NIMTS General Hospital

Zografou, Greece

NIMTS General Hospital

Zografou, Greece
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Dalamaga M.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Karmaniolas K.,NIMTS General Hospital | Chamberland J.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Nikolaidou A.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | And 4 more authors.
Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental | Year: 2013

Objective Excess body weight has been implicated in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We thus explored the role of serum fetuin-A reflecting ectopic hepatic fat deposition when storage capacity of adipocytes has been exceeded, free leptin reflecting overall fat mass and adiponectin reflecting visceral fat mass, all potential mediators of the effects of obesity on insulin resistance and, consequently, to MDS risk. Materials & Methods In a hospital-based case-control study, we studied 101 cases with incident, histologically confirmed primary MDS and 101 controls matched on gender, age and date of diagnosis, between 2004 and 2007. Serum fetuin-A, adiponectin, leptin, leptin receptor, free leptin and insulin were determined. Results Higher serum fetuin-A, lower adiponectin and lower free leptin were all individually and independently associated with higher risk of MDS before and after controlling for matching and risk factors, such as age, gender, date of diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), family history of lymphohematopoietic cancer, smoking history and serum insulin. Interestingly, we have shown that these associations were prominent among overweight/obese individuals and persisted after controlling for BMI and serum insulin indicating that their effects are above and beyond insulinemia only. Conclusion Elevated serum fetuin-A but lower adiponectin and free leptin are associated with higher risk of MDS particularly among overweight/obese individuals. These findings suggest that the association between excessive weight gain and the risk of MDS could be mediated by fetuin-A, adiponectin and free leptin, which may have potential clinical and preventive implications. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Dalamaga M.,Rimini Street | Dalamaga M.,NIMTS Army Share Fund General Hospital | Sotiropoulos G.,Naval Hospital of Athens NNA | Karmaniolas K.,NIMTS General Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Biochemistry | Year: 2013

Objective: Previous few studies have shown that resistin is significantly elevated in breast cancer (BC) patients. Therefore, we investigated whether serum resistin could be used as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool for postmenopausal BC (PBC), taking into account clinicopathological features, serum tumor markers, anthropometric, metabolic, and, for the first time, inflammatory parameters. Methods: Serum resistin, tumor markers (CA 15-3 and CEA), metabolic, anthropometric and inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-6, hsCRP) were determined in 103 postmenopausal women with incident, pathologically confirmed, invasive BC, 103 controls matched on age and time of diagnosis, and 51 patients with benign breast lesions (BBL). Results: Mean serum resistin was significantly higher in cases than in controls and patients with BBL (p<. 0.001). In patients, resistin was significantly associated with tumor and inflammatory markers, cancer stage, tumor size, grade and lymph node invasion but not with anthropometric, metabolic parameters and hormone receptor status. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that serum IL-6 (p= 0.02) and cancer stage (p= 0.048) were the strongest determinants of serum resistin in cases adjusting for demographic, metabolic and clinicopathological features. Although resistin's diagnostic performance was low based on ROC curve analysis [0.72, 95% CI: 0.64-0.79], it could, however, represent a BC biomarker reflecting advanced disease stage and inflammatory state. Conclusion: Further prospective and longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether serum resistin could be used as a prognostic tool in BC monitoring and management. More research is essential to elucidate resistin's ontological role in the association between obesity, representing a chronic low-grade subclinical inflammation, and PBC. © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists.


Dalamaga M.,Rimini Street | Dalamaga M.,NIMTS Army Share Fund General Hospital | Archondakis S.,401 General Army Military Hospital | Sotiropoulos G.,Naval Hospital of Athens NNA | And 4 more authors.
Maturitas | Year: 2012

Objective: Previous studies have shown that visfatin is significantly elevated in patients with gastric carcinoma and postmenopausal breast cancer (PBC). We thus explored whether serum visfatin could be used as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool for PBC, taking into account clinicopathological features, serum tumor markers, anthropometric and metabolic parameters. Methods: Serum visfatin, tumor marker CA 15-3, carcinoembryonic antigen, metabolic and anthropometric parameters were determined in 103 postmenopausal women with pathologically confirmed, incident invasive breast cancer, 103 controls matched on age and time of diagnosis, and 51 patients with benign breast lesions (BBL). Results: Mean serum visfatin was significantly higher in cases than in controls and patients with BBL (p < 0.001). In cases, visfatin was significantly associated with CA 15-3 (p = 0.03), hormone-receptor status (p < 0.001), lymph node invasion (p = 0.06) but not with metabolic and anthropometric variables (p > 0.05). Multivariable regression analysis revealed that absence of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER-PR-) was the strongest significant determinant of serum visfatin (p < 0.001) in cases adjusting for demographic, metabolic and clinicopathological features. Based upon receiver operator characteristic analysis, serum visfatin outperformed CA 15-3 only in discriminating between PBC cases with early cancer stage than those with late stage, and in differentiating particularly patients with ER-PR- breast tumors. Conclusion: Further prospective and longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether serum visfatin could be used as a prognostic tool in the armamentarium of PBC monitoring and management in conjunction with other biomarkers. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Dalamaga M.,Rimini Street | Crotty B.H.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Fargnoli J.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Papadavid E.,Rimini Street | And 6 more authors.
Cancer Causes and Control | Year: 2010

Aim: Leptin and adiponectin are two well-studied adipokines in relation to malignancies. In this study, we examined the association between leptin/adiponectin and risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), as well as the relationships between adipokines and several established prognostic factors of B-CLL. Methods: Ninety-five patients with incident B-CLL and 95 hospital controls matched on age and gender were studied between 2001 and 2007, and blood samples were collected. Leptin, total and high molecular weight adiponectin, and prognostic markers of B-CLL were determined. Results: Cases had a higher body mass index (BMI) than controls (p = 0.01) and lower levels of leptin (p < 0.01). Significantly more cases than controls presented a family history of lymphohematopoietic cancer (LHC) (p = 0.01). Higher serum leptin levels were associated with lower risk of B-CLL adjusting for age, gender, family history of LHC, BMI and serum adiponectin; the multivariate odds ratio comparing highest to lowest tertile was 0.05 (95% CI 0.01-0.29, p trend < 0.001); Adiponectin was not significantly different between cases and controls. Conclusion: Leptin was found to be inversely associated with risk of CLL but in contrast to prior studies of CLL and hematologic malignancies, this study found no significant association between CLL and adiponectin. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Tsibouris P.,NIMTS General Hospital | Kalantzis C.,NIMTS General Hospital | Apostolopoulos P.,NIMTS General Hospital | Alexandrakis G.,NIMTS General Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Digestive Endoscopy | Year: 2012

Background: Overt and occult bleeding are the main indications for a wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) study of the small bowel. Most published studies omit patients aged over 80. Aim: To determine whether WCE is feasible in patients with overt or occult bleeding over age 80 and to define the spectrum of small bowel pathologies in this age group. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective non-randomized tertiary care study, 60 patients at least 80 years or older (aged group) and 120 matched patients aged <80 years (younger group) with overt or occult bleeding (including iron deficiency anaemia) and no significant gastroscopic or colonoscopic findings underwent WCE. Results: Of the 180 patients, 46 (77%) patients in the aged group and 97 (81%) in the younger group successfully completed small bowel study (P = 0.51). There was no difference in gastric transit time and small bowel passing time between the two groups. More patients in the aged group (48 cases, 80%) than the younger group (56 cases, 47%) presented with small bowel angiodysplasias (P < 0.0001). Nevertheless, there was no difference between the two groups concerning ulcerative and neoplastic lesions. No patient presented with capsule impaction, but more patients in the aged group (35 cases, 58%) than in the younger group (10 cases, 8%) found the study difficult and tiresome (P < 0.001). Preparation validation was poor in 34% of small bowel lumen in the aged group and 19% in the younger group (P = 0.03). Conclusion: WCE is feasible, although rather tiresome, in patients over the age of 80. Though the vast majority of patients older than 80 presented with angiodysplasias, there were no differences between the aged and younger groups in the presence of ulcerative lesions and polyps or tumors. © 2011 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.


Tsibouris P.,NIMTS General Hospital | Tsibouris P.,Blackpool Victoria Hospital | Hendrickse M.T.,Blackpool Victoria Hospital | Kalantzis C.,NIMTS General Hospital | Isaacs P.E.T.,Blackpool Victoria Hospital
Hepato-Gastroenterology | Year: 2012

Background/Aims: Duodenogastric reflux is a possible risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (CA) development. Gastric surgery that destroys or distorts the pylorus is a good model to study the effects of duodenogastric reflux. To define the consequences of gastrectomy in patients with Barrett esophagus (BE). Methodology: Records of all BE/CA patients examined in Blackpool-Wyre-Fylde area were reviewed. All surviving patients completed validated questionnaires. Results: Gastrectomy was more prevalent in CA patients (14 (3.6%) BE vs. 15 (13.3%) CA, p=0.0002). Partial gastrectomy was more prevalent in CA patients, (7 (1.8%) BE vs. 10 (8.8%) CA, p=0.0004), while there was no difference in total gastrectomy between the two groups. Persistence of H. pylori infection after gastrectomy and smoking were more frequent among CA patients with gastrectomy. Mean follow-up time in patients with prior gastrectomy was 78 (SD=76.4) months for BE patients and 119.3 (SD=72.9) months for CA patients (p=0.07). In logistic regression analysis gastrectomy, in addition to old age, long-term reflux, absence of hiatal hernia and H. pylori infection were risk factors for CA. Conclusions: Gastrectomy and especially partial gastrectomy was more prevalent in CA patients. © H.G.E. Update Medical Publishing S.A.


Tsibouris P.,NIMTS General Hospital | Periklis A.,NIMTS General Hospital | Chrissostomos K.,NIMTS General Hospital | Antonios Z.,NIMTS General Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology | Year: 2013

Background and Aims: Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is used in Crohn's disease (CD) to define disease extent. We aimed to define WCE detection rate of small bowel ulcerative lesions and completion rate in CD patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 102 consecutive CD patients, who successfully passed patency capsule, were matched to 102 controls. WCE was performed in both patients (in acute phase and CD clinical remission) and controls. Results: Eighty-six (84%) controls versus 62 (61%) patients in the acute phase ( P = 0.003) and 96 (94%) in remission ( P = 0.02) completed WCE study. Gastric passing time was 48 ± 66 min in controls, 66 ± 82 min in CD acute phase ( P = 0.03) and 30 ± 21 min in remission ( P = 0.07). Small bowel passing time was 276 ± 78 min in controls, 299 ± 78 min in the acute phase of CD ( P = 0.04) and 248 ± 89 min in remission ( P = 0.01). Mean capsule endoscopy Crohn's disease activity index (CECDAI) score was 14 ± 6 in acute small bowel CD, 12 ± 7 in acute small-large bowel CD ( P = 0.08) and 2 ± 2 in both CD types while in remission ( P = 1.00). Small bowel ulcerative lesions in the acute phase were more frequently in distal small bowel. Aphthous ulcers were frequent a month after entering clinical remission and tend to disappear gradually later on. No ulcerative lesions were present in deep remission. Patency capsule is rather safe to exclude small bowel obstruction. Conclusions: (1) A high percentage of patients with active CD do not complete small bowel study with WCE. (2) Small bowel ulcerative lesions in clinical remission were less severe, although at least 6 months are needed in order for them to disappear.


PubMed | NIMTS General Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: World journal of gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics | Year: 2014

To define the significance of ischemic heart disease (IHD) (stable angina to infarction) co-existance in Barrett esophagus (BE) patients and patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (AdE).All BE/AdE patients in Blackpool-Wyre-Fylde area and Trikala prefecture identified from medical records. Patient clinical details were obtained from hospital and General Practitioner records. Additional information was gathered from validated questionnaire.Forty (33%) AdE and 83 (19%) BE patients had IHD (P = 0.002). Eighteen (15%) AdE and 34 (8%) BE patients had suffered a myocardial infarction (P = 0.03). Three (3%) AdE and 7 (2%) BE patients had severe heart failure (P = 0.82). Thirty-nine (47%) BE with IHD and 8 (20%) AdE patients with IHD consumed aspirin daily (P = 0.004). Seventh-seven (93%) BE patients with IHD and 36 (90%) AdE patients with IHD were on statins (P = 0.86). Logistic regression analysis: AdE was more frequent in the elderly, with long term reflux, long BE and concurrent IHD (odds ratio: 2.086, P = 0.001) not consuming statins. Eighteen (22%) BE patients with IHD [16 (84%) with myocardial infarction] vs 33 (10%) without IHD died from non-neoplastic causes within 24 mo from BE diagnosis (P = 0.005).IHD is more prevalent in AdE than BE patients. Increased prevalence of AdE is related with the presence of myocardial infarction but not severe heart failure, possibly because patients with BE and severe IHD have low life expectancy.


PubMed | NIMTS General Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Digestive endoscopy : official journal of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society | Year: 2012

Overt and occult bleeding are the main indications for a wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) study of the small bowel. Most published studies omit patients aged over 80. To determine whether WCE is feasible in patients with overt or occult bleeding over age 80 and to define the spectrum of small bowel pathologies in this age group. In a retrospective non-randomized tertiary care study, 60 patients at least 80 years or older (aged group) and 120 matched patients aged <80years (younger group) with overt or occult bleeding (including iron deficiency anaemia) and no significant gastroscopic or colonoscopic findings underwent WCE. Of the 180 patients, 46 (77%) patients in the aged group and 97 (81%) in the younger group successfully completed small bowel study (P=0.51). There was no difference in gastric transit time and small bowel passing time between the two groups. More patients in the aged group (48 cases, 80%) than the younger group (56 cases, 47%) presented with small bowel angiodysplasias (P<0.0001). Nevertheless, there was no difference between the two groups concerning ulcerative and neoplastic lesions. No patient presented with capsule impaction, but more patients in the aged group (35 cases, 58%) than in the younger group (10 cases, 8%) found the study difficult and tiresome (P<0.001). Preparation validation was poor in 34% of small bowel lumen in the aged group and 19% in the younger group (P=0.03). WCE is feasible, although rather tiresome, in patients over the age of 80. Though the vast majority of patients older than 80 presented with angiodysplasias, there were no differences between the aged and younger groups in the presence of ulcerative lesions and polyps or tumors.


PubMed | NIMTS General Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Hepato-gastroenterology | Year: 2012

Duodenogastric reflux is a possible risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (CA) development. Gastric surgery that destroys or distorts the pylorus is a good model to study the effects of duodenogastric reflux. To define the consequences of gastrectomy in patients with Barrett esophagus (BE).Records of all BE/CA patients examined in Blackpool-Wyre-Fylde area were reviewed. All surviving patients completed validated questionnaires.Gastrectomy was more prevalent in CA patients (14 (3.6%) BE vs. 15 (13.3%) CA, p=0.0002). Partial gastrectomy was more prevalent in CA patients, (7 (1.8%) BE vs. 10 (8.8%) CA, p=0.0004), while there was no difference in total gastrectomy between the two groups. Persistence of H. pylori infection after gastrectomy and smoking were more frequent among CA patients with gastrectomy. Mean follow-up time in patients with prior gastrectomy was 78 (SD=76.4) months for BE patients and 119.3 (SD=72.9) months for CA patients (p=0.07). In logistic regression analysis gastrectomy, in addition to old age, long-term reflux, absence of hiatal hernia and H. pylori infection were risk factors for CA.Gastrectomy and especially partial gastrectomy was more prevalent in CA patients.

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