Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital

Nishiwaki, Japan

Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital

Nishiwaki, Japan
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Kawano Y.,Kobe University | Fukui C.,Kobe University | Shinohara M.,Kobe University | Wakahashi K.,Kobe University | And 16 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2017

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used for peripheral blood stem/ progenitor mobilization. G-CSF causes low-grade fever that is ameliorated by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), suggesting the activation of arachidonic acid (AA) cascade. How G-CSF regulated this reaction was assessed. G-CSF treatment in mice resulted in fever, which was canceled in prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES-1)-deficient mice. Mobilization efficiency was twice as high in chimeric mice lacking mPGES-1, specifically in hematopoietic cells, suggesting that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from hematopoietic cells modulated the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Neutrophils from steady-state BM constitutively expressed mPGES-1 and significantly enhanced PGE2 production in vitro by β-adrenergic stimulation, but not by G-CSF, which was inhibited by an NSAID. Although neutrophils expressed all β-adrenergic receptors, only β3- agonist induced this phenomenon. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry traced β-agonist-induced PGE2 synthesis from exogenous deuterium-labeled AA. Spontaneous PGE2 production was highly efficient in Gr-1high neutrophils among BM cells from G-CSF-treated mice. In addition to these in vitro data, the in vivo depletion of Gr-1high neutrophils disrupted G-CSF-induced fever. Furthermore, sympathetic denervation eliminated both neutrophil priming for PGE2 production and fever during G-CSF treatment. Thus, sympathetic tone-primed BM neutrophils were identified as one of the major PGE2 producers. PGE2 upregulated osteopontin, specifically in preosteoblasts, to retain progenitors in the BM via EP4 receptor. Thus, the sympathetic nervous system regulated neutrophils as an indispensable PGE2 source to modulate BM microenvironment and body temperature. This study provided a novel mechanistic insight into the communication of the nervous system, BM niche components, and hematopoietic cells. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.


Ueki M.,Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital | Ueki M.,Kobe University | Ueno M.,Kagawa University | Morishita J.,Kobe University | Maekawa N.,Kobe University
Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering | Year: 2013

Inflammatory mechanisms may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin is an orange-yellow polyphenol present in curry spice and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of curcumin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, cisplatin, cisplatin + curcumin and curcumin. Mice were given cisplatin (20 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) with or without curcumin treatment (100 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, immediately after cisplatin injection). Serum and renal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 concentrations, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA expression in kidney, renal function and histological changes were determined 72 h after cisplatin injection. Serum TNF-alpha concentration in the cisplatin + curcumin group significantly decreased compared with that in the cisplatin group. Renal TNF-alpha and MCP-1 concentrations and ICAM-1 mRNA expression in kidney in the cisplatin + curcumin group also significantly decreased compared with those in the cisplatin group. Consequently, cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and renal tubular necrosis scores were attenuated by curcumin treatment. These results indicate that curcumin acts to reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through its anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, curcumin may become a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.


Suehara T.,Kobe University | Morishita J.,Higashiosaka City General Hospital | Ueki M.,Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital | Ueno M.,Kagawa University | And 2 more authors.
Paediatric Anaesthesia | Year: 2016

Background: Exposure to some anesthetic agents during the fetal period has been shown to induce neurodegeneration or learning deficits in animal models. Sevoflurane is one of the most prevalent general anesthetics; however, the influence of sevoflurane at a clinically relevant concentration on the developing fetal brain remains unknown. Objective: We investigated whether a single sevoflurane exposure during the fetal period would affect neuronal development and learning/memory ability in mice. Methods: Pregnant mice at gestational day 17 were anesthetized with 1.5% sevoflurane in 50% oxygen for 6 h. Mice in the control group were exposed in 50% oxygen without sevoflurane. Pups of some mice in both groups subsequently were delivered early by cesarean section and whole fetal brains were excised. The rest of the pups were delivered naturally at gestational day 20 and were maintained for 8 weeks. The mRNA expression levels of caspase-3, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and LIM kinase-1 (LIMK-1) were measured in fetal whole brain and 8-week-old hippocampus sections. Synaptophysin protein in adult hippocampus was assessed immunochemically. In addition, 8-week-old mice were subjected to the radial maze test. Results: No significant difference between sevoflurane and control groups regarding mRNA expression levels of all targets was seen, nor was there an obvious change in synaptophysin protein expression. The results of the maze test revealed that the each-day performance ratios (the rate of errors) of the sevoflurane group were not altered as compared with the control group. Conclusions: These results suggest that the exposure during late pregnancy to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane does not affect neuronal development and learning/memory ability of offspring mice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd


Ueki M.,Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital | Ueki M.,Kobe University | Ueno M.,Kagawa University | Morishita J.,Kobe University | Maekawa N.,Kobe University
Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine | Year: 2013

Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs, but it can produce side effects such as nephrotoxicity. Inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules have important roles in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. D-Ribose is a naturally occurring five-carbon monosaccharide that is found in all living cells, and has anti-inflammatory effects in renal ischemia/ reperfusion injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of D-ribose on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Forty-eight mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, cisplatin, cisplatin + ribose, and ribose. Mice were given cisplatin (20 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) with or without D-ribose (400 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, immediately after cisplatin injection). At 72 h after cisplatin injection, we measured serum and renal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; renal expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 mRNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction; serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine; and histological changes. Cisplatin increased serum and renal TNF-α concentrations, renal MCP-1 concentration, and renal ICAM-1 mRNA expression. Treatment with D-ribose attenuated the increase in serum and renal TNF-α concentrations, renal MCP-1 concentration, and renal ICAM-1 mRNA expression. Consequently, cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and renal tubular necrosis were attenuated by D-ribose treatment. This is believed to be the first time that protective effects of D-ribose on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of inflammatory reactions have been investigated. Thus, D-ribose may become a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. © 2013 Tohoku University Medical Press.


PubMed | Kagawa University, Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital, Kobe University and Higashiosaka City General Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Paediatric anaesthesia | Year: 2015

Exposure to some anesthetic agents during the fetal period has been shown to induce neurodegeneration or learning deficits in animal models. Sevoflurane is one of the most prevalent general anesthetics; however, the influence of sevoflurane at a clinically relevant concentration on the developing fetal brain remains unknown.We investigated whether a single sevoflurane exposure during the fetal period would affect neuronal development and learning/memory ability in mice.Pregnant mice at gestational day 17 were anesthetized with 1.5% sevoflurane in 50% oxygen for 6 h. Mice in the control group were exposed in 50% oxygen without sevoflurane. Pups of some mice in both groups subsequently were delivered early by cesarean section and whole fetal brains were excised. The rest of the pups were delivered naturally at gestational day 20 and were maintained for 8 weeks. The mRNA expression levels of caspase-3, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and LIM kinase-1 (LIMK-1) were measured in fetal whole brain and 8-week-old hippocampus sections. Synaptophysin protein in adult hippocampus was assessed immunochemically. In addition, 8-week-old mice were subjected to the radial maze test.No significant difference between sevoflurane and control groups regarding mRNA expression levels of all targets was seen, nor was there an obvious change in synaptophysin protein expression. The results of the maze test revealed that the each-day performance ratios (the rate of errors) of the sevoflurane group were not altered as compared with the control group.These results suggest that the exposure during late pregnancy to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane does not affect neuronal development and learning/memory ability of offspring mice.


PubMed | Beppu University, Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital, Kobe University, Higashiosaka City General Hospital and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Journal of intensive care | Year: 2015

Sepsis is a potentially fatal syndrome mediated by an early [e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-)] and late [high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1)] proinflammatory cytokine response to infection. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with a high mortality. C-Fos/activator protein-1 (AP-1) controls the transactivation of proinflammatory cytokines via AP-1 binding in the promoter region. T-5224 is a de novo small molecule inhibitor of c-Fos/AP-1 that controls gene expression of multiple proinflammatory cytokines. We investigated whether T-5224, a selective inhibitor of c-Fos/AP-1, improves survival in lethal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI by inhibiting early (TNF-) and late (HMGB-1) proinflammatory cytokine response.Mice were divided into four groups (control, LPS, LPS+T-5224, and T-5224 only). Control mice were administered polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution orally, immediately after intraperitoneal (i.p.) saline injection. LPS mice were administered PVP solution orally immediately after i.p. LPS (10mg/kg) injection. LPS+T-5224 mice were administered T-5224 orally (300mg/kg) immediately after i.p. LPS injection. T-5224 mice were administered T-5224 orally (300mg/kg) after i.p. saline injection. Serum concentrations of TNF-, HMBG-1, and interleukin (IL)-10 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine concentrations were commercially analyzed. Finally, histological examination was performed on the kidney.Treatment with T-5224 decreased serum TNF- and HMGB-1 levels and increased survival after LPS injection. Furthermore, T-5224 treatment decreased serum BUN and creatinine concentrations but increased serum IL-10 concentration. LPS-induced pathological changes in kidney were attenuated by T-5224 treatment.These results suggest that T-5224, a selective inhibitor of c-Fos/AP-1, inhibits expression of early and late proinflammatory cytokines, protecting mice from LPS-induced lethality. T-5224 is a potential approach for decreasing lethality in sepsis-induced AKI.


PubMed | Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital, Osaka University, Kobe University, Hokkaido University and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: Blood | Year: 2016

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used for peripheral blood stem/progenitor mobilization. G-CSF causes low-grade fever that is ameliorated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), suggesting the activation of arachidonic acid (AA) cascade. How G-CSF regulated this reaction was assessed. G-CSF treatment in mice resulted in fever, which was canceled in prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES-1)-deficient mice. Mobilization efficiency was twice higher in chimeric mice lacking mPGES-1, specifically in hematopoietic cells, suggesting that PGE


Kubokawa I.,Kobe University | Yachie A.,Kanazawa University | Hayakawa A.,Kobe University | Hirase S.,Kobe University | And 10 more authors.
BMC Pediatrics | Year: 2014

Background: TAFRO syndrome is a unique clinicopathologic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease that has recently been identified in Japan. It is characterized by a constellation of symptoms: Thrombocytopenia, Anasarca, reticulin Fibrosis of the bone marrow, Renal dysfunction and Organomegaly (TAFRO). Previous reports have shown that affected patients usually respond to immunosuppressive therapy, but the disease sometimes has a fatal course. TAFRO syndrome occurs in the middle-aged and elderly and there are no prior reports of the disease in adolescents. Here we report the first adolescent case, successfully treated with anti-IL-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab, TCZ) and monitored with serial cytokine profiles.Case presentation: A 15-year-old Japanese boy was referred to us with fever of unknown origin. Whole body computed tomography demonstrated systemic lymphadenopathy, organomegaly and anasarca. Laboratory tests showed elevated C-reactive protein and hypoproteinemia. Bone marrow biopsy revealed a hyperplastic marrow with megakaryocytic hyperplasia and mild reticulin fibrosis. Despite methylprednisolone pulse therapy, the disease progressed markedly to respiratory distress, acute renal failure, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Serum and plasma levels of cytokines, including IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, neopterin and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors I and II, were markedly elevated. Repeated weekly TCZ administration dramatically improved the patient's symptoms and laboratory tests showed decreasing cytokine levels.Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of TAFRO syndrome in a young patient, suggesting that this disease can occur even in adolescence. The patient was successfully treated with TCZ. During our patient's clinical course, monitoring cytokine profiles was useful to assess the disease activity of TAFRO syndrome. © 2014 Kubokawa et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital, Kobe University and Mie University
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Cancer genetics | Year: 2015

We identified a novel fusion gene, FOXP1-PDGFRA, in a patient with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) with eosinophilia, harboring the chromosome abnormality t(3;4)(p13;q12). The patient responded well to imatinib and has remained in molecular remission for 3 years. This is the seventh fusion gene involving PDGFRA in MPN with eosinophilia. PDGFRA was truncated in its autoinhibitory domain, as in other PDGFRA-related MPNs, and was fused to FOXP1 at its functional forkhead domain. Comparing genomic DNA with mRNA sequences provides the possibility that the splicing process near the breakpoint junction in the FOXP1-PDGFRA fusion gene may use the normal splice donor site for intron 23a of FOXP1 and the cryptic splice acceptor site in exon 12 of PDGFRA. This is the first report to describe the FOXP1-PDGFRA fusion gene in MPN.


PubMed | Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Tohoku journal of experimental medicine | Year: 2013

Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs, but it can produce side effects such as nephrotoxicity. Inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules have important roles in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. D-Ribose is a naturally occurring five-carbon monosaccharide that is found in all living cells, and has anti-inflammatory effects in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of D-ribose on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Forty-eight mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, cisplatin, cisplatin + ribose, and ribose. Mice were given cisplatin (20 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) with or without D-ribose (400 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, immediately after cisplatin injection). At 72 h after cisplatin injection, we measured serum and renal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; renal expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 mRNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction; serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine; and histological changes. Cisplatin increased serum and renal TNF- concentrations, renal MCP-1 concentration, and renal ICAM-1 mRNA expression. Treatment with D-ribose attenuated the increase in serum and renal TNF- concentrations, renal MCP-1 concentration, and renal ICAM-1 mRNA expression. Consequently, cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and renal tubular necrosis were attenuated by D-ribose treatment. This is believed to be the first time that protective effects of D-ribose on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of inflammatory reactions have been investigated. Thus, D-ribose may become a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

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