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Naumenko V.,RAS D. I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology | Tyulenev Y.,RAS D. I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology | Kurilo L.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | Shileiko L.,Russian Academy of Medical Sciences | And 8 more authors.
Andrology | Year: 2014

Acute and chronic infections of the seminal tract are among the most common causes of male infertility. As at least half of male infertility cases are classified as idiopathic, some of these cases might be attributed to asymptomatic infection. The detection and quantification of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6) DNA in semen samples were performed. A total of 232 patients were divided into five groups: (i) infertile men with varicocoele; (ii) men with idiopathic infertility; (iii) infertile men with chronic inflammatory urogenital tract diseases (IUTD); (iv) fertile men with IUTD and (v) men whose partners had a history of pregnancy loss. In the study population, the prevalence of viral DNA was 17.7, 3.4% for EBV, 5.2% for CMV, 6.5% for HHV-6, 0.43% for EBV + CMV, 0.87% for EBV + HHV-6 and 1.3% for CMV + HHV-6. The median viral loads for EBV, CMV and HHV-6 were 500, 2250 and 250 copies/mL respectively. Of the sperm cell fractions, derived from infected samples 87.5% contained viral DNA. No association between EBV and fertility disorders or IUTD was found. CMV detection was much higher in the group of patients with infertility and concomitant IUTD compared with the other groups combined (18.5% vs. 5.4%, p = 0.03) and associated with reduced sperm cell count (39.5 × 106/mL vs. 72.5 × 106/mL, p = 0.036). Immunostaining of spermatozoa from infected samples and in vitro-infected cells detected CMV in sperm heads, tails and connecting pieces and revealed attachment to sperm membrane and intracellular localization. HHV-6 was the more common in fertile men with chronic IUTD than in the other groups combined (19% vs. 6.3%, p = 0.018) and had no effect on sperm parameters. The results suggest that both CMV and HHV-6 may contribute to the aetiology of IUTD and, moreover, CMV-associated IUTD can lead to male sterility. © 2014 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.


Rippa A.,Russian National Research Medical University | Leonova O.,RAS Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology | Popenko V.,RAS Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology | Vasiliev A.,Nk Koltsov Institute Of Developmental Biology | And 2 more authors.
BioMed Research International | Year: 2014

In adult skin, hair follicles cyclically self-renew in a manner that recapitulates embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. The most common pathology of hair in adults is alopecia, which is hair loss to different extent. There are a number of murine models of alopecia including spontaneous mutations. In the present study, we worked with double homozygous we/we wal/wal mice which demonstrate symptoms closely resembling human alopecia. Using whole-mount preparations of epidermis of E18.5 embryos we show that hair follicle defects can be revealed as early as during embryonic morphogenesis in these mutants. The number of hair follicles was reduced almost 1.5-fold in mutant skin. The shape of the early stage small follicles was altered in mutant animals as compared to control ones. Additionally, follicles of mutant embryos were wider at the point of conjunction with interfollicular epidermis. We believe that the mutant mice studied represent a fascinating model to address the problem of hair loss. We demonstrated alterations in the morphogenesis of embryonic hair follicle in we/we wal/wal double homozygous mice developing alopecia postnatally. We suppose that incorrect morphogenesis of hair follicles during embryogenesis is closely related to alopecia in the adult life. Unveiling the mechanisms involved in altered embryogenesis may elucidate the pathogenesis of alopecia. © 2014 Alexandra Rippa et al.


Rippa A.,Russian National Research Medical University | Terskikh V.,Nk Koltsov Institute Of Developmental Biology | Nesterova A.,Ni Vavilov Institute Of General Genetics | Vasiliev A.,Nk Koltsov Institute Of Developmental Biology | Vorotelyak E.,Moscow State University
Histochemistry and Cell Biology | Year: 2015

Mice with skin and hair follicle (HF) defects are common models of human skin disorders. A mutant strain with the we/we wal/wal genotype develops alopecia. We found the hair shaft structure in the pelage of mutant mice to have significant defects. Although these mice lose their hair at 21 days, a label-retaining cell population persists in HFs until at least day 54. Depilation-induced anagen was accomplished in we/we wal/wal mutants but the resulting hair shafts were short and extremely deformed. Serious abnormalities in epidermis stratification and HF morphogenesis exist in we/we wal/wal homozygous E18.5 embryos. There were significantly fewer HF primordia in this mutant compared with wild type. We discovered specific structures, identified as invalid placodes, positive for ectodysplasin A1 receptor, nuclear β-catenin, and LEF1, which failed to invaginate, produced a double basal-like layer of epidermal cells, and lacked cylindrical keratinocytes. Specification of dermal papillae (DP) was impaired, and the papillary dermis expressed alkaline phosphatase and LEF1. We also detected DP-like groups of intensively stained cells in the absence of visible signs of folliculogenesis in the epidermis. We showed differentiation disturbances in the mutant embryonic E18.5 epidermis and HFs: The cornified layer was absent, the width of the spinous layer was reduced, and HFs lacked LEF1-positive precortex cells. In this study, we used a very interesting and useful mouse model of alopecia. The presence of symptoms of skin disorders in we/we wal/wal murine embryos correlates with the postnatal skin phenotype. This correlation may help to evaluate reasons of alopecia. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Mishanin V.I.,Moscow State University | Trubitsin B.V.,Moscow State University | Benkov M.A.,Moscow State University | Minin A.A.,Nk Koltsov Institute Of Developmental Biology | Tikhonov A.N.,Moscow State University
Photosynthesis Research | Year: 2016

In this work, we have compared photosynthetic performance and expression of the PsbS and Lhcb1 proteins in two contrast ecotypes of Tradescantia species, T. fluminensis (shade-tolerant) and T.sillamontana (light-resistant), grown at two intensities of light: 50–125 μmol photons m−2 s−1 (low light, LL) and 875–1000 μmol photons m−2 s−1 (high light, HL). Using the EPR method for measuring the P700 content, we have found that LL-grown plants of both species have higher (by a factor of ≈1.7–1.8) contents of PSI per fresh weight unit as compared to HL-grown plants. Acclimation of plants to LL or HL irradiation also influences the Chl(a + b) level and expression of the PsbS and Lhcb1 proteins. Immunoblotting analysis showed that acclimation to HL stimulates (by a factor of ≈1.7–1.8) the level of PsbS related to the total number of P700 centers. In light-resistant species T.sillamontana, the ratio PsbS/P700 is about 2-times higher than in shade-tolerant species T.fluminensis grown under the same conditions. This should enhance the capacity of their leaves for protection against the light stress. In agreement with these observations, the capacity of leaves for NPQ induction was enhanced during plant acclimation to HL. Kinetic studies of P700 photooxidation and light-induced changes in the yield of Chl a fluorescence also revealed that the short-term regulation of electron transport processes in chloroplasts, which manifested themselves in the kinetics of (Formula presented.) induction and the rate of Chl a fluorescence quenching, occurred more rapidly in HL-grown plants than in LL-grown plants. Thus, both factors, enhanced expression of PsbS and more rapid response of the photosynthetic electron transport chain to dark-to-light transitions should increase the capacity of HL-grown plants for their resistance to rapid fluctuations of solar light. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht


PubMed | Nk Koltsov Institute Of Developmental Biology and Moscow State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Photosynthesis research | Year: 2016

In this work, we have compared photosynthetic performance and expression of the PsbS and Lhcb1 proteins in two contrast ecotypes of Tradescantia species, T. fluminensis (shade-tolerant) and T. sillamontana (light-resistant), grown at two intensities of light: 50-125molphotonsm


PubMed | Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow State University, RAS Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology and Nk Koltsov Institute Of Developmental Biology
Type: | Journal: BioMed research international | Year: 2014

In adult skin, hair follicles cyclically self-renew in a manner that recapitulates embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. The most common pathology of hair in adults is alopecia, which is hair loss to different extent. There are a number of murine models of alopecia including spontaneous mutations. In the present study, we worked with double homozygous we/we wal/wal mice which demonstrate symptoms closely resembling human alopecia. Using whole-mount preparations of epidermis of E18.5 embryos we show that hair follicle defects can be revealed as early as during embryonic morphogenesis in these mutants. The number of hair follicles was reduced almost 1.5-fold in mutant skin. The shape of the early stage small follicles was altered in mutant animals as compared to control ones. Additionally, follicles of mutant embryos were wider at the point of conjunction with interfollicular epidermis. We believe that the mutant mice studied represent a fascinating model to address the problem of hair loss. We demonstrated alterations in the morphogenesis of embryonic hair follicle in we/we wal/wal double homozygous mice developing alopecia postnatally. We suppose that incorrect morphogenesis of hair follicles during embryogenesis is closely related to alopecia in the adult life. Unveiling the mechanisms involved in altered embryogenesis may elucidate the pathogenesis of alopecia.

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