth opportunities. The novel three-stage process uses equipment common to industry and is being engineered for high volume production and rapid commercialization. Nano One’s mission is to establish its patented technology as a leading platform for the global production of a new generation of nanostructured composite materials. For more information, please visit www.nanoone.ca National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) is Canada’s premier innovation assistance program for small and medium-sized enterprises. For over 60 years, IRAP has been stimulating wealth creation for Canada through technological innovation. This is largely accomplished by providing technology assistance and financial support to small and medium-sized enterprises at all stages of the innovation process, to build their innovation capacity. IRAP helps small and medium-sized enterprises understand the technology issues and opportunities and provides linkages to the best expertise in Canada. http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/irap/index.html Certain information contained herein may constitute “forward-looking information” under Canadian securities legislation. Forward-looking information includes, but is not limited to, statements with respect to the actual receipt of the grant monies, the execution of the Company’s plans which are contingent on the receipt of such monies and the commercialization of the Company’s technology and patents. Generally, forward-looking information can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as 'believe', 'expect', 'anticipate', 'plan', 'intend', 'continue', 'estimate', 'may', 'will', 'should', 'ongoing', or variations of such words and phrases or statements that certain actions, events or results “will” occur. Forward-looking statements are based on the opinions and estimates of management as of the date such statements are made and they are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements or forward-looking information, including: the completion of final documentation with SDTC and the receipt of all necessary regulatory approvals. Although management of the Company has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in forward-looking statements or forward-looking information, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements and forward-looking information. The Company does not undertake to update any forward-looking statements or forward-looking information that is incorporated by reference herein, except as required by applicable securities laws. NEITHER THE TSX VENTURE EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATION SERVICES PROVIDER (AS THAT TERM IS DEFINED IN THE POLICIES OF THE TSX VENTURE EXCHANGE) ACCEPTS RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS NEWS RELEASE


Jeff Dahn’s battery technology research team at Dalhousie University in Canada has developed a new means of improving high-voltage, lithium-ion battery cell performance through the use of cyclic carbonates as the enablers for ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC)-based electrolytes, rather than conventional options, according to recent reports. The research showed that the cyclic carbonates in question — VC (vinylene carbonate), FEC (fluoroethylene carbonate), and DiFEC ((4R,5S)-4,5-Difluoro-1,3-dioxolan-2-one) — reportedly worked well as the enablers for the aforementioned EMC-based electrolytes when used in NMC442/graphite battery cells tested at high voltages (up to 4.4 V or 4.5 V). The work clarified that the conventionally used ethylene carbonate (EC) electrolyte additive is detrimental to lithium-ion battery cell health (cycle and calendar life) at high voltages. EC use (for passivation of graphite electrodes during initial cycles) is now known to be associated with oxidation, gas generation, and impedance growth — meaning that removal has been shown to increase the working life of high-voltage lithium-ion cells. Here’s an explanation of the work directly from the paper: “In this paper, four ‘enablers’ including EC, VC, FEC and DiFEC were compared head to head in NMC442/graphite pouch type Li-ion cells. Other enablers such as SA, MEC, PES will not be included in this paper but will be discussed in latter publications. Experiments were made using ultra high precision coulometry (UHPC), a precision storage system, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a gas measurement. Gas evolution during formation and cycling, coulombic efficiency, charge endpoint capacity slippage during cycling, and EIS spectra before and after cycling, were examined and were compared to EC-based electrolyte with some promising additive blends.” As an example, the combo of EMC with specific amounts of some of the enablers mentioned above resulted in battery cells with improved performance as compared to battery cells with EC-containing electrolytes with additives, when tested up to 4.5 V. The paper provides more: “The work in this paper suggests that EC itself is the root cause of many issues associated with the operation of NMC/graphite cells to high potential. Electrolyte oxidation reactions at high voltages cause gas evolution and impedance growth, leading to cell failure. These parasitic reactions become very problematic at 4.5 V even with state of the art electrolyte additives PES211 in EC:EMC electrolyte. … This work demonstrates that cyclic carbonates such as VC, FEC, and DiFEC can act as the enablers for EMC-based electrolytes which function well in NMC442/graphite cells tested up to 4.4 or 4.5 V.” The paper notes that more work needs to be done in order to “optimize the amount of these and other enablers and to find other co-additives that can be used together with these enablers to improve cell performance. It is very likely that other enablers can also function well. It is also very likely other linear carbonates besides EMC can function well in electrolytes without EC. Further work may also include the exploration of cycling performance at high temperature, low temperature, high rate as well as the performance in different cell chemistries (ie. LiCoO2 (LCO)/graphite and LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA)/graphite Li-ion cells). It is essential that other researchers get involved in such searches.” A couple of final things that should be noted with regard to this work: A patent has been filed for the work by 3M; financial support was provided by NSERC and 3M Canada through the Industrial Research Chairs program; and, while Dahn is now in an exclusive 5-year research partnership with Tesla that began in June, most or all of this work predates that agreement. The new work is detailed in a paper published in the Journal of Power Sources, and another paper has been submitted by the researchers to the Journal of the Electrochemical Society.   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article | February 7, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: The material at the heart of the lithium ion batteries that power electric vehicles, laptop computers and smartphones has been shown to impair a key soil bacterium, according to new research published online in the journal Chemistry of Materials. The study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Minnesota is an early signal that the growing use of the new nanoscale materials used in the rechargeable batteries that power portable electronics and electric and hybrid vehicles may have untold environmental consequences. Researchers led by UW-Madison chemistry Professor Robert J. Hamers explored the effects of the compound nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC), an emerging material manufactured in the form of nanoparticles that is being rapidly incorporated into lithium ion battery technology, on the common soil and sediment bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. "As far as we know, this is the first study that's looked at the environmental impact of these materials," says Hamers, who collaborated with the laboratories of University of Minnesota chemist Christy Haynes and UW-Madison soil scientist Joel Pedersen to perform the new work. NMC and other mixed metal oxides manufactured at the nanoscale are poised to become the dominant materials used to store energy for portable electronics and electric vehicles. The materials, notes Hamers, are cheap and effective. "Nickel is dirt cheap. It's pretty good at energy storage. It is also toxic. So is cobalt," Hamers says of the components of the metal compound that, when made in the form of nanoparticles, becomes an efficient cathode material in a battery, and one that recharges much more efficiently than a conventional battery due to its nanoscale properties. Hamers, Haynes and Pedersen tested the effects of NMC on a hardy soil bacterium known for its ability to convert metal ions to nutrients. Ubiquitous in the environment and found worldwide, Shewanella oneidensis, says Haynes, is "particularly relevant for studies of potentially metal-releasing engineered nanomaterials. You can imagine Shewanella both as a toxicity indicator species and as a potential bioremediator." Subjected to the particles released by degrading NMC, the bacterium exhibited inhibited growth and respiration. "At the nanoscale, NMC dissolves incongruently," says Haynes, releasing more nickel and cobalt than manganese. "We want to dig into this further and figure out how these ions impact bacterial gene expression, but that work is still underway." Haynes adds that "it is not reasonable to generalize the results from one bacterial strain to an entire ecosystem, but this may be the first 'red flag' that leads us to consider this more broadly." The group, which conducted the study under the auspices of the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology at UW-Madison, also plans to study the effects of NMC on higher organisms. According to Hamers, the big challenge will be keeping old lithium ion batteries out of landfills, where they will ultimately break down and may release their constituent materials into the environment. "There is a really good national infrastructure for recycling lead batteries," he says. "However, as we move toward these cheaper materials there is no longer a strong economic force for recycling. But even if the economic drivers are such that you can use these new engineered materials, the idea is to keep them out of the landfills. There is going to be 75 to 80 pounds of these mixed metal oxides in the cathodes of an electric vehicle." Hamers argues that there are ways for industry to minimize the potential environmental effects of useful materials such as coatings, "the M&M strategy," but the ultimate goal is to design new environmentally benign materials that are just as technologically effective. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: onlinelibrary.wiley.com

Lithium (Li) metal has been considered as an important substitute for the graphite anode to further boost the energy density of Li-ion batteries. However, Li dendrite growth during Li plating/stripping causes safety concern and poor lifespan of Li metal batteries (LMB). Herein, fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additives are used to form a LiF-rich solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). The FEC-induced SEI layer is compact and stable, and thus beneficial to obtain a uniform morphology of Li deposits. This uniform and dendrite-free morphology renders a significantly improved Coulombic efficiency of 98% within 100 cycles in a Li | Cu half-cell. When the FEC-protected Li metal anode matches a high-loading LiNi Co Mn O (NMC) cathode (12 mg cm−2), a high initial capacity of 154 mAh g−1 (1.9 mAh cm−2) at 180.0 mA g−1 is obtained. This LMB with conversion-type Li metal anode and intercalation-type NMC cathode affords an emerging energy storage system to probe the energy chemistry of Li metal protection and demonstrates the material engineering of batteries with very high energy density.

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