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MELVILLE, N.Y., Dec. 14, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Nikon Instruments Inc. today unveiled the winners of the sixth annual Nikon Small World in Motion Photomicrography Competition, awarding First Place to William Gilpin of Stanford University for his video depicting an eight-week-old starfish larva churning the water around its body as it searches for food. Gilpin and his colleagues studied the starfish larva as a model system for how physics shapes evolution, and were surprised and intrigued that a common organism like a starfish could create such an intricate and unexpected pattern in the water. A video accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/58b5be6b-4acd-414b-b6f0-ab24830f2630 These complex currents are not only aesthetically pleasing – they depict a phenomenon that was previously unknown, and illustrate how starfish larvae have evolved intricate appendages to create these beautiful and physically taxing flow patterns. The elegant vortices of water efficiently pull particles towards the animal's body, but it comes at a price: reducing the larva's ability to swim to escape predators while also broadcasting its current location. This microscopic larva, although only less than a millimeter in length, could have big implications. The cilia in the starfish larva that make these vortices possible are universal and present in most other organisms, including humans. “While starfish are the among the first animals that have evolved to control the environment around them in this manner, science proves that adaptations are likely mimicked by other more-complex animals later,” said Gilpin. “Biology aside, this process can also be the foundation for industrial purposes for something like advancements in water filters for precise manipulation of water.” To create the video, Gilpin and his team used dark field microscopy to film the paths of small plastic beads that were directed by the flow currents around the starfish, similar to how photographers capture time-lapse videos of star trails in the night sky. They then stacked images in contiguous groups to make a time-resolved long-exposure video to showcase the movement. To capture and share movement – and life - seen under the microscope is a relatively new phenomenon, powered by advances in video capabilities in recent years. This is only the sixth year of the “In Motion” category, led by scientists and artists like Gilpin pulling back the curtain on a dimension of life previously unseen to all but a select few. “The beauty of this time-lapse video and the science behind it epitomizes how video is not only essential to scientific researchers, but to inspire future scientists to explore life around them,” said Eric Flem, Communications Manager, Nikon Instruments. “It is one thing to see a still image captured under the microscope, but to see this life in motion truly puts the intricacy and beauty of the world into perspective.” Another feeding frenzy took second place in the 2016 Nikon Small World in Motion competition. The video by Small World veteran Charles Krebs of Issaquah, Washington, depicts the hunting technique of the predatory ciliate, Lacrymaria olor. The organism rapidly extends its neck, which can stretch more than seven times its body length in any direction, to capture its microscopic prey. This year’s third place video, by Wim van Egmond of Berkel en Rodenrijs, Netherlands, reveals the unexpected beauty of the fungus Aspergillus niger, a common food contaminant, through a time-lapse of its flowering bodies. Each frame is a combination of about 100 images. This particular strain is a mutation that results in sporangia of different colors. Even the individual spores are clear in this highly-detailed video. In addition to First, Second and Third prize winners, Nikon Small World in Motion recognized an additional 17 entries as Honorable Mentions. Gilpin and his team hope their video will inspire others to explore and discover the hidden world. “It gives us a chance to share and explain scientific discoveries that we hope will appeal to many other scientists, as well as the public at large,” said Gilpin. “For us, it's incredible and exciting that something as widely-known as a starfish can exhibit an unexpected and beautiful behavior, and we hope to share our excitement with others.” For additional information, please visit www.nikonsmallworld.com, or follow the conversation on Facebook, Twitter @NikonSmallWorld and Instagram @NikonInstruments. First Place William Gilpin, Vivek N. Prakash, and Manu Prakash Stanford University Stanford, California, USA An eight-week-old starfish larva creates vortices in order to capture its main food source, swimming algae Dark Field 4x Honorable Mention Dr. Scott Chimileski Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts, USA Hundreds of harmless cheese mites (Tyrophagus casei) bustle across a rind of cheddar cheese Stereomicroscopy        5x Honorable Mention Dr. Liang Gao Stony Brook University, Department of Chemistry Stony Brook, New York, USA The developmental process of an early stage C. elegans embryo with individual cells rendered in different colors Tiling Light Sheet Selective Plane Illumination 45x Honorable Mention Ralph Grimm Queensland, Australia Blood circulation in the tail of a cane toad tadpole (Bufo Marinus) Differential Interference Contrast      100x/200x Honorable Mention Dr. Elliott Hagedorn and Brian Li Boston Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts, USA A fluorescent dextran dye is injected into circulation, which subsequently illuminates the common blood flow between the parabiotic zebrafish embryos.     Stereoscope, Epifluorescence Honorable Mention Dr. Philipp Keller and Raghav K. Chhetri      Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute           Ashburn, Virginia, USA Spatially isotropic whole-animal functional imaging of a behaving Drosophila larva labeled with a calcium indicator Custom-built IsoView light-sheet microscope 16x Honorable Mention Dr. Philipp Keller, Kristin Branson, and Fernando Amat Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute           Ashburn, Virginia, USA Automated cell tracking in an entire developing zebrafish embryo Custom-built IsoView light-sheet microscope 16x Honorable Mention Dr. Robert Markus University of Nottingham Beeston, United Kingdom Birth and first steps of a faucet snail Polarization/Color Dark Field 50x Honorable Mention Dr. Renaud Renault    Institut Curie, Weizmann Institute Paris, France    Neurons seeded in two different micro-compartments extend their neurites through micro-tunnels to establish connections with each other   Epi fluorescence/Time-lapse (30 hours each shot)      20x Honorable Mention Dr. Anthony Vecchiarelli & Dr. Kiyoshi Mizuuchi National Institutes of Health North Potomac, Maryland, USA Self-organization of purified proteins important in bacterial cell division Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence           10x/40x ABOUT THE NIKON SMALL WORLD PHOTOMICROGRAPHY COMPETITION The Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition is open to anyone with an interest in photography. Participants may submit their images in traditional 35mm format, or upload digital images or videos directly at www.nikonsmallworld.com. For additional information, contact Nikon Small World, Nikon Instruments Inc., 1300 Walt Whitman Road, Melville, NY 11747, USA or phone (631) 547-4200. ABOUT NIKON INSTRUMENTS INC. Nikon Instruments Inc. is a world leader in the development and manufacture of optical and digital imaging technology for biomedical applications. Now in its 99th year, Nikon provides complete optical systems that offer optimal versatility, performance and productivity. Cutting-edge instruments include microscopes, digital imaging products and software. Nikon Instruments is one of the microscopy and digital imaging arms of Nikon Inc., the world leader in digital imaging, precision optics and photo imaging technology. For more information, visit www.nikoninstruments.com. Product-related inquiries may be directed to Nikon Instruments at 800-52-NIKON.


MELVILLE, N.Y., Dec. 05, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Nikon Instruments Inc., innovator of advanced optical instruments, is showcasing three models of the all-new ECLIPSE Ti2 Inverted Research Microscope at the American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting 2016 in San Francisco this week. Equipped with an unpreceded 25mm field of view, improved stability, speed and usability powered by an intelligent microscope operation guide, this groundbreaking microscope allows users to conduct research more quickly and efficiently than before. The ECLIPSE Ti2 will be featured as the core imaging platform for a variety of imaging applications including multi-angle TIRF, photostimulation, confocal, multiphoton and super-resolution. Conference attendees will be able to explore the benefits of the new Ti2 microscope as well as the latest enhancements in each of the imaging applications at Booth #623. “At Nikon, our goal is to continually challenge the boundaries of imaging capabilities to support scientists in their research efforts,” said Steve Ross, Ph.D., General Manager, Products and Marketing, Nikon Instruments Inc. “With a field of view nearly twice as large as traditional systems, the ECLIPSE Ti2 not only meets but exceeds current demands for larger FOV and data throughput, providing a core imaging platform that is future-proof.” The ECLIPSE Ti2 succeeds the ECLIPSE Ti Inverted Research Microscope, which has become a standard in many laboratories for live-cell imaging. The groundbreaking 25mm FOV was enabled by enlarging various optical components including the tube lens and fluorescence filter cubes and utilizing fly-eye lens technology to ensure uniform edge-to-edge illumination and flat field imaging of the enhanced FOV. Furthermore, the Ti2 incorporates a fourth-generation Perfect Focus System (PFS4) which improves upon the industry leading auto-focusing mechanism and provides an ultra-stable imaging platform. Combined with a newly redesigned Z-drive for high-speed precision stacking, the Ti2 provides a fast, ultra-stable imaging experience that will enhance both super-resolution and diffraction-limited imaging applications. The microscope also offers intelligent functions to guide users through imaging workflows by gathering data from internal sensors – eliminating the possibility of user errors. The large FOV imaging capability of the Ti2, the intelligent Assist Guide, as well as new Ti2 accessories such as the auto correction collar (ACC) will be on display. Even more from Nikon Instruments ASCB 2016 attendees are invited to experience all of the above systems and products at Nikon’s Booth #623. ABOUT NIKON INSTRUMENTS INC. Nikon Instruments Inc. is a world leader in the development and manufacture of optical and digital imaging technology for biomedical applications. Now in its 99th year, Nikon provides complete optical systems that offer optimal versatility, performance and productivity. Cutting-edge instruments include microscopes, digital imaging products and software. Nikon Instruments is one of the microscopy and digital imaging arms of Nikon Inc., the world leader in digital imaging, precision optics and photo imaging technology. For more information, visit www.nikoninstruments.com. Product-related inquiries may be directed to Nikon Instruments at 800-52-NIKON.


MELVILLE, N.Y., Nov. 09, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Nikon Instruments Inc. today raises the bar for core imaging capability with the release of the new ECLIPSE Ti2 Inverted Research Microscope. The ECLIPSE Ti2 revolutionizes how researchers capture data with a microscope, delivering an unprecedented 25mm field of view—up to twice as wide as competitive systems—as well as improved stability and usability powered by an intelligent microscope operation guide. Nikon Instruments will introduce the new ECLIPSE Ti2, the successor to the popular ECLIPSE Ti inverted research microscope, at Neuroscience 2016, on November 12-16 in San Diego, California. “Nikon’s inverted research microscopes have become a keystone platform for many live-cell imaging systems in laboratories around the world,” said Stephen Ross, Ph.D., General Manager, Products and Marketing, Nikon Instruments Inc. “Dynamic live-cell imaging and throughput are even more critical in research today, and the new ECLIPSE Ti2 will enable scientists to address questions with limitless flexibility and throughput never seen before. In combination with Nikon’s powerful acquisition and analysis software, NIS-Elements, the Ti2 is a total innovation in imaging.” With this incredible FOV, the ECLIPSE Ti2 maximizes the sensor area of large-format CMOS cameras and significantly improves data throughput. The Ti2’s exceptionally stable, drift-free platform is designed to meet the demands of super-resolution imaging, while its unique hardware-triggering capabilities enhance even the most challenging, high-speed imaging applications. The Ti2 also offers intelligent functions to guide users through imaging workflows by gathering data from internal sensors – eliminating the possibility of user errors. The status of each sensor is automatically recorded during acquisition, providing quality control for imaging experiments and enhancing data reproducibility. 1 Includes eyepiece tube base with built-in camera 2 As of October 2016, for conventional research inverted microscopes (based on Nikon’s survey) ECLIPSE Ti2 will be available in January 2017. Visit www.nikoninstruments.com for more information. ABOUT NIKON INSTRUMENTS INC. Nikon Instruments Inc. is a world leader in the development and manufacture of optical and digital imaging technology for biomedical applications. Now in its 99th year, Nikon provides complete optical systems that offer optimal versatility, performance and productivity. Cutting-edge instruments include microscopes, digital imaging products and software. Nikon Instruments is one of the microscopy and digital imaging arms of Nikon Inc., the world leader in digital imaging, precision optics and photo imaging technology. For more information, visit www.nikoninstruments.com. Product-related inquiries may be directed to Nikon Instruments at 800-52-NIKON.


New ECLIPSE Ti2 Inverted Research Microscope doubles field of view, revolutionizes how researchers capture data with microscope MELVILLE, N.Y., Nov. 14, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) --  Nikon Instruments Inc., innovator of advanced optical instruments, is debuting the all-new ECLIPSE Ti2 Inverted Research Microscope at the Society for Neuroscience’s annual Neuroscience 2016 meeting in San Diego this week. This microscope revolutionizes how researchers capture data, delivering an unprecedented 25mm field of view that allows for accelerated research, as well as improved stability and usability powered by an intelligent microscope operation guide. Nikon will also showcase several other state-of-the art multiphoton, confocal, super-resolution and optogenetics systems configured for neurobiology applications at Booth #2513. “Nikon is constantly pushing the boundaries to expand imaging capabilities for scientists to address critical research questions, and every year we look forward to sharing our latest innovations with our SFN community,” said Steve Ross, Ph.D., General Manager, Products and Marketing, Nikon Instruments Inc. “This is a truly exciting year, starting with the ECLIPSE Ti2 inverted research microscope series which offers a groundbreaking large field of view to revolutionize and accelerate research and the collection of state-of-the art systems for neurobiology we’re unveiling in San Diego.” The new ECLIPSE Ti2 is the successor to the iconic ECLIPSE Ti Inverted Research Microscope, and, along with the unprecedented FOV, features integrated fly-eye lens technology to provide uniform edge-to-edge illumination of the large FOV while redesigned large fluorescence filter cubes further ensure flat field imaging. Furthermore, the Ti2 incorporates a fourth generation Perfect Focus System (PFS) which once again improves upon the industry leading auto-focusing mechanism and combined with a newly redesigned z-drive, provide an ultra-stable imaging experience. The microscope also offers intelligent functions to guide users through imaging workflows by gathering data from internal sensors – eliminating the possibility of user errors. Large FOV imaging capability of the Ti2 as well as new accessories such as the auto correction collar (ACC) will be on display. In addition to the new inverted research microscope, Nikon will also be displaying a collection other state-of-the art super-resolution, multiphoton, and confocal systems. Even more from Nikon Instruments Neuroscience 2016 attendees are invited to experience all of the above systems and products at Nikon’s booth #2513. ABOUT NIKON INSTRUMENTS INC. Nikon Instruments Inc. is a world leader in the development and manufacture of optical and digital imaging technology for biomedical applications. Now in its 99th year, Nikon provides complete optical systems that offer optimal versatility, performance and productivity. Cutting-edge instruments include microscopes, digital imaging products and software. Nikon Instruments is one of the microscopy and digital imaging arms of Nikon Inc., the world leader in digital imaging, precision optics and photo imaging technology. For more information, visit www.nikoninstruments.com. Product-related inquiries may be directed to Nikon Instruments at 800-52-NIKON.


LoBiondo J.,Nikon Instruments | Abramowitz M.,Olympus America Inc. | Friedman M.M.,AccuMed International
Current Protocols in Cytometry | Year: 2011

The objective is the most crucial image-forming component of a microscope. A knowledge of the many types of objectives available and their characteristics is critical to the selection of appropriate objectives for image cytometry. This unit discusses aberrations in image formation and their correction, construction, and types of objectives, and objectives for other microscopy applications, explaining the advantages and limitations of each one. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


PubMed | Nikon Instruments, LCG Group, University College London and Katherine Dormandy Haemophilia Center and Thrombosis Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH | Year: 2016

Many platelet functions are dependent on bioactive molecules released from their granules. Deficiencies of these granules in number, shape or content are associated with bleeding. The small size of these granules is such that imaging them for diagnosis has traditionally required electron microscopy. However, recently developed super-resolution microscopes provide sufficient spatial resolution to effectively image platelet granules. When combined with automated image analysis, these methods provide a quantitative, unbiased, rapidly acquired dataset that can readily and reliably reveal differences in platelet granules between individuals.To demonstrate the ability of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to efficiently differentiate between healthy volunteers and three patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.Blood samples were taken from three patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and seven controls. Patients 1-3 have gene defects in HPS1, HPS6 and HPS5, respectively; all controls were healthy volunteers. Platelet-rich plasma was isolated from blood and the platelets fixed, stained for CD63 and processed for analysis by immunofluorescence microscopy, using a custom-built SIM microscope.SIM can successfully resolve CD63-positive structures in fixed platelets. A determination of the number of CD63-positive structures per platelet allowed us to conclude that each patient was significantly different from all of the controls with 99% confidence.A super-resolution imaging approach is effective and rapid in objectively differentiating between patients with a platelet bleeding disorder and healthy volunteers. CD63 is a useful marker for predicting Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and could be used in the diagnosis of patients suspected of other platelet granule disorders.


Davis M.A.,Nikon Instruments | Prazsky O.,Laboratory Imaging | Sysko L.R.,Nikon Instruments
Current Protocols in Cytometry | Year: 2015

Time-lapse imaging is a rich data source offering potential kinetic information of cellular activity and behavior. Tracking and extracting measurements of objects from time-lapse datasets are challenges that result from the complexity and dynamics of each object's motion and intensity or the appearance of new objects in the field of view. A wide range of strategies for proper data sampling, object detection, image analysis, and post-analysis interpretation are available. Theory and methods for single-particle tracking, spot detection, and object linking are discussed in this unit, as well as examples with step-by-step procedures for utilizing semi-automated software and visualization tools for achieving tracking results and interpreting this output. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


Laevsky G.S.,Nikon Instruments | O'Connell C.B.,Nikon Instruments
Current Protocols in Cytometry | Year: 2013

Super-resolution microscopy overcomes diffraction to generate images with superior resolution compared to conventional light microscopy. Localization-based super-resolution methods result in up to ten-fold improvement in resolution by determining the positions of fluorescent molecules with sub-pixel accuracy. This process critically depends on controlled emission at the level of individual fluorophores so that fluorescence is nonoverlapping, allowing for accurate centroid determination of diffraction-limited spots by Gaussian fitting of the pixel intensities. The intrinsic photoswitching behavior of many fluorophores provides a convenient way to achieve emitter isolation. Here, we describe methods for label preparation and staining of cellular structures to obtain high-quality images using localization super resolution. We also compare labeling strategies and dye characteristics relevant to all localization-based techniques, such as STORM and PALM. © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


Drent P.,Nikon Instruments
Biochemist | Year: 2010

Optical light microscopy is set to enter a new era of super-resolution with the development of technologies that overcome the resolution limit of traditional light microscopes. Ideal for a variety of disciplines within the biological sciences, these new technologies enable the study of cell structure at the nanoscale, revealing cellular features previously impossible to see. Whereas nanoscale imaging has been possible for many years using electron microscopy methods, the new super-resolution optical technologies enable two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging of fixed and/or living specimens. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the development of super-resolution microscopy and Nikon's offering for super-resolution fluorescence imaging, N-SIM, with lateral resolution twice that of conventional light microscopes and suitable for fixed and live cell imaging, and N-STORM, which achieves a remarkable lateral resolution of approximately 20 nm and axial resolution of approximately 50 nm in fixed specimens. © 2010 The Biochemical Society.


LoBiondo J.,Nikon Instruments
Current protocols in cytometry / editorial board, J. Paul Robinson, managing editor ... [et al.] | Year: 2011

The objective is the most crucial image-forming component of a microscope. A knowledge of the many types of objectives available and their characteristics is critical to the selection of appropriate objectives for image cytometry. This unit discusses aberrations in image formation and their correction, construction, and types of objectives, and objectives for other microscopy applications, explaining the advantages and limitations of each one.

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