Bunkyo-ku, Japan

Nippon Medical School

www.nms.ac.jp
Bunkyo-ku, Japan

Nippon Medical School is a private university in Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan. In 1876, Tai Hasegawa established a medical school in Tokyo. At that time, the Japanese government and the ministry of education had never permitted any medical schools except The University of Tokyo School of Medicine. So, during the Meiji era, people who wanted to be medical doctor had to take an exam to receive a medical doctor's license. The Saisei Gakusha was a cram school to pass the exam. Many famous medical doctors, for example, Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Yayoi Yoshioka, would graduate from the Saisei Gakusha. The medical school, which was called Saisei Gakusha, had been temporarily closed by the president of the school, Mr. Tai Hasegawa in 1903. In 1904, the students and the faculties of the school established a new medical school, which was named Nippon Medical School. Mr. Kenzo Isobe became the president of Nippon Medical School. Then, Mr. Masatsugu Yamane, who was a member of House of Representatives, became the president and director of Nippon Medical School. During the Taisho era, the ministry of education had eventually permitted to establish new medical school.At that time, there were three big private medical schools in Japan, Keio University School of Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine and Nippon Medical School. Keio University became University in 1920. Jikei University School of Medicine became University in 1921. And, Nippon Medical School became University in 1926. Only those private Medical Schools were University in that era.Because of that reason,those medical schools were regarded as "SHIRITSU IDAI GOSANKE", the big three. During the World War Ⅱ, Nippon Medical school was damaged by air raids between 1944 and 1945. The main hall of Nippon Medical School which had built in the Taisho era was burned down in 1945. The first hospital of the Nippon Medical School which had built by the romanesque architecture style in the Tisho era was recently bulldozed. Nippon Medical School is now one of the most famous private medical schools in Japan. At present, the entrance exam of the school is highly competitive. The medical research level of the school is also so high. So, Nippon Medical School is very popular in Japan. Many famous medical doctors in Japan graduate from Nippon Medical School. The medical school have three hospitals, the main Hospital, the Chiba Hokuso Hospital, the Tamanagayama Hospital and the Musashi Kosugi Hospital. The history of Nippon Medical School has passed over 100 years. Including national universities, Nippon Medical School is regarded as celebrated medical school in Japan.Nippon Medical School officially says that Kenzo Isobe is the founder of the school. Wikipedia.


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PubMed | Nippon Medical School
Type: | Journal: Cytopathology : official journal of the British Society for Clinical Cytology | Year: 2016

Pleomorphic lobular carcinoma (PLC) is a subtype of breast cancer with unique morphological features, but it remains controversial whether PLC should be considered an independent disease entity. The aim of this study was to illustrate cytopathological characteristics of PLC in comparison with other lobular carcinoma variants.We investigated clinicopathological features of PLC (n = 11) compared with those of other variants of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC, non-PLC) (n = 32). Histological variants of the non-PLC group consisted of classic (n = 25), solid (n = 2), alveolar (n = 1) and a tubulolobular type (n = 4). A review of cytological reports and fine needle aspiration (FNA) smear samples was performed for the PLC (n = 9) and non-PLC (n = 27) groups.Patients with PLC were older, and had a higher nuclear grade and a higher incidence of axillary lymph node metastasis and triple negative phenotype than non-PLC patients (P = 0.007, P < 0.001, P = 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively). Cytological findings in PLC included medium- to large-sized nuclei, prominent nucleoli, a moderate-to-severe degree of pleomorphism, apocrine change and background necrosis, none of which were evident in the smears of the non-PLC group (P < 0.001, P = 0.002, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.03, respectively). Despite these differences, patients with PLC and non-PLC showed similar clinical outcomes in our follow-up period.Based on our results, a cytological diagnosis of PLC should be proposed if there are moderate- to large-sized nuclei, prominent nucleoli, a moderate-to severe degree of nuclear pleomorphism, apocrine change and necrosis in the background in FNA biopsy samples.

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