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Khanna R.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Khanna R.,Swasthya Kalyan Homeopathy Medical College and Research Center | Pardhe N.D.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Srivastava N.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Bajpai M.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2016

Introduction: Although many different types of Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) membranes (resorbable/non-resorbable, including titanium mesh) have been used in the field of Periodontics till now, but this is the first and only clinical study testing the effectiveness of an ultra thin pure Titanium Membrane (Ultra Ti) as a GTR membrane in infra-bony periodontal defects. Aim: To compare the efficacy of GTR in intra-bony defects with newly introduced non-resorbable barrier membrane, made of titanium called “Ultra-Ti ® GTR Membrane” versus open flap debridement. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical split mouth study was designed wherein each patient received both the control and test treatment. Two similar defects were selected in each of the 12 patients and were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments. Both the surgeries consisted of identical procedures except for the omission of the barrier membrane in the control sites. Full mouth Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Pocket Probing Depth (PPD) and Relative Attachment Level (RAL) were recorded before surgery and after 6 months and 9 months along with hard tissue measurements at the time of surgery and then at re-entry after 9 months. Radiographs were also taken before surgery and 9 months post operatively. Student's paired t-test and unpaired t-test (SPSS software version 9) were used to analyze the results. Results: Nine months after treatment, the test defects gained 4.375 ± 1.189mm of RAL, while the control defects yielded a significantly lower RAL gain of 3.417 ± 0.996mm. Pocket reduction was also significantly higher in the test group (4.917 ± 0.996mm) when compared with the controls (3.83 ± 0.718mm). There was a significant bone fill (54.69% of defect fill) obtained in the test site, unlike the control site (8.91%). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that GTR with “Ultra-Ti® GTR Membrane” resulted in a significant added benefit in comparison with open flap debridement. © 2016, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.


Agarwal V.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Gupta M.,Government Dental College and Hospital | Gupta A.,Government of Rajasthan
Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development | Year: 2014

There has been a tremendous development in the field of tissue engineering in past two decades that can be applied in the dentistry. With the more recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular basis controlling the development and regeneration of tooth structures, great changes are expected in conventional dental therapies. These biologically based procedures can result in continued root development, increase in dentinal wall thickness and induction of apical closure even in the case of necrotic immature permanent teeth. In this review role of stem cells in bio- root engineering will be discussed.


PubMed | NIMS Dental College and Hospital and Swasthya Kalyan Homeopathy Medical College and Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR | Year: 2016

Although many different types of Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) membranes (resorbable/non-resorbable, including titanium mesh) have been used in the field of Periodontics till now, but this is the first and only clinical study testing the effectiveness of an ultra thin pure Titanium Membrane (Ultra Ti) as a GTR membrane in infra-bony periodontal defects.To compare the efficacy of GTR in intra-bony defects with newly introduced non-resorbable barrier membrane, made of titanium called Ultra-Ti A prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical split mouth study was designed wherein each patient received both the control and test treatment. Two similar defects were selected in each of the 12 patients and were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments. Both the surgeries consisted of identical procedures except for the omission of the barrier membrane in the control sites. Full mouth Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Pocket Probing Depth (PPD) and Relative Attachment Level (RAL) were recorded before surgery and after 6 months and 9 months along with hard tissue measurements at the time of surgery and then at re-entry after 9 months. Radiographs were also taken before surgery and 9 months post operatively. Students paired t-test and unpaired t-test (SPSS software version 9) were used to analyze the results.Nine months after treatment, the test defects gained 4.375 1.189mm of RAL, while the control defects yielded a significantly lower RAL gain of 3.417 0.996mm. Pocket reduction was also significantly higher in the test group (4.917 0.996mm) when compared with the controls (3.83 0.718mm). There was a significant bone fill (54.69% of defect fill) obtained in the test site, unlike the control site (8.91%).The present study demonstrated that GTR with Ultra-Ti


PubMed | NIMS Dental College & Hospital and NIMS Dental College and Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR | Year: 2015

Condylar aplasia which means failure of development is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported.


PubMed | NIMS Dental College & Hospital and NIMS Dental College and Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR | Year: 2015

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare vascular tumour which is benign but locally aggressive and occurs invariably in young and adolescent males. It seldom involves the oral cavity but has the tendency to invade the adjacent structures. Its characteristic features include slow progression, aggressive growth & an increased rate of persistence and recurrence due to its location in inaccessible areas. In literature, very few cases of JNA have been reported with extension into the oral cavity. Here, a case of JNA with extension into the oral cavity has been discussed who reported to our institute.


Gupta R.,Nair Hospital and Dental College | Debnath N.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital | Nayak P.A.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Khandelwal V.,Index Institute of Dental Science
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2014

Gingival squamous cell carcinoma (GSCC) is a relatively rare malignant neoplasm of the oral cavity. It represents less than 10% of diagnosed intraoral carcinoma. Because of its close proximity to the teeth and periodontium, the tumour can mimic tooth-related benign infl ammatory conditions. This case report describes a patient diagnosed with GSCC presenting as localised periodontitis. Copyright 2014 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


Pardhe N.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Chhibber N.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Agarwal D.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Jain M.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Vijay P.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2015

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare vascular tumour which is benign but locally aggressive and occurs invariably in young and adolescent males. It seldom involves the oral cavity but has the tendency to invade the adjacent structures. Its characteristic features include slow progression, aggressive growth & an increased rate of persistence and recurrence due to its location in inaccessible areas. In literature, very few cases of JNA have been reported with extension into the oral cavity. Here, a case of JNA with extension into the oral cavity has been discussed who reported to our institute. © 2015, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.


Vijay P.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Pardhe N.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Sunil V.S.B.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Bajpai M.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Chhibber N.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2015

Condylar aplasia which means “failure of development” is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported. © 2015, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All right reserved.


Reddy Y.G.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Sharma R.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Singh A.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Agarwal V.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital | Agrawal V.,NIMS Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2013

Aim: This study has compared the Shear Bond Strengths (SBSs) of ceramic brackets and metal brackets. Materials and Method: Forty freshly extracted, human maxillary first premolars were selected for bonding. They were equally bonded with ceramic brackets (Transcend series 6000) and metal brackets (Mini Dynalock Straight wire brackets). A no - mix orthodontic adhesive system was used. Their shear bond strengths were measured by using the Instron universal machine. Results: The mean bond strength of the ceramic brackets was 20.68 ± 3.89 Mpa and that of the metal brackets was 12.15 ± 1.32 MPa. Conclusion: The shear bond strength of the ceramic brackets was found to be superior than that of the metal brackets.


PubMed | NIMS Dental College and Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR | Year: 2016

Chewing Side Preference (CSP) is said to occur when mastication is recognized exclusively/consistently or predominantly on the same side of the jaw. It can be assessed by using the direct method - visual observation and indirect methods by electric programs, such as cinematography, kinetography and computerized electromyography.The present study was aimed at evaluating the prevalence of CSP in deciduous, mixed and permanent dentitions and relating its association with dental caries.In a cross-sectional observational study, 240 school going children aged 3 to 18years were randomly allocated to three experimental groups according to the deciduous dentition, mixed dentition and permanent dentition period. The existence of a CSP was determined using a direct method by asking the children to chew on a piece of gum (trident sugarless). The Mann Whitney U-test was used to compare the CSP and also among the boys and girls. The Spearmans Correlation Coefficient was used to correlate CSP and dental caries among the three study groups and also among the groups.CSP was observed in 69%, 83% and 76% of children with primary, mixed and permanent dentition respectively (p>0.05). There was no statistically significant association between the presence of CSP and dental caries among the three study groups.There was a weak or no correlation between gender and distribution of CSP and between presence of CSP and dental caries.

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