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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Tracey Campbell has lived for seven years with lymphedema, a chronic condition that causes unsightly swelling in her left leg. The disease, which stems from a damaged lymphatic system, can lead to infections, disfigurement, debilitating pain and disability. There is no cure. The only available treatment is to wear compression garments or use massage to suppress the swelling, which can occur throughout the body in some cases. Campbell — who had two quarts of excess water in her left leg by the time she was diagnosed — has for years worn restrictive garments 24 hours a day and has spent an hour each night massaging the lymph fluid out of her leg. Lymphedema is uncomfortable, exhausting and dangerous if left uncontrolled. As many as 10 million Americans and hundreds of millions of people worldwide suffer from the condition, many from the after-effects of cancer therapy treatments. “There’s this extra layer of emotional burden,” said Campbell, who added that she has to be constantly vigilant to protect against infection. “All you want to be is normal.” Now there’s new hope for a possible pharmaceutical treatment for patients like Campbell. A study led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine has uncovered for the first time the molecular mechanism responsible for triggering lymphedema, as well as a drug with the potential for inhibiting that process. The study was published May 10 in Science Translational Medicine. “We figured out that the biology behind what has been historically deemed the irreversible process of lymphedema is, in fact, reversible if you can turn the molecular machinery around,” said Stanley Rockson, M.D., professor of cardiovascular medicine and the Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine at Stanford. Rockson shares senior authorship of the study with Mark Nicolls, M.D., professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine. Stanford research scientists Wen “Amy” Tian, PhD, and Xinguo Jiang, M.D., Ph.D., share lead authorship of the study and are also affiliated with the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. “This is a fundamental new discovery,” said Nicolls, who is also a researcher at the VA Palo Alto. The researchers found that the buildup of lymph fluid is actually an inflammatory response within the tissue of the skin, not merely a “plumbing” problem within the lymphatic system, as previously thought. Working in the lab, scientists discovered that a naturally occurring inflammatory substance known as leukotriene B4, or LTB4, is elevated in both animal models of lymphedema and in humans with the disease, and that at elevated levels it causes tissue inflammation and impaired lymphatic function. Further research in mice showed that by using pharmacological agents to target LTB4, scientists were able to induce lymphatic repair and reversal of the disease processes. “There is currently no drug treatment for lymphedema,” Tian said. Based on results of the study, the drug bestatin, which is not approved for use in the United States but which has been used for decades in Japan to treat cancer, was found to work well as an LTB4 inhibitor, with no side effects, she said. Based on the research, bestatin (also known as ubenimex), is being tested in a clinical trial that started in May 2016 — known as ULTRA — as a treatment for secondary lymphedema, which occurs because of damage to the lymphatic system from surgery, radiation therapy, trauma or infection. Primary lymphedema, on the other hand, is hereditary. The results of the research pertain to both types. Rockson is principal investigator for this multisite phase-2 clinical trial. “The cool thing about this story — which you almost never see — is that a clinical trial testing the therapy has already started before the basic research was even published,” Nicolls said. “This is the first pharmaceutical company-sponsored trial for a medical treatment of lymphedema, a condition that affects millions.” Nicolls and Tian are co-founders of Eiccose LLC. Eiccose is now part of Eiger BioPharmaceuticals, which gets the drug from Nippon Kayaku in Japan. Eiger is sponsoring the clinical trial. Nicolls and Rockson are both scientific advisers to the company. The study, which got underway about four years ago, began somewhat uniquely as a collaboration between two labs that were studying two completely different diseases. At the time, the Nicolls lab, where Tian works, was studying pulmonary hypertension. The Rockson lab was conducting lymphedema research. The two teams met through SPARK, a Stanford program designed to help scientists translate biomedical research into treatments for patients. “I was in a privileged position of seeing two faculty conducting important research and recognizing the possible link in causality,” said Kevin Grimes, M.D., associate professor of chemical and systems biology and co-founder of SPARK. “It occurred to me that both diseases affected vascular tissues and had strong inflammatory components.” “He blind-dated us,” Nicolls said. “When Amy Tian and I looked at the data from Stan’s research, Amy said, ‘It looks like it could be the same molecular process.’” “It was an arranged marriage between us and Stan which worked out great,” Tian said. At the time, Rockson had begun to suspect that lymphedema was an inflammatory disease. This led to his team’s discovery that the anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen successfully helped to relieve lymphedema symptoms, although it wasn’t a perfect drug; side effects were a concern, and it remained unclear how the drug worked at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the Nicolls lab had discovered that LTB4 was part of the cycle of inflammation and injury that keeps pulmonary hypertension progressing. When researchers blocked LTB4 in rats with the disease, their symptoms lessened and blood vessels became less clogged, lowering blood pressure in the lungs. “When we became aware of Mark’s work, we began to realize that we were both possibly dealing with the activation of steps downstream of the 5-LO [5-lipoxygenase] pathway,” Rockson said. “This became intriguing and formed the basis of our relationship.” The two teams joined forces to figure out the mechanism that triggered lymphedema, hopefully revealing a target for drug treatment in humans. After determining that ketoprofen was primarily working on the 5-LO pathway, the researchers began blocking the various endpoint pathways after 5-LO activation in mouse models of lymphedema, Rockson said. “It turned out that, in fact, we were both dealing with the same branch, which is LTB4,” Rockson said. “So now it became clear we really were dealing with a very similar biological process in two different diseases,” he said. “Because of Mark’s work in pulmonary hypertension, we knew that we had an ideal form of therapy that we could try in lymphedema as well.” The Nicolls lab had used the drug bestatin, which blocks the enzyme that generates LTB4, to reverse pulmonary hypertension disease processes. When researchers tested bestatin in the mouse lymphedema model, it worked to reverse symptoms of that disease. “I’m still in awe,” Rockson said. “There are few situations where you take a problem at the bedside, and go into the lab, and then take discoveries back to the bedside. It’s amazingly gratifying.” Campbell, who is now participating in the double-blinded, placebo-controlled bestatin trial at Stanford, remains hopeful. “When all of the sudden one of your limbs begins to swell, you want to understand what the heck is going on,” she said. “It’s a tough condition that few people seem to care about, even though millions and millions suffer with it. We’re hoping for something that gives some relief.” Eiger BioPharmaceuticals has licensed intellectual property developed by Tian, Rockson, Jiang, Kim and Nicolls involving the targeting of LTB4 for the treatment of lymphedema.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Japan Market Report for Uterine Fibroid Embolization Devices 2017 - MedCore" report to their offering. In Japan, embolization procedures are projected to increase over the forecast period. In the field of gynecology, the embolization market covers polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and microspheres as well as the percentage of procedures performed using gelatin sponge particles. The momentum towards embolization procedures was in part triggered by the approval of microspheres to enter the Japan market in 2013. Specifically, Nippon Kayaku (authorized distributor for Merit Medical Systems, Inc.) received authorization for the distribution and marketing of Embosphere Microspheres and HepaSphere Microspheres in June 2013. Embosphere Microspheres are particularly valuable as the most clinically studied round embolic, [that] provide consistent and predictable results for effective embolization in the treatment of uterine fibroids, hypervascular tumors, and arteriovenous malformations. They are often referred to as the gold standard for UFE procedures. The increase in procedure numbers is further fueling the growth in total unit sales. The market is comprised of microspheres and PVA particle sub-markets respectively. There is an overarching market shift towards microsphere particles both in Japan and globally. The volume of microspheres required per procedure is much higher than the volume of PVA particles required per procedure; 2.4 microspheres are used for every 1.4 PVA particles required per procedure. The shift towards microspheres has augmented unit sales, causing them to increase at an even faster rate than procedure numbers. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/xrhfpt/japan_market


— The global Dyes market is valued at 8149.95 million USD in 2016 and is expected to reach 11024.85 million USD by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of 5.16% between 2016 and 2022. Companies profiled in this report are Archroma, Huntsman, Kiri Industries, Nippon Kayaku, Kyung-In, Colourtex, Jay Chemicals, Everlight Chemical, BEZEMA, Bodal Chemical, Sumitomo, Eksoy, Aarti Industries Ltd, Osaka Godo, Setas, Atul, Anand International, LonSen, Runtu, Jihua Group, Transfar, Hubei Chuyuan, Tianjin Hongfa, YaBuLai Dyestuff, Yabang, Linfen Dyeing, Dalian Dyestuffs, Zhongdan, ANOKY, Tianjin Dek Chemical, Zhejiang Jinguang Industrial, Matex Chemicals and more. Analysis by Product Types, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into • Disperse Dyes • Reactive Dyes • Sulfur Dyes • Vat Dyes • Acid Dyes • Other Analysis by Applications, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Dyes in each application, can be divided into • Textile • Leather • Paper • Other Table of Contents: 1 Dyes Market Overview 2 Global Dyes Competition by Players, Type and Application 3 USA Dyes (Sales, Revenue and Price) 4 China Dyes (Sales, Revenue and Price) 5 Europe Dyes (Sales, Revenue and Price) 6 Northeast Asia Dyes (Sales, Revenue and Price) 7 India Dyes (Sales, Revenue and Price) 8 Southeast Asia Dyes (Sales, Revenue and Price) 9 Global Dyes Players Profiles and Sales Data 10 Dyes Manufacturing Cost Analysis 11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers 12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders 13 Market Effect Factors Analysis 14 Global Dyes Market Forecast (2017-2023) 15 Research Findings and Conclusion 16 Methodology and Data Source Inquire more about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/482910 For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-dyes-sales-market-report-2017


Eiger management will provide an update on enrollment in the Phase 2 LIBERTY study of ubenimex for the treatment of PAH and announce timelines and plans for topline data. "Inflammation is now recognized as an important component of PAH which is not addressed by currently available therapies," said Mark Nicolls, MD, Chief of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.  "Our recently published preclinical studies suggest that elevated LTB levels may play a role in the inflammatory component of PAH, which can lead to obstructed arterioles, vasoconstriction, and worsening cardiac function.  Targeted LTB blockade may represent an important new therapeutic approach to PAH disease." "The LIBERTY study represents a clinical translational effort with potential for disease modification in PAH," said Roham Zamanian, MD, Lead Investigator and Director of the Adult Pulmonary Hypertension Program at Stanford University School of Medicine.  "While currently approved vasoactive agents have utility in the clinical management of the symptoms of PAH, they do not address the underlying inflammation which is an important signature of this cardiovascular disease.  We have arrived at a moment of shift of therapeutic paradigm, where we may have a chance to realize a potentially disease modifying approach." Dr. Mark Nicolls is a practicing pulmonologist and investigator, and the Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Stanford as well as the Director of Lung Immunology.  He holds an endowed Chair of Medicine (The Stanford Chair of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine), is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI), and is a permanent standing member on the NIH study section RIBT (Respiratory Integrative Biology and Translational Research Study Section).  He is an NIH-funded investigator whose laboratory focuses on the contribution of immunity in vascular injury in pulmonary hypertension, lung transplantation and lymphedema.  Dr. Nicolls leads the first NIH trial of immunotherapy as a treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Dr. Roham Zamanian is Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Director of the Adult Pulmonary Hypertension Program at Stanford University School of Medicine, and a faculty member of the Vera Moulton Wall Center for Pulmonary Vascular Disease.  He has been the Director of the Adult Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) Program since 2007.  The Stanford Adult Pulmonary Hypertension Program evaluates and treats approximately 600-700 PH patients annually.  Besides an active clinical career, Dr. Zamanian is extensively engaged in clinical translational research.  He directs the Vera Moulton Wall Center clinical database and biobank and focuses his research on clinical characterization and impact of novel risk factors such as methamphetamine use, and biomarkers, such as insulin resistance, in PAH.  Dr. Zamanian has re-focused the research mission of the Stanford PH program by collaborating with basic science faculty and implementing several proof-of-concept and phase II clinical trials of novel therapeutics developed at Stanford University. This event is intended for institutional investors, sell-side analysts, investment bankers, and business development professionals only.  Please RSVP in advance if you plan to attend, as space is limited.  To reserve a spot, please contact LifeSci Advisors, LLC at Mac@LifeSciAdvisors.com. A live and archived webcast of the event, with slides, will be available at http://lifesci.rampard.com/20170510/reg.jsp and on the Investors section of the Eiger website at www.eigerbio.com. LIBERTY is a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 study of ubenimex in patients with PAH.  Patients are randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive ubenimex or matching placebo, administered orally for a total of 24 weeks.  Patients who complete treatment through Week 24 are eligible to enroll in an open-label extension study to receive continued treatment.  This open-label extension will allow all patients the option to receive ubenimex for at least 24 additional weeks and provide additional data on safety, tolerability and efficacy. LTB is a naturally-occurring inflammatory mediator shown to be elevated in both animal models of PAH as well as human PAH disease.  Published preclinical results of studies conducted at Stanford University suggest that elevated LTB levels may play a role in the inflammatory component of PAH, which can lead to obstructed arterioles, vasoconstriction, and worsening cardiac function.  Targeted LTB blockade may represent an important new therapeutic approach to this disease. Ubenimex is a well-characterized, oral, small-molecule, inhibitor of LTA H, the enzyme responsible for the formation of the pro-inflammatory mediator, LTB .  Ubenimex is approved in Japan (brand name Bestatin™) as an adjunct to chemotherapy agents to extend survival and to maintain remission after treatment for acute non-lymphocytic leukemia in adults.  Ubenimex has been used for over 25 years in Japan and remains commercially available through Nippon Kayaku.  Ubenimex has been granted Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of PAH by the US FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA).  Ubenimex is not approved for any indication in the US or Europe. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a type of high blood pressure that affects the arteries in the lungs and the right side of the heart.  PAH begins when tiny arteries in the lungs, called pulmonary arterioles, become narrowed, blocked or destroyed.  This makes it harder for blood to flow through the lungs, and raises pressure within the lungs' arteries.  As the pressure builds, the heart's lower right chamber (right ventricle) must work harder to pump blood through the lungs, eventually causing the heart muscle to weaken and eventually fail.  PAH is a progressive, life-threatening illness. Eiger is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company committed to bringing to market novel products for the treatment of rare diseases.  The company has built a diverse portfolio of well-characterized product candidates with the potential to address diseases for which the unmet medical need is high, the biology for treatment is clear, and for which an effective therapy is urgently needed.  For additional information about Eiger and its clinical programs, please visit www.eigerbio.com. Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties.  All statements, other than statements of historical facts, included in this press release regarding our strategy, future operations, future financial position, future revenue, projected expenses, prospects, plans and objectives, intentions, beliefs and expectations of management are forward-looking statements.  These forward-looking statements may be accompanied by such words as "anticipate," "believe," "could," "estimate," "expect," "forecast," "intend," "may," "plan," "potential," "project," "target," "will" and other words and terms of similar meaning.  Examples of such statements include, but are not limited to, whether or not pegylated interferon lambda-1a or lonafarnib or ubenimex or exendin 9-39 may be further developed and approved, and whether promising earlier clinical study results will be repeated in larger, later clinical studies, statements relating to the availability of cash for Eiger's future operations, Eiger's ability to develop its drug candidates for potential commercialization, the timing of the commencement and number and completion of Phase 2 trials and whether the products can be successfully developed or commercialized.  Various important factors could cause actual results or events to differ materially from the forward-looking statements that Eiger makes, including the risks described in the "Risk Factors" sections in the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the period ended December 31, 2016 and Eiger's periodic reports filed with the SEC.  Eiger does not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements, except as required by law. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/eiger-biopharmaceuticals-to-host-key-opinion-leader-event-addressing-need-for-novel-mechanisms-in-the-treatment-of-pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-pah-on-may-10th-in-new-york-city-300451286.html


Patent
Nippon Kayaku Co., Basf and Central Glass Co. | Date: 2014-05-23

The present invention has the objective of providing an infrared reflective film by means of which it is possible to achieve an effective heat-shielding performance with a smaller number of layers than hitherto using a construction employing specified infrared reflective layers. Solution Means The infrared reflective film of the present invention has at least two infrared reflective layers and, of these infrared reflective layers, the center reflective wavelength of at least one infrared reflective layer is between 1200 and 1300 nm. Furthermore, the laminated glass of the present invention is formed by interposing this infrared reflective film between two sheets of intermediate film, and laminating these between two sheets of glass.


Patent
Meiji Seika Pharma Co. and Nippon Kayaku Co. | Date: 2014-01-29

The present invention provides an aqueous suspended agricultural chemical composition comprising an agricultural chemical active ingredient, an alkyl naphthalene sulfonate formalin condensate and one or two or more compounds selected from the group consisting of an alkyl sulfate, a polyoxyalkylene alkyl ether sulfate, an alkyl phosphoric acid and a salt thereof, a polyoxyalkylene alkyl ether phosphoric acid and a salt thereof, and a polyoxyalkylene alkyl ether acetic acid and a salt thereof. The aqueous suspended agricultural chemical composition suppresses the crystal growth of the agricultural chemical active ingredient, and has an excellent effect on pest control and an excellent storage stability.


An objective of the present invention is to provide a crystal of 2-ethyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenoxy)quinoline-4-yl methyl carbonate having stable physicochemical properties. The objective is attained by a crystal of 2-ethyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenoxy)quinoline-4-yl methyl carbonate that exhibits a diffraction peak pattern shown in Fig. 1 as determined by powder X-ray diffractometry.


Patent
Nippon Kayaku Co. and Meiji Seika Pharma Co. | Date: 2013-09-25

An objective of the present invention is to provide a process for producing 4-carbonyloxyquinoline derivatives useful as agricultural and horticultural pesticides and fungicides. The objective can be attained by a process for producing 4-carbonyloxyquinoline derivatives represented by general formula (1), the process including reacting a quinolone derivative with a halogenated compound or an acid anhydride in the presence of a phase transfer catalyst and a base.


Patent
Meiji Seika Pharma Co. and Nippon Kayaku Co. | Date: 2015-12-09

The present invention provides an aqueous suspended agricultural chemical composition comprising an agricultural chemical active ingredient, an alkyl naphthalene sulfonate formalin condensate and one or two or more compounds selected from the group consisting of an alkyl sulfate, a polyoxyalkylene alkyl ether sulfate, an alkyl phosphoric acid and a salt thereof, a polyoxyalkylene alkyl ether phosphoric acid and a salt thereof, and a polyoxyalkylene alkyl ether acetic acid and a salt thereof. The aqueous suspended agricultural chemical composition suppresses the crystal growth of the agricultural chemical active ingredient, and has an excellent effect on pest control and an excellent storage stability.


Patent
Nippon Kayaku Co. and Meiji Seika Kaisha Ltd. | Date: 2011-04-06

Disclosed is a process for producing 6-aryloxyquinoline derivatives useful as insecticides or fungicides for agricultural and horticultural use. The process comprises a cyclization reaction step of reacting an anthranilic acid derivative represented by general formula (1) with a kenone in the presence of an acid to obtain a quinolone derivative and a condensation reaction step of reacting the quinolone derivative with a halogen compound or an acid anhydride to obtain a quinoline derivative.

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