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News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

According to a new market research report "Hyperspectral Imaging Systems Market by Component (Hyperspectral Cameras, Accessories), Application (Military Surveillance, Remote Sensing, Machine Vision/Optical Sorting, Life Sciences & Medical Diagnostics) - Global Forecast to 2021" published by MarketsandMarkets, the global market is projected to reach USD 12.71 Billion by 2021 from USD 7.41 Billion in 2016 at a CAGR of 11.4% during the forecast period (2016-2021). Browse 67 market data Tables and 28 Figures spread through 109 Pages and in-depth TOC on "Hyperspectral Imaging Systems Market" Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report. The report provides a detailed overview of the major drivers, restraints, challenges, opportunities, current market trends, and strategies impacting the Hyperspectral Imaging Systems Market along with the estimates and forecasts of the revenue. Growth of this market can be attributed to technological innovation in sensor design, increasing number of research projects using hyperspectral imaging systems, widening industrial applications of HSI, and manufacturing of low-cost cameras that are lightweight and compact. However, increased cost of hyperspectral cameras and the complexity in processing and analyzing the high amounts of imaging data generated are restraints for the growth of this market. The Hyperspectral Imaging Systems Market is segmented on the basis of component, application, and region. Based on component, the market is categorized into hyperspectral cameras and accessories. In 2016, the hyperspectral cameras segment is expected to account for the largest share of the market. Increasing adoption for new applications and development of low-cost hyperspectral cameras have significantly boosted the adoption of hyperspectral cameras. On the basis of application, the market is categorized into military surveillance, remote sensing, machine vision/ optical sorting, life sciences & medical diagnostics, and other applications (colorimetry, meteorology, thin film manufacturing, and night vision). In 2016, military surveillance segment is expected to account for the largest share of the Hyperspectral Imaging Systems Market. The life sciences and medical diagnostics segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period. Growth of the life sciences and medical diagnostics segment can be attributed to recent advances in hyperspectral cameras, image analysis methods, and computational power providing opportunities in medical applications. In 2016, North America is expected to account for the largest share of the Hyperspectral Imaging Systems Market, primarily due to the high adoption of hyperspectral imaging systems in research, growth in research funding, technological advancements, and increasing awareness on the benefits of hyperspectral imaging in commercial industries in this region. The Asia-Pacific region is estimated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period. Major players in Hyperspectral Imaging Systems Market include Headwall Photonics, Inc. (U.S.), Corning Incorporated (U.S.), SPECIM, Spectral Imaging Ltd. (Finland), Resonon (U.S.), Telops Inc. (Canada), Norsk Elektro Optikk AS (Norway), Applied Spectral Imaging (U.S.), BaySpec Inc. (U.S.), Surface Optics Corporation (U.S.), and ChemImage Corporation (U.S.). Optical Imaging Market by Technique (OCT, NIRS, HSI, PAT) by Product (Imaging System, Camera, Lens, Software) by Therapeutic Area (Ophthalmology, Oncology, Neurology, Dermatology), by Application (Pathological, Intra-operative) - Global Forecast to 2020 MarketsandMarkets is the largest market research firm worldwide in terms of annually published premium market research reports. Serving 1700 global fortune enterprises with more than 1200 premium studies in a year, M&M is catering to a multitude of clients across 8 different industrial verticals. We specialize in consulting assignments and business research across high growth markets, cutting edge technologies and newer applications. Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model - GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. M&M's flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "RT" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets. The new included chapters on Methodology and Benchmarking presented with high quality analytical infographics in our reports gives complete visibility of how the numbers have been arrived and defend the accuracy of the numbers. We at MarketsandMarkets are inspired to help our clients grow by providing apt business insight with our huge market intelligence repository. Connect with us on LinkedIn @ http://www.linkedin.com/company/marketsandmarkets


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Everyone talks about how health care is the biggest crisis facing retirees, but unfortunately that crisis takes a distant second to another, far more serious issue. Most retirees don't have any money. A 2015 National Institute on Retirement Security study found that the median working-age household has just $14,500 in retirement savings -- woefully short of the hundreds of thousands in savings truly needed to retire in the first place. That's not to say that health care isn't a retirement crisis in and of itself -- it is. But when comparing and contrasting the two, it's clear which one is more pressing, and it isn't soaring drug prices. The extremely troublesome retirement savings numbers. One of the authors of the 2015 NIRS study, Ilana Boivie, agrees that the $14,500 figure is startlingly low. But why? "Forty-five percent of all households, and 41 percent of near-retirement households, do not have a retirement account at all. So, when you take all of these people into account (who essentially have $0), the median balance is very low," Boivie says. But even when you only consider those people with retirement accounts, the average person near retirement age has just $104,000 in investments saved up. "Even this is far less than what people need for a secure retirement. Converted to an annuity, it would only bring in a few hundred dollars per month," Boivie says. By the time someone is 67, experts recommend having anywhere from five to eight times your annual income saved up for your golden years. Seeing as most employed Americans make far more than $13,000 to $20,800 in their final years of employment, you can see how devastatingly low that $104,000 figure is. Considering many Americans have traditional IRAs and 401(k)s, that means they'll have to pay tax on their earnings when they withdraw their funds, further diminishing the size of their investments. Health care. That said, health care costs are also on the rise, and that remains one of the most prominent, concerns facing soon-to-be retirees. [See: 9 ETFs to Buy When the Market Tanks.] Numbers from PwC, the international auditor and professional services firm, shows the troublesome reason health care continues to become more unaffordable: Reliably each year, health care costs rise by more -- far, far more, in fact -- than inflation. In 2007, health care costs rose by 11.9 percent. Though that growth rate has been declining, coming down to 6.5 percent in 2016, it's still light years higher than inflation. The pace of inflation in 2007 and 2016, respectively, was 2.8 percent and 1.3 percent. While rising drug prices certainly contribute to this issue, another problem for many retirees is the cost of places like retirement homes. "Almost 70 percent of people over age 65 will require long-term care services at some point, and more than 40 percent will need nursing home care," says Pamela Yellen, a two-time New York Times bestselling author and financial security expert. "Based on the average cost of a private nursing home and the average length of stay, you would need about $255,000 to cover a stay," Yellen says. In other words, average nursing home costs alone are more than 2.5 times what the typical retiree has saved up. So why isn't health care the central part of the retirement savings crisis? Because of this sad truth: The debate on soaring health care costs is totally irrelevant if you have no savings to begin with. It doesn't matter how cheap something is or how much you plan in your later years if you can't afford it at almost any price. What can be done to solve the retirement savings crisis? Nari Rhee is director of the Retirement Security Program at the University of California-Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education. Along with Boivie, she was co-author of the 2015 NIRS study that highlighted the severity of the retirement savings crisis with its discovery that the median retirement-age household had just $14,500 saved up. She says there are two big public policy changes that can help ameliorate the current crisis. "First and foremost is Social Security. That really is the safety net. It's guaranteed lifetime income. That has to be protected and probably expanded," Rhee says. "The second thing is: Public policy should be making it a lot easier for workers to save. Some states are offering these automatic IRA programs," says Rhee, citing upcoming programs in Oregon and California. "It would be really good if these large-scale programs got up and running and could show that they can improve the retirement security of workers who've been left out of the employer-sponsored system." [See: 7 of the Best Health Care Stocks to Buy for 2017.] Sure, everyone should have a retirement plan, and everyone should have a portfolio of investments and make regular contributions to their account over time, taking tax consequences into consideration. But the ideal solution of simply saving more when you're younger simply isn't possible for people nearing the age of retirement, or for those who don't have benefits like employer-matched plans. So while saving and investing more is always better, it doesn't do much as a practical solution for people already in their 50s and 60s. John Divine is an investing reporter for U.S. News & World Report, where he covers financial markets and the economy, with a focus on individual stock analysis. He has been an investor himself for over 10 years, and has been writing professionally about stocks and investing for the last five years. He previously wrote about the stock market for The Motley Fool and InvestorPlace, and his work has appeared on Yahoo! Finance, MSN Money, and AOL DailyFinance. He graduated from Appalachian State University in 2011 with a bachelor's degree in finance and banking. At Appalachian, he was a member of the Bowden Investment Group, a team of students that ran a real-money portfolio worth over $100,000. You can follow him on Twitter or give him the Tip of the Century at jdivine@usnews.com.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Study indicates PCI of NIRS-defined lipid-rich plaque is safe and not associated with a greater incidence of adverse outcomes compared to PCI of non lipid-rich plaque WASHINGTON - November 1, 2016 - Two-year results from COLOR, the first large-scale multicenter prospective study of its kind, found that PCI on coronary artery lipid-rich plaque (LRP) detected by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was not associated with subsequent major adverse cardiac events (MACE) compared to PCI of non-LRPs. Findings were reported today at the 28th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. The clinical impact of lipid-rich plaque (LRP) in patients with coronary atherosclerosis undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is poorly understood. Autopsy-based studies have suggested that LRP may be associated with increased PCI risk and subsequent events. Catheter-based near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can identify the presence and extent of LRP in the coronary artery. Previous case reports, as well as small studies, have suggested an association between LRP as assessed by NIRS and peri-procedural outcomes after PCI. The COLOR registry was a prospective, multicenter, observational study designed to determine whether LRP detected by NIRS is associated with subsequent major adverse cardiac events (MACE). LRP was detected using an intracoronary NIRS imaging catheter that provides an assessment of coronary lipid distribution. Lipid core burden index (LCBI) was calculated as the fraction of yellow pixels within a scanned region multiplied by 1000. A total of 1,899 patients at 22 sites in the United States underwent NIRS during a clinically indicated catheterization procedure. The primary endpoint was MACE (a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, revascularization and hospitalization) at two years. MACE occurring within two years were adjudicated by an independent clinical events committee and further classified as to whether they arose from the originally treated coronary segments (culprit) or untreated segments (non-culprit). The relationship between baseline LCBI and MACE at two years was also evaluated. Pre-intervention NIRS of treated coronary segment(s) was available in 1,168 patients (1,265 lesions), and NIRS of untreated segment(s) was available in 927 patients (1,072 lesions). The overall rate of MACE at two years was 14.1% for all patients, 6.0% related to the culprit lesion, 8.3% related to the non-culprit lesion related, and 2.4% indeterminate. Culprit lesion related MACE at two years was 6.3% for maxLCBI4mm "In this large-scale registry, non-culprit lesion related events were a little more common than culprit lesion post-PCI related events during two-year follow-up," said Giora Weisz, MD, Chairman of Cardiology at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel. "The results also indicate that PCI of NIRS-defined lipid rich plaques was safe, and was not associated with increased peri-procedural or long-term adverse outcomes compared to PCI of non-LRPs. Additional studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of NIRS-defined non-culprit LPRs." The COLOR trial was funded by InfraReDx, Inc. Dr. Weisz reported being a medical advisory board member for AngioSlide, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Calore, Corindus, Medtronic, Medivisor, MI Medical Incentives, TriSol, and Vectorius. He also disclosed grant/research support from AngioSlide, Boehringer Ingelheim, Corindus, and Matrizyme, as well as ownership in Filterlex. The results of the COLOR Trial will be presented on Tuesday, November 1 at 12:30 PM ET in the Main Arena (Ballroom, Level 3) at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 28th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

Paralysed people have communicated with their families by thought alone, thanks to a technique that learns to recognise brain activity associated with “yes” or “no”. The method is non-invasive and has enabled completely “locked-in” people to describe their lives as “wonderful”. The four people involved in the study all have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – a degenerative disorder that causes people to stop being able to control their muscles, until they are unable even to move their eyes. It has been impossible to know what such completely locked-in people are thinking. “It is assumed that being cut off from communication is one of the worst states a human can be in,” says Niels Birbaumer at the Wyss Center in Geneva. To find out, Birbaumer and his colleagues have combined two devices that record brain activity. The first, called NIRS, measures blood in active brain regions by passing a beam of light through the head. Alongside this, the team used EEG electrode caps to record brainwave activity, to tell if a person was awake or asleep. The group trained their device to recognise the brain activity associated with “yes” and “no” by posing simple statements. “We might say, ‘your name is this, you did that in your past’,” says team member Ujwal Chaudhary at the University of Tübingen. It took up to three weeks to train the device to detect “yes” and “no” with 70 per cent accuracy. At that point, they started asking the four patients questions the team didn’t know the answer to. “We might ask them if they were in pain, or if they wanted to visit a certain place or meet a certain person,” says Chaudhary. Each question was asked 10 times. If the team’s device recorded a “yes” seven or more times, then they took that as the person’s answer. “One of our patients is a young woman, only 23 years old,” says Birbaumer. “She told us that she wanted to see New York, so now her family is making preparations to take her there. Another woman wanted to visit her brother in Spain.” “I believe this is very useful,” says Nick Ramsey at University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands. The team used the device to ask the four people if they were happy. “They say that life is wonderful,” says Birbaumer. Many people, including some medical professionals, assume that paralysed people have a low quality of life. Birbaumer says that in his experience, this isn’t true. Some research suggests locked-in people are unable to process negative emotions, says Chaudhary. “They’re only processing positive emotions, and if that happens, you’re basically happy all the time,” he says. “We don’t know why that is, but it seems as though the brain is trying to protect itself.” The people also gave opinions, for better or worse. One man was asked by his granddaughter if he would give her his blessing to marry a younger man. “Eight times, his answer was no,” says Chaudhary. Read more: Most ‘locked-in’ people are happy, survey finds


WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A new issue brief offers the first detailed analysis for U.S. audiences on the U.K.’s new retirement policy initiatives. Faced with a daunting retirement savings shortfall, U.K. policymakers instituted a series of reforms that has expanded retirement plan coverage for workers. The United Kingdom’s New Retirement Savings Program is the latest issue brief from the National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS). It is co-authored by John A. Turner, director of the Pension Policy Center, and Jennifer Erin Brown, NIRS manager of research. A webinar is scheduled for Monday, December 5, 2016, at 2 PM ET to review the findings. Register at no charge here. Download the research brief here. As outlined in the research brief, the U.K. reforms require all employers to automatically enroll their employees in retirement savings account. Also, employers are required to contribute to the retirement plan if an employee participates, although individuals can opt-out. The U.K. also sponsors its own retirement plan – the National Employment Savings Trust (NEST) – so that all employers are able to offer their employees a plan. The new reforms are being phased in over time and will be fully implemented by 2018. During the remainder of 2016 and in 2017, U.K. employers with 30 or fewer employees will enroll their employees in a plan. Already, the U.K. has expanded coverage by six million workers. The total increase in coverage of nine million workers is expected when the program is fully implemented in 2017. “U.S. policymakers would be wise to examine the reforms the U.K. has implemented. We have a deep and serious retirement savings shortfall in the U.S., and legislative efforts that attempted to move the needle on retirement savings and coverage have failed,” said Jennifer Brown, report co-author. In the United States, nearly 40 million – or 45 percent – of working-age households do not have a retirement account, such as a 401(k) plan or an Individual Retirement Account (IRA). This shortfall in retirement savings means that the typical working household has virtually no retirement savings, and more than more than three out of five near-retirement households have less than one times their income saved for retirement. “Ten years ago, Congress clarified that employers could use automatic enrollment features to nudge employees to save for retirement. But sadly, the rate of retirement plan coverage is lower today than it was in 2006,” said Diane Oakley, NIRS executive director. “The experience across the pond is proof for policymakers of the power of auto-enrollment when it’s working at full capacity. In fact, many U.S states that are taking steps to help working Americans have a financial stability in retirement are considering similar automatic enrollment practices,” she explained. Brown added, “As evidenced by the recent elections, middle class Americans are angry about their economic security, and retirement is a big part of that equation. If newly-elected policymakers are going to deliver the economic security that they promised on the campaign trail, they will take action to address America’s retirement crisis. We hope this research contributes to a serious examination of policies in other nations that are working and making real progress towards closing the savings and coverage gaps.” The National Institute on Retirement Security is a non-profit, non-partisan organization established to contribute to informed policymaking by fostering a deep understanding of the value of retirement security to employees, employers and the economy. Located in Washington, D.C., NIRS’ diverse membership includes financial services firms, employee benefit plans, trade associations and other retirement service providers. More information is available at www.nirsonline.org. Follow NIRS on Twitter @nirsonline.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: phys.org

The concept of the PANIC mission envisions a tetrahedron-shaped lander with an edge length of just 13.78 inch (35 centimeters) and a total mass of some 26.5 lbs. (12 kilograms). The spacecraft's size and structure will allow it to host four scientific instruments. The lander itself will be delivered to an asteroid aboard an interplanetary probe, and once on the surface of a space rock, will utilize hopping as a locomotion mechanism in microgravity. According to the authors of the paper describing the PANIC mission concept, one of the biggest advantages of the project would be its simplicity and cost effectiveness. "We aimed at a simple and low-cost concept, mitigating potential risks. I believe it is possible to build a PANIC lander within a cost budget of $5 to $10 million, also given that the lander would be powered solely by non-rechargeable primary cells providing a life time of 24 to 36 hours," Karsten Schindler of the Technische Universität Dresden (TUD) in Germany and lead author of the paper, told Astrowatch.net. The authors of the study believe that PANIC would be a great alternative to complex and expensive traditional landers. It could be a real milestone in the history of asteroid research as no landing attempt of a dedicated lander has so far been successful on an asteroid. NASA's NEAR Shoemaker probe's landing at the end of its mission in 2001 on the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) Eros and the two touchdowns of Japan's Hayabusa on the NEA Itokawa in 2005 provided only very limited information. "Both probes touched the surface, but they did not have instruments on board for an in situ analysis. A dedicated lander would be an important addition to any future asteroid exploration mission as it allows us to measure the 'ground truth' that is required to calibrate remote sensing data; a problem that each spacecraft mission faces, no matter which celestial body it explores, either remotely from orbit or during a fly-by," Schindler said. The researchers argue that it is feasible to acquire this "ground truth" data with very modest expenses in spacecraft weight, cost and operations in the micro-gravity environment of a small body. They note that the idea of the PANIC lander is to sample the surface at multiple locations, something a sample return mission would likely not be able to do. "All this information will contribute to our understanding of the composition and structure of asteroids, which is also vital in terms of the impact hazard of NEAs, and any potential countermeasures that might need to be taken one day," Schindler noted. Four instruments were proposed by the authors as the PANIC lander's scientific payload. According to the researchers, in order to get the most out of the craft, it should carry two spectrometers, one microscopic imager and one camera. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) will be used to directly determine elemental abundances at the landing site, while the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS) will be used to study the mineralogy and optical properties at wavelengths of 0.8 – 2.5 µm. With a spatial resolution of 6 µm/pixel, the Microscopic Imager (MIC) will investigate the grain size distribution and search for evidence of rims formed by nano-phase. The stereo camera (SC) system will enable imaging of the surrounding terrain in one direction from the lander using its wide-angular optics and measure the distance and size of geological surface features. "We feel the minimum payload should be a combination of a near-infrared spectrometer and a microscopic imager. Why? Spectral properties are significantly influenced by particle size, surface temperature, phase angle and irradiation," Schindler said. For instance, NIRS using a calibrated light source and a well defined viewing geometry close to the surface, would help to interpret remotely acquired spectra. "To validate various techniques to model spectra, we need an information about the average particle size that can only be obtained from microscopic images. Likewise, these images could allow us to see changes in the optical characteristics that result from space weathering," Schindler added. The concept of PANIC lander was inspired by Hayabusa's MINERVA lander as well as by CubeSats. MINERVA was a model to follow for them, as it was built entirely from commercial, off-the-shelf components on an extremely low budget. This Japanese mini-spacecraft demonstrated a life time of 18 hours at Itokawa, despite its fate of escaping the asteroid's gravity field. In 2008, during NASA's summer study workshop known as the Small Spacecraft Summer Study Project (S4P), the idea of the PANIC lander evolved. The workshop, aimed at designing missions to near Earth objects (NEOs), resulted in the "Didymos Explorer" binary rendezvous mission concept and PANIC was included in this study, boosting the interest in this low-cost small asteroid characterizer. "After the end of the program, we continued with an in-depth study of the lander as a stand-alone instrument, whose science objectives apply to any mission to an asteroid, independent of the final target selection. We finished our study in September 2009, and published all findings subsequently in Acta Astronautica. We had interested parties at NASA, DLR (German Aerospace Center), the Max Planck Society and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), all studying missions to near-Earth asteroids at that time, and presented this concept at various meetings (e.g. the European Planetary Science Congress and the Planetary Defense Conference), receiving multiple inquiries from different sides," Schindler revealed. Although the PANIC concept is currently in early stages of development, it can be seen as a finished Phase 0 study that can be easily transformed into the basis for a proposal to acquire funding and build hardware for a future flight opportunity. Notably, a similar concept, the MASCOT lander, was studied independently and has eventually been realized for the Hayabusa 2 mission launched in December 2014. It proves that such an idea can be implemented relatively quickly.


WASHINGTON, Nov. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Nuclear power started out in the United States with the promise it would be "too cheap to meter," but may end up being "too big to bail out." A new report by the nonprofit Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS) finds that a...


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

We have it easier than cows. When we want to know how much fat, sodium, or carbohydrates are in the food we are eating, we can usually check the nutrition label on the food's package. But cows haven't had access to detailed nutrition facts about their forage. Until recently. Just as it is important for humans to watch what they eat, it is also important for farmers to watch what their cows are eating. Farmers need to make sure their cows are getting the right amounts of grass and legumes. But when the grass and legumes are grown together, it's difficult to accurately measure how much of each is in the mixture. Jerry Cherney, professor of agriculture at Cornell University, says commercial laboratories can only tell if samples are "mostly grass" or "mostly legume." This type of crude estimate just doesn't cut it. Farmers need to know what percentage of their mixture is legume and what percentage is grass, so they can make sure their cows are getting a healthy, balanced diet. To more accurately measure the composition of these forage mixtures, researchers have started using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS). Legume and grass molecules vibrate at different frequencies, emitting invisible energy known as infrared. Scientists can use instruments to measure specific near infrared wavelengths. Then, based on the measurements of near infrared, they can determine what percentage of a mixture is legume and what percentage is grass. But even NIRS has its challenges. Mainly, in order to provide accurate measurements, the instruments need to be calibrated. "In the past, NIRS calibrations were typically instrument-specific. They only worked with the instrument used to develop the calibration," explains Cherney. So Cherney and his team of researchers worked to develop a single calibration that could be used with many different NIRS instruments. The research team collected samples from mixed forage fields of alfalfa and grass at 91 sites throughout eight counties in New York. They collected three years of samples to develop their calibration. They collected another year of samples to use later, to verify their calibration. After collecting the samples, they separated the alfalfa from the grass. Then they made over 500 samples that were mixtures with known percentages of alfalfa and grass. Next, Cherney worked with Dairy One, a commercial forage testing lab, to scan all of the samples. All of the samples were scanned twice, and then the researchers used three different instruments to analyze the scans. With the analyses from the three instruments, the researchers developed four calibrations -- one for each instrument individually and one for all three instruments combined. Finally, the team tested whether the calibrations worked. They took the final year's samples and combined them into random known proportions. They scanned and analyzed these 98 samples to see if the calibration from the three instruments combined was still accurately measuring the amounts of alfalfa and grass. Ultimately, Cherney was able to show that a single calibration can measure alfalfa and grass percentages across instruments. This is great news for farmers, and cows, in the Northeast United States. Farmers now have more accurate information about what's in the food their cows are eating. But some cows may still be left guessing. "While we're confident that the calibration should work for sites in the Northeastern USA, we are not sure if it works for Midwestern grown mixtures," Cherney explained. Calibrations for other parts of the country, like the Midwest, can be developed using the same process Cherney followed in the Northeast. Read more about Cherney's work in Crop Science.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The National Institute on Retirement Security will host its eighth annual retirement policy conference, Retirement Policy Game Changers: Tackling Retirement Readiness, on Tuesday, February 28, 2017, from 7:30 AM – 3:00 PM at The Liaison Capitol Hill, 415 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. The event will feature the release of a new report, Retirement Security 2017: Americans’ View of the Retirement Crisis. This biennial report monitors how Americans feel about their economic security in retirement and assesses their views on policies that could improve retirement. Media can register for the conference here or by calling 202.457.8190. WHO: Hosted by the National Institute on Retirement Security WHEN: Tuesday, February, 28, 2017; 7:30 AM – 3:00 PM ET WHERE: The Liaison Capitol Hill, 415 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 REGISTRATION: Media interested in attending can register here, email kkenneally@nirsonline.org, or call 202.457.8190. The National Institute on Retirement Security is a not-for-profit organization established to contribute to informed policymaking by fostering a deep understanding of the value of retirement security to employees, employers, and the economy through national research and education programs. Located in Washington, D.C., NIRS has a diverse membership of organizations interested in retirement security including financial services firms, retirement plan sponsors and service providers, and trade associations among others. More information is available at http://www.nirsonline.org.


WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--America faces a deep political divide, but not when it comes to economic security in retirement. A new report finds that 76 percent of Americans are concerned about their ability to achieve a secure retirement, with that level of worry at 78 percent for Democrats and 76 percent for Republicans. Some 88 percent of Americans agree that the nation faces a retirement crisis, and the concern is high across party lines. These findings are contained in a new study, Retirement Security 2017: America’s View of the Retirement Crisis and Solutions available here. The research is published by the National Institute on Retirement (NIRS) and is based on a poll of 800 Americans conducted by Greenwald & Associates. The findings will be reviewed today at the NIRS annual retirement policy conference in Washington, D.C. “If we learned anything from the recent elections, it’s that Americans are beyond angry about their economic insecurity. So it shouldn’t be surprising that Americans – Democrats and Republicans alike – are highly anxious about economic security in retirement,” said Diane Oakley, NIRS executive director. “We also find that across party lines, Americans strongly support state efforts to help Americans save for retirement. Yet, the House of Representatives passed a resolution that will hinder these state plans. Some 72 percent of Republicans support these state retirement plans, while 83 percent of Democrats are supportive,” Oakley explained. “If the new Congress and Administration are serious about addressing Americans’ economic anxiety, a bold first step would be to make a long-term fix to private sector pension funding rules and to strengthen Social Security. Our poll finds that 77 percent of Americans say that the disappearance of pensions is killing the American dream, and they are strongly opposed to cutting Social Security for current and future retirees,” Oakley explained. The key research findings are as follows: 1. Across party lines, Americans are worried about economic insecurity in retirement. Three-fourths (76 percent) of Americans are concerned about economic conditions affecting their ability to achieve a secure retirement. For respondents that identified themselves as Democrats, the level of concern was at 78 percent compared to 76 percent for Republicans. 2. Americans in overwhelming numbers continue to believe the nation faces a retirement crisis. Some 88 percent of Americans agree that the nation faces a retirement crisis. The level of concern is high across gender, income, age and party affiliation. Importantly, more than half (55 percent) strongly agree that there is a crisis. To ensure a secure retirement, three-fourths of Americans plan to work longer and to spend less in retirement. 3. Americans regard pensions as a route to economic security in retirement, and see these retirement plans as better than 401(k) accounts. We find that some 82 percent of Americans have a favorable view of pensions. A full 85 percent say all workers should have access to a pension plan so they can be independent and self-reliant in retirement. More than three-fourths of Americans (77 percent) say the disappearance of pensions has made it harder to achieve the American Dream. Some 71 percent of Americans say that pensions do more to help workers achieve a secure retirement as compared to 401(k) plans, and 65 percent say pensions are safer than 401(k) plans. 4. Americans say national leaders still don’t understand their retirement struggle, and they remain highly supportive of state efforts to address the retirement crisis. An overwhelming majority of Americans (85 percent) say leaders in Washington do not understand how hard it is to prepare for retirement, which held steady from 87 percent in 2015. Similarly, 86 percent say leaders in Washington need to give a higher priority to ensuring that Americans have a secure retirement. In terms of solutions, 82 percent of Americans say government should make it easier for employers to offer pensions. Action at the state level to expand access to retirement savings get a favorable nod, Americans believe that state-sponsored retirement savings programs for workers not covered by their employers’ a plans are a good idea (75 percent), and 81 percent say they would consider participating in a state plan. 5. Protecting Social Security remains important to Americans. Some 76 percent of Americans say it is a mistake to cut government spending to reduce Social Security benefits for current retirees, up from 73 percent in 2015. When it comes to adjusting benefits for future generations, 73 percent oppose cutting government spending that reduces Social Security benefits. 6. Americans strongly support pensions for public sector workers and see these retirement plans as a strong recruitment and retention tool. Americans strongly support pensions for police officers and firefighters (90 percent), and teachers (81 percent). Some 81 percent say these benefits are deserved because public employees help finance the cost from every paycheck, up from 77 percent in 2015. The survey was conducted as a nationwide telephone interview of 800 Americans age 25 or older in to assess their sentiment regarding retirement and actions policymakers could take to strength retirement. Greenwald & Associates balanced the data to reflect the demographics of the United States for age, gender and income. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.5 percent. The National Institute on Retirement Security is a non-profit, non-partisan organization established to contribute to informed policymaking by fostering a deep understanding of the value of retirement security to employees, employers and the economy as a whole. Located in Washington, D.C., NIRS’ diverse membership includes financial services firms, employee benefit plans, trade associations, and other retirement service providers. More information is available at www.nirsonline.org. Follow NIRS on Twitter @nirsonline.

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